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Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s figure amongst the most horrendous neurodegenerative diseases that cause changes in the brain and create impediments to its normal functioning. The symptoms of Alzheimer’s include; partial or complete memory loss, inability to understand and respond, inability to focus and inability to act in other similar situations.
 

On the other hand, Parkinson’s causes decay of neurons that exist on the surface of the brain cells. Neurons act as messengers between the brain and the organs, limbs and parts of our body.  They convey messages to them to perform various functions, like hearing, eating, moving, sleeping, understanding & the other. In simple words, both of these two, cripple a person lifelong.
 

Just think of a person who has Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s conditions and imagine about the nightmare that he passes through. And so on, making a mentally or bodily crippled patient sits on a chair during the day & on the bed in the night and managing his needs has been much beyond a just ordeal that the attendants have to undergo for a period unknown to them.
 

As of today, there is no such conventional medicinal treatment that may stop the further decay or regenerate or rejuvenate the neurons or the brain cells already decayed due to these diseases. This is what makes the Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s as one of the most dreadful diseases. Unfortunately, both of these are affecting over 5 million people in America alone.
 

Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s: What Happens?
 

Alzheimer’s is the most common neurocognitive disorder of dementia. The disease is degenerative in nature. Mostly, people of the age 60 and above get affected by the Alzheimer’s.
 

An Alzheimer’s patient has to face a multitude of problems. There is a significant shift in his behavior. He is unable to complete even a simple task. He would not remember the place he had visited very recently then or the person with whom he was talking or the matter of the conversation. He fails to understand the things & the way to handle them. He can neither understand, nor respond.
 

Parkinson’s is a slow progressing disease. At the early stages, the symptoms are not so critical and the patient ignores them. As time rolls by, the condition of the patient goes on worsening. And when he decides to consult a physician, it’s too late. By that time, about 80% of the active neurons & brain cells have already decayed & there can’t be a come back. The patient faces tremors in the legs and shaking of the hands & limbs. He feels difficulty in maintaining the balance while standing or walking. He needs a full-time assistant for all the activities even related to his person.

Hallucinations and visionary illusions are common among the Parkinson’s patients. They feel and see which is not there. They are afraid of what does not exist.

Despite administering the best available medicines, the patient hardly responds to them or shows any signs of improvement.
 

Can Medical Cannabis Be Helpful in the Treatment of Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s?
 

Yet, contrary to the situation in conventional medical practices, Medical Marijuana Doctors see a ray of new hope in the cannabis. They are hopeful that this ill-famed herb has some of the inherent medicinal properties and contain some compounds (CBC, CBD & THC) that have one-to-one proximity to our internal endocannabinoid mechanisms (ECS) and carries the potential to put the brain-related disorders, including Alzheimer's & Parkinson's on the right track.
 

When the actual reasons behind Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s remains a mystery, the marijuana doctors are confident that this herb has the potentials to stop progressions of their conditions. Both of these diseases are directly related to the brain. It’s beyond doubts that cannabis effects on the brain most. It’s also not disputed in the scientific-research and medical circles that cannabis is not as bad as it carries the ill fame and has some of its inherent medicinal properties. Both scientific fields have already established some of its beneficial effects on brain-related mental ill-health conditions.

Some of these factors lead us to the discourse, whether cannabis could add a little benefit or contribute significantly to the treatment of the Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s specifically when currently, absolutely no conventional medicine is effective.

One of the major causes of the Parkinson’s is the decay of neurons, which act as messengers and convey signals from the nervous system to the vital organs and other parts of the body.
 

“Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets.”
 

The ECS is the largest cell receptor mechanism in our body. This mechanism controls the most important functioning part of our internal system. The researchers have established that ECS system was badly affected when neurons had died or decayed. They have further established that cannabis when consumed, cannabinoids (CBC, CBD & THC) available in it, engage this (ECS) system.
 

Studies conducted in the laboratories on mice showed that CBD compounds in cannabis could stop decay of healthy cells. The researchers have also found that CBD helps in the growth and development of the brain.
 

Studies on rats given a cannabinoid showed that cannabis stimulates the growth of new brain cells. Similar studies conducted by the Canadian researchers established that a regular use of cannabis caused neurons to regenerate in the hippo campus, an area that controls mood and emotions.

