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600 Watt bulb with 1000 watt ballast


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43 replies to this topic

#1 Suzie

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 02:28 AM

Hi,
I am wondering whether it's possible to run safely a 600 watt bulb hooked up to a 1000 watt ballast. I know it's possible to run various wattages in an incandescent fixture, and each one draws only as much power as it needs.
I want to switch from 1000 watts to 600 watts in my veg room for the summer, and it would be great not to have to buy another ballast.


#2 Guest__*

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 04:01 AM

Quote:

I am wondering whether it's possible to run safely a 600 watt bulb hooked up to a 1000 watt ballast.




Not in my opinion. Toooooooo much at risk to tempt fate.


#3 Fing_57

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 06:17 AM

yes you can and its safe
1000w ballast can use 1000w bulb and down


#4 Guest__*

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 11:48 PM

Quote:

and each one draws only as much power as it needs




That's the operative concept right there. Running a lower wattage bulb in a higher wattage ballast will only result in more ballast 'headroom', which means it will last longer.


#5 Wodan

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 12:51 AM

Quote:

Quote:

and each one draws only as much power as it needs




That's the operative concept right there. Running a lower wattage bulb in a higher wattage ballast will only result in more ballast 'headroom', which means it will last longer.




Really? I did not know that.
This could be a major decision for someone just starting out.
The notion that you could just buy the ballast for a 1000 watt bulb and use smaller bulbs till you need the extra light and all.

Is this true of both HPS and MH?

Leaching The 'chicken soup' of Cannabis growing.

#6 AussieJoe

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 03:39 AM

1000 watt ballast starts up with a different amperege as the 600 does,maybe the components are different inside.I wouldnt like a 600 bulb shatter next to me when switching it on.I will look into it,but my gut feeling tells me its a no no not everythings about money like selling you a ballast you dont really need.Could be a REAL safety issue here.This is probably one of the best questions queries Ive seen on the forums anywhere.Phuuuuk I dont know,I wouldnt try it and I got a few 1000 ballasts doing zilch and a few 600 bulbs.I can see the 600 dont draw as much,but would the initial start blow the bulb,would it run for a while then blow dont know????My concern is the bulb shattering like a grenade,not just burning out.Wish I knew the correct answer Not saying you are wrong DJ you could be absolutely correct,I know it would run ,but would the 1000 ballast be too poweful for the 600 globe,can you see that side??? But if you have tried it and done it chime in please and let us know.Great question Suzie,wish I could be more accurate,just speculating here,never done it myself.


#7 mtbr

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 08:13 AM

Quote:

yes you can and its safe
1000w ballast can use 1000w bulb and down




Really? That's news to me. The only ballast/wattage I know is interchangeable is 400W/430W. Other than using conversion bulbs I have always read that the bulb and ballast wattage need to be matched.

Info from Sylvania:
Quote:

Ballasts and Warm-Up Time
Like any gaseous discharge light source, HID lamps have special electrical requirements that must be supplied by a ballast. With HID sources, however, the ballast must be specifically designed for the lamp type and wattage being used. In addition, HID lamps require a warm-up period to achieve full light output. Even a momentary loss of power can cause the system to restrike and have to warm up again—a process that can take several minutes. In applications where constant illumination is important for safety and security, a backup system is often required. The LUMALUX® Standby lamp offers instant restrike capabilities once power is restored, making it an ideal choice for applications where safety is a concern.




Temps inside HID bulbs reach 1500ºF and they burn under ~50psi. That scares me enough to match my ballast and bulb.


#8 Guest__*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 09:46 AM

Many municipalities use 100W HPS bulbs in 400W ballasts in their streetlights. They do this for longevity reasons.

The thing that everyone is afraid of is the bulb exploding, but let's look at this for a second.

Amperage is current, wattage is current put to work. One of the basic rules of electicity is that devices only draw as many amps as they need, regardless of how many are available. This is the reason why you can plug a simple 100W incandescent bulb in a single lamp into a 15A (or 20A, or 30A, or 40A...) circuit without the bulb detonating. The rating of the circuit is a measurement of its maximum safe load. You can add any number of devices in infinite combinations to that circuit, as long as you never draw more than 15A at a time (which usually translates to about 13A or so of steady draw because of startup currents)

So the wattage rating of the ballast is actually just the BIGGEST bulb that the ballast is capable of running. It tells you how much power the ballast can supply. You can use less with no problems, but using more will quickly burn out your ballast components.

Think of your ballast as a tiny little power transformer station. Just like the big stations that take 150KVolts off high-tension lines and step it down to the 110/220VAC for home use, the ballast takes that 'home' power and steps it up again so it can fire HID lamps.

As long as all of the components in the system are at or below nominal load, everything is fine. When you go over the rated load, you get fried ballasts, popped breakers, browouts, and blackouts, respectively.

