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Over 4,000 now able to grow medical cannabis

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Over 4,000 now able to grow medical cannabis

 

As of May 1 there were 4,480 Canadians with active registrations for personal or designated cannabis cultivation. 17 new employees hired to help process.


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By David Brown  
May 8, 2017 


Enrolment in Health Canada’s personal cultivation program has nearly doubled in less than three months, according to new figures from the agency. To handle this, Health Canada’s Office of Medical cannabis recently hired 17 new employees to help with processing and responding to questions.

 

As of May 1, there are now 4,480 Canadians with active registrations for personal or designated cultivation under the agency’s medical cannabis access program. The regulator says the average wait time is now ten weeks, although many patients still report waiting four months or more in some cases. Under the program, Health Canada authorizes registered patients to grow their own cannabis or choose a designated grower.

 

Enrolment is up significantly from figures Health Canada provided to Lift earlier this year, showing 2,554 individuals allowed to grow their own cannabis or designate someone to do so, with average processing