 

One main factor that contributes to the decay of cells and neurons is the inflammation in the brain. The cannabinoids in the cannabis have anti-inflammatory properties. Active compounds available in cannabis (THC, CBD & CBC) effect against both amyloid beta proteins and inflammation. They reduce and control the inflammation in the brain and consequently, stop the decay of the neurons.
 

When no conventional medicine is effective, patients trying on cannabis for the treatment of Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s have nothing to lose, but only to gain. Medical cannabis at least have the capacity to provide relief against pains, stiffness, jerks, trembles, spasms, sleeplessness, inflammation (in the brain) and other conditions that are related to these two diseases.

 

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One of my aunts has advanced Alzheimer's, so this is a topic of interest for me...

 

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On the other hand, Parkinson’s causes decay of neurons that exist on the surface of the brain cells. Neurons act as messengers between the brain and the organs, limbs and parts of our body.  They convey messages to them to perform various functions, like hearing, eating, moving, sleeping, understanding & the other. In simple words, both of these two, cripple a person lifelong.
 

 

Neurons are a type of brain cell, they're not on the surface of brain cells.  I think receptor is meant?  Except the "messengers" are neurotransmitters that turn on or off receptors...  messages pass along a neuron as a change in electrical charge, and when the charge gets to a synapse it then causes the release of one or more types of neurotransmitter that drift across the synapse to receptors in another neuron.  Then, based on that neuron's prior experience, it either stays silent or generates its own charge to pass down the chain.  Depending on the type of signal, this happens at speeds from 0.61 metres/sec (for pain signals) to 119 m/s (for muscle positioning).

 

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As of today, there is no such conventional medicinal treatment that may stop the further decay or regenerate or rejuvenate the neurons or the brain cells already decayed due to these diseases.

 

Some substances have been found to slow down the progress of Alzheimer's (I'm going to focus on that one because I know more about it).  Soy isoflavones surprisingly...  there's some actual evidence behind coffee / tea too...  some vitamins perhaps (D, B-complex, etc)...  a recent study suggests even alcohol, a *single* drink per day, helps kick into gear the body's garbage-removal and repair mechanisms and delays Alzheimer's too.  I was going to say metformin too (a diabetes drug) but looking that one up just now like I looked up the others, further studies are finding mixed results...  (please don't make me post links for all of these just now, my bed is calling...  besides these were all on the first page of Google hits for each one)

One of the recurring themes seems to be that Alzheimer's is an inflammatory condition, so, if cannabis helps, I think that's the mechanism by which it does.

 

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some compounds (CBC, CBD & THC) that have one-to-one proximity to our internal endocannabinoid mechanisms (ECS)

 

Can someone help me figure out what is meant by "one-to-one proximity to our internal endocannabinoid mechanisms"?  Describing which cannabinoids have an affinity for which receptors (and it goes beyond CB receptors) I can grok, but this...  eludes me.

 

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It’s beyond doubts that cannabis effects on the brain most.

 

 

Well, the "high" in the brain sure grabs most of the attention, but CB receptors exist on many different cell types, from immune cells to liver cells to keratinocytes.  And yes, it is thought that the majority of CB1 receptors are found in the brain, but CB2 is found everywhere (via the immune system), GPR18 is a new mystery one that seems to be involved in microglial migration through the CNS, and there's talk of renaming GPR55 to the CB3 receptor, and these are popping up in all sorts of tissues.  Probably one reason why cannabis has such broad effects (and they're not *all* pros, some can be cons if you're only wanting some and not the others, my father tried it for the first time for terminal cancer and, well, that's another story, it has pros and cons suffice it to say).

 

 

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One main factor that contributes to the decay of cells and neurons is the inflammation in the brain. The cannabinoids in the cannabis have anti-inflammatory properties. Active compounds available in cannabis (THC, CBD & CBC) effect against both amyloid beta proteins and inflammation. They reduce and control the inflammation in the brain and consequently, stop the decay of the neurons.
 

 

Has this been shown to happen in living people though?  One of the reasons Alzheimer's drugs keep failing drug trials is because, and we're just starting to wake up to this, removing the beta-amyloid plaques for some reason does not reverse or even stop the progression of the disease, and most drugs so far have targeted those plaques.  Anti-inflammatories have been shown to slow it down, and that's where CBD (and CBV and CBC) comes in.