You can always go under the rated limit, that only provides more headroom. Going over the rated limit is the dangerous area

And remember, most HPS bulbs are glass-encapsulated and UL listed to contain a burst within the outer capsule. MH lamps require an enclosed hood with tempered glass to get the same UL listing. Such a precaution is natural for any grower to take to protect against bulb bursts (which are a result of uneven bulb fatigue or power spikes, not ballast ratings)


#9 Guest__*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 10:40 AM

What an awesome question. I have been wondering this myself. I have a 1000w HPS, and my room is just too small to accommodate the heat that is given off by the light and the ballast. I am wanting to use a 400w bulb in this unit, and i will fill you all in on whether or not it works.
SUZIE, can you fill us in on whether your works or not too??


#10 Pepper_I

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 11:18 AM

The answer is no. The ballast serves three functions. It provides the proper starting voltage to establish the arc. Second, it supplies the proper voltage to operate the lamp. Third, the ballast limits the lamp current to a level prescribed by the lamp manufacturer for the particular type of lamp being used. Ballasts must always be matched to the particular lamp type, wattage, and line voltage being used. Never use a ballast for any lamp, installation or purpose other than for which it has been specifically designed.



#11 Mammoth

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 11:35 AM

I was at my local hydro store today and asked the owner (who I consider an expert) this question. He said you can use a lower wattage bulb in a higher wattage ballast, but you will cut that bulb's life in half because it is burn up all the gases in the bulb faster. He also said that you can use a higher wattge bulb in a smaller wattge ballast with no problems. Obviously it will only light up as much as the ballast.

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#12 Guest__*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 11:49 AM

I have a feeling that u can indeed use smaller bulbs in larger ballsts, but not sure...may try it one day...but not today...lol..

Quote:

Many municipalities use 100W HPS bulbs in 400W ballasts in their streetlights. They do this for longevity reasons.




a 1000bulb in a 400 ballast? isn't that the opposite?


#13 Mammoth

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 12:40 PM


Quote:

Many municipalities use 100W HPS bulbs in 400W ballasts in their streetlights. They do this for longevity reasons.




a 1000bulb in a 400 ballast? isn't that the opposite?




This is correct. If you put a higher wattage bulb in the lower watt ballast, it will burn at the lower wattage for a longer time. Cities may do this so they dont have to change the bulbs as frequent.

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#14 Guest__*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 12:42 PM

damn...i always thought that it was cool to run a 400 in a 100 but not the opposite....hmmm.....i could BEEN bought 1000's then...WTF!> i wish i woulda knew that then...


#15 Pepper_I

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 12:46 PM

I deleted my original post but basically it's best to match the ballast and bulb for best efficiency and safety.


#16 Guest__*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 12:48 PM

oh i understand...

yeah, i tend to still use the matching bulb/ballast!

holla!


#17 Fing_57

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 12:52 PM

Quote:


Quote:

Many municipalities use 100W HPS bulbs in 400W ballasts in their streetlights. They do this for longevity reasons.




a 1000bulb in a 400 ballast? isn't that the opposite?




This is correct. If you put a higher wattage bulb in the lower watt ballast, it will burn at the lower wattage for a longer time. Cities may do this so they dont have to change the bulbs as frequent.





he said ----------> 100w <---------- in a 400w Ballast
NOT 1000w


#18 Mammoth

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 02:02 PM

Sorry Fling. Youre right. That being said, it would not make sense. It would also not make sense to put a very low wattage bulb (100) in a 1000W ballast. It would fry it FAST!!

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#19 Guest__*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 06:29 PM

Quote:

Quote:


Quote:

Many municipalities use 100W HPS bulbs in 400W ballasts in their streetlights. They do this for longevity reasons.




a 1000bulb in a 400 ballast? isn't that the opposite?




This is correct. If you put a higher wattage bulb in the lower watt ballast, it will burn at the lower wattage for a longer time. Cities may do this so they dont have to change the bulbs as frequent.





he said ----------> 100w <---------- in a 400w Ballast
NOT 1000w




LMAO!!

My bad!! lol, i'm wasn't even high!
sorry, my goof


#20 Guest__*

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 08:07 PM

Quote:

Third, the ballast limits the lamp current to a level prescribed by the lamp manufacturer for the particular type of lamp being used




Where do you get that from? A ballast is just a step-up transformer, a capacitor, and in the case of an HPS, an ignitor.

None of those components regulate current.

Circuit breakers and fuses regulate current. As I've said before, current is a matter of draw. I'f you'd like an example, try plugging a single lamp socket into a 15A circuit in your house. Now screw in a 100W incandescent. Now try it with a 65W outdoor halogen spot. Now try it with a 13W CFL. Notice how they all work?

There seems to be some sort of belief that oversized transformers will somehow destroy a smaller bulb by overloading them in some way. This is not true. If you think so, I'd suggest you learn how a transformer works, so you'll understand that it just isn't possible for it to work that way...it violates the laws of electricity.