 

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When no conventional medicine is effective, patients trying on cannabis for the treatment of Alzheimer’s & Parkinson’s have nothing to lose, but only to gain.

 

Dangerous words, preying upon people's desperation.  At least cannabis is physically non-toxic compared to some other things I've heard of, but it must be used with caution until we know if it actually helps and in what form it helps best.  How would an Alzheimer's patient tolerate the anticholinergic properties of THC?  Anticholinergics can really mess with memory, especially if other dementia-drugs haven't cleared out of their system yet.  Could make them agitated and even more delirious.  Maybe it works for some, but would it be worth the potential cons for others?  And anyone thinking of trying this out, hopefully they know to start low and don't ignore undesirable side-effects until they become an issue...  (so, yeah, I just wish I'd had more time to ease my father into it, but he only had 5 weeks, not really time to get anywhere with it comfortably)

I'd definitely want more research before making blanket recommendations.  I'd also want to know which cannabinoids interact most with that GPR18 receptor, if it's not THC, maybe we're looking at CBD or a CBx-mixture for these conditions, we could have not only anti-inflammatory action but maybe even some regeneration of glial cells too (the support cells of the brain).

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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. It is a progressive and degenerative disease that affects the patient’s memory, thinking and ability to interact socially. It affects about 1 in 10 people over 65 years, and almost 1 in 4 people over 85 years.
 

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the hundred compounds found in the cannabis plant that belongs to a class of chemicals called cannabinoids. However, CBD does not produce any psychoactive effects like the other known cannabinoid called THC. CBD possesses neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. These properties can be therapeutically beneficial for reducing the cognitive and functional impairment that occurs with Alzheimer’s disease.
 

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I never did get into videos as replacement for articles, more of a text person.  More facts, less emotion, usually, heh, helps me organize and digest them...  I'll see if I can find a transcript, some videos have them now...

Ah, yes 🙂
 

[snip]

01:54 one of the
01:57 key factors in Alzheimer's disease is
02:00 the existence of beta amyloid proteins

 

Well, the evidence is now pointing to them being a symptom of whatever is causing Alzheimer's, not a cause, since experimental drugs that remove the beta-amyloid plaques do not seem to help.

 

[snip]

02:16 the psychoactive
02:19 compound in cannabis
02:20 tetrahydrocannabinol THC slows beta
02:24 amyloid production

 

Or any CBD that is present, or perhaps CBC (I'm more and more curious about CBC and CBV these days), is targeting the root problem which also reduces the symptom of plaques.

 

02:26 when applied in the right
02:28 dose

 

They're not going to tell us?  Or is this basically what I'm saying, more research and soon!

 

02:28 a report published in molecular
02:30 pharmaceutics in 2006 theorized that
02:34 cannabinoids might be shedding the
02:35 amyloid plaque from affected neurons

 

Yeah, I remember that study...  it didn't hold up for the same reason none of the other beta-amyloid-targeting drugs didn't hold up...

 

02:44 considerably superior inhibitor of
02:46 amyloid beta aggression this finding was
02:51 supported by 2013 2014 and 2016 study
02:55 gradually conducted the Ross Kamp
02:57 Institute University of Florida

 

Nevermind this study is only preliminary and not peer-reviewed (I found it at salk.edu)...  OK, it's reducing ONE symptom, what about the others like memory loss?  So...

 

02:59 a 2006 study revealed the
03:03 THC stimulated appetite and reduced
03:06 nighttime agitation providing relief for
03:08 Alzheimer's patients another study from
03:11 the Journal of Alzheimer's disease
03:12 reported that cannabis extract does
03:15 reduce the negative symptoms of
03:16 Alzheimer's

 

But is it "cannabis extract" or THC or CBD or what?  Structured research, let's nail down exactly how this works so we don't waste precious time guessing and tinkering with each patient!

 

[snipped out the advertising at the end]

 

I can't find the study from 2006 they refer to...  I do know the elderly *can* tolerate cannabis just fine, there's a few original hippies at my favourite cafe... man...  not much to say now, just sit and watch and occasionally nod their head sagely...  but Alzheimer's changes the whole equation.   I'd like to see the actual numbers, dosages, methods of ingestion, any reported adverse effects and how common or rare they were, stuff I can chew on and add to my arguments. 🙂  If a few large studies all generally agree that there's no real downside, I'm all on board.  Until then, well, do whatever works, so long as it works.  Keep a close eye on things... I personally keep a logbook of pretty much everything that enters my body (even information) and how I feel over the following days, I wonder how many elderly get that sort of attention, the conditions under which my grandmother died were atrocious (and my father was basically ignored by medical professionals until terminal, "Oh, oops, you DO have cancer, sorry, well, want a quick death at least?")

Um, yeah... Anyway!  I'm a fan of cannabis, I think everyone here knows that, but I get a bit edgy when people recommend it for EVERYTHING/EVERYONE... I appreciate the enthusiasm, I really do, but I also don't want the general public to backlash when some of the promises don't come true.

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Coconut oil removes the protein plaques on the neurons as well as cannabis. Sugar and refined carbohydrates causes inflammation in are atereis and blood vessels,  Dementia is being called type 3 diabetes now.

 

A lot of dementia is caused by the use of statin drugs, which block cholesterol production. The brain and heart require cholesterol to function healthily.

 

Calcification of blood vessels leads to reduced blood flow to the brain also causing parts of the brain to die off.

 

Cholesterol has been named as the problem causing these blockages and reduction in blood flow to the brain and heart but sugar is the culprit, causing the damage, cholesterol does its job repairing the damage, then calcium attaches to the cholesterol and eventualy blocks the blood vessels.

 

People who lack vitamin K2 and D3, don't move calcium out of their blood stream, to bones and teeth where it should go. So it stays in the blood stream looking for a new home.

 

So if you wish to avoid dementia reduce your sugar intake and eat foods with vit K2 and D3, and avoid statin drugs like the plague.

 

 

 

 

 

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So basically get some exercise outside and don't eat complete garbage...  my maternal grandmother did love to garden, and cooked everything from scratch, although some health nuts might be horrified at what that diet included, heh, but it kept her going to 93...

So, um, please don't take this the wrong way...  If one wishes to avoid contributing to the coconut monocultures that are replacing island jungles (why does the west have this fixation with jungle products, from coconuts to palm oil to hardwoods to, well, yeah), here are some more-sustainable alternatives 🙂:  hemp seed oil, grapeseed oil, olive oil, sunflower oil...  hemp seed oil and sunflower oil even have a good chance of being found nearby in some areas...  for cosmetic use apricot kernel oil is often overlooked, and helps use up agricultural waste that would otherwise just rot while easing pressures on more exotic oils.

I don't know which of those oils or combination of oils would most closely resemble the ratio of fats found in coconut oil, but I could try and find out if anyone really wants to know.

If a person's health truly depends on it, then I won't begrudge their use of it, I mean my daily cannabis use is not exactly environmentally friendly either, that electricity could be offsetting fossil-fuel use elsewhere...

 

Thing is, my maternal grandmother lived to 93 without ever having tasted a coconut as far as I know, heh...  mind would have been sharp as a tack right until the end too if she hadn't broken a hip a few years before the end, they never even tried to wean her off the pain meds after the replacement...  maternal grandfather made it to late 80s despite diabetes and no will power and his decision at around age 70 that he'd walked enough in his life and was going to sit in his chair from then on (don't really blame him, he was sent to Siberia for like 30 years for allowing himself to be conscripted by the German army instead of getting shot, he wasn't even Russian so, like, eh?)...  he was sucking candy right to the end...  whereas my paternal grandparents spent the better part of their lives in Africa and ate many a coconut, but smoking did them in in their late 60s and early 70s... 

 

I guess my point is, if your body is actually lacking something, then yeah, use whatever it needs, but when everybody jumps on board regardless of actual need, it puts pressure on precious resources.  Heh, so, my feelings re: cannabis legalization and everyone jumping on board that precious resource, well, hopefully there will be more focus on outdoor growing now, reduce electricity use a bit.

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3 hours ago, Shadey said:

So if you wish to avoid dementia reduce your sugar intake and eat foods with vit K2 and D3, and avoid statin drugs like the plague.

 

And this is good advice generally...  foods with Kx are usually leafy-greens and a lot of people don't get enough of those... food with Dx are usually meat/dairy?  I prefer to get mine via my skin and UV (one also gets cholesterol sulphate this way too, and AFAIK there's no particular food that supplies that)...  😉  And statin drugs are a total scam, guess what the recent findings show?  Reducing LDL using drugs (so, statins or fibrates) doesn't reduce heart disease for some reason, it really does seem to require exercise to get those benefits.  Plus I don't know anyone who hasn't had serious side-effects from statins...  And yet it seems every second or third article I read in the trade journals is an exciting new potential pill that'll replace exercise...  never pans out.

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I am all for sustainable food resources, I have been a vegetarian for the last 26 years.

 

Coconut oil has a unique fatty acid that is able to pass through the blood brain barrier. This makes it an ideal brain food. The fact that it not only stops further damage by the protein plaques, it has in some cases reversed the damage.

 

My mother developed dementia after 8 years of statin and metphormin use. Once she was dependant on us to make her food, we had her diabetes controlled to the point she didn't need the metformin, but the damage was done bye then with the statins.

 

You can find K2 in high quantities in fermented foods as well. D3 is in a lot of Omega 3 fatty acids as well as sunshine. They both work hand in hand with each other helping absorption.

 

 

 

 

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My understanding is that the medium-chain fatty acids aren't unique to coconuts, they just have a higher concentration than normal.  I'm searching to see what else does too...  besides sea life...  olives seem to on first search, might partly explain the benefits of the Mediterranean diet...

D3 isn't found in plants (unless I'm totally missing it, if you know for sure can you link me?)... seeing it listed in all sorts of animals... even mushrooms...  no plant sources though.  Are you sure the omega-3s aren't actually precursors to D3?  Like how beta-carotene is a precursor to vitamin A?

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I recently got some organic, Nutiva brand, MCT oil to make my cocobudder with.  It's made from coconut oil but is always liquid and 93% Medium Chain Triglycerides.  Doesn't have that coconut taste some people don't like either.  Expensive compared to coconut oil tho.  I got 3 - 473ml bottles on sale for $18 each when I can buy a 2.48L can of organic virgin coconut oil at Costco for around $24.

 

Pretty sure Omega3s don't break down to D3.  D3 tablets are cheap and I take 3 - 5, 1000IU tabs a day along with a couple 1200mg Alaska salmon oil capsules.  Also add some MCT and flax oils to my food for brain health.  Don't want another stroke and damned if I'll take an aspirin every day as it has links to cancer when taken regularly.  I take a bunch of other supplements too like B-complex, iron, zinc, magnesium etc.

 

Found out just 3 years ago that my birth mother died at 75 after 10 years of dementia.  Almost 64 now so glad I'm into pot and have been for 50 years so maybe I don't have to go out that way.  No info at all about my birth father so I live in blissful ignorance about any surprises from his side of the family. :)

 

peace.gif

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20 minutes ago, LabRat said:

Pretty sure Omega3s don't break down to D3.

 

I wonder if they get something added to them to make D3, like how D1 and D2 are made from cholesterol?  And, yeah, D3 tablets are cheap, but don't include the other Ds (although I can't find a definitive answer on whether or not a healthy person needs all three or can the body adapt the one to the others), or cholesterol sulphate.  Although D1 and D2 tablets exist too I think, heh...

 

Fascinating find on that MCT oil.  I need to look into that.  But I'm still going to be keeping an eye out for sources a little closer to home... 😉

 

 

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Not sure about the other forms of Vit. D but from all I've read it's D3 is what you need to supplement if you don't get much sun.  As far north as we are there's only about a month each year where sun exposure will actually create vit D naturally.  Being a redhead I've avoided sun exposure most of my life as I burn in 15 min out in the summer sun and have already had one small patch of skin cancer removed from my rt. leg over 20 years ago.  Think I have a few more need dealing with but getting anything done about them is not easy up here.  Squamous cell carcinoma was what the one removed turned out to be so not too scary.

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Ah, the ol' squamous cell carcinoma... I have to get another one of those removed I think...  legs too, eh?  Why the legs, mine are always covered with pants, well almost...

 

I don't burn though.  Just keep tanning until autumn arrives...   I read somewhere that even at UK latitudes (it was a UK magazine) a Caucasian gets enough D through face and forearms after about 20 minutes.  Can't recall if that was an average or in summer...

My father died through a series of unfortunate events, the end result of treating patients like assembly-line parts instead of actually listening to them...  one thing that turned up shortly before his death, because his ribs kept rebreaking after his heart valve replacement, was he was deficient in D.  And you know, his mind was kind of going too...  definite signs of early Alzheimer's so maybe it was a mercy that pancreatic cancer got him, I dunno, he thought so (well... technically it was suffocation from rocuronium, our government legalized euthanasia and allows suffocation from paralysis as the way out?  seriously?  I tried to warn him what he was in for, but he didn't want to rock the boat...  when my time comes it's gonna be inert gas, breathe free and easy right until the heart stops, survivors of accidents involving inert gas say it's like the ultimate booze-up).

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I got a lot of sunburns as a kid and young adult and rode my bike everywhere while wearing shorts so the tops of thighs got a lot of sun exposure.  That's where the cancer was.  Another suspicious patch is just inches away from the scar of the one removed and a couple more on the other leg tho more on the inside of the lower thigh.  Couple on my shoulders too.  Nothing that looks like melanoma tho thank Jah!

 

I know I sure won't wait for a long lingering death in the hospital.  My best buddy died a few years ago from pancreatic cancer and I suspect it was one of the drugs he took for his diabetes or the 2L of aspartame laced cokes he drank every day.  Heavy smoker that didn't eat well and was very overweight tho the cancer took care of that quick enough.

 

I have plans to wander off in the bush in the dead of winter with a bag of pot and 40oz bottle of Jamaican rum should I decide it's time to go.  I've almost froze to death twice now and it's a very easy way to check out and won't leave a mess like eating my shotgun would.  ;) We have legal death by doctor here now but no provisions for euthanasia for late stage dementia.  I'd sign up for that if I were ever to be diagnosed. and it was an option.  Waking up dead in the morning would be best tho. :D

 

 

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Anecdotal, but my mother is still alive, and still motoring along.  She did inherit her father's Type II diabetes but is so far controlling it through diet and exercise alone (her doctor wouldn't believe it at first, had her on about 3 different meds, threatened to stop seeing her if she didn't comply but after several months it became apparent that a patient *can* change their lifestyle instead of using pills, it wasn't a fluke).

 

Despite a number of physical issues that date back decades, she was somehow in better shape than my Dad for the last several years, and I think it's all the gardening that does it.  Exercise, fresh veggies, and D vitamins.  Oh, and how many 75-year-olds are still learning new computer tricks (remember that she'd only seen electricity for about 10 years before marrying)?  She sometimes awes her friends. 🙂

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My mom turns 91 in two weeks and is still sharp tho getting pretty grumpy in her dotage.  Been legally blind for 20 years from macular degeneration but still gardens a lot and keeps herself busy.  I attribute my fairly good health to being fed fresh garden veggies for my whole life at home.  Wasn't a lot of junk food back in those days tho I was and still am a sugar junkie.

 

The whole world is getting obese fast and diabetes is only one of many diseases obesity causes and most can be reversed or halted through diet and exercise.  Very little is being addressed regarding preventative health education as Big pHARMa wants us sick and dependent and collude with Big Food to keep us addicted to the junk they call food and make us fat and ill.  Not me tho.  I haven't had a Big Mac in over 30 years and stopped all sodas etc more than a decade ago. At 63 I can still wear jeans I wore when I was 18.  32" waist and a full head of hair yet even with my abnormally high testosterone levels.  My birth mom and dad must have had some decent genes I guess tho my birth father is described as heavy and short in the little notes I have with my adoption papers.

 

Smoking is my worst health issue and the wife and I have both agreed to quit once we run out of this leaf tobacco we have left so maybe another month.  My right lung has already collapsed twice so I'd like avoid another and I was diagnosed with early COPD at the first collapse 5 years ago.

 

Mom only uses her old Vista computer for Spider Solitaire now as she can't read anything and relies on audio books for her reading now.  Damn near deaf too.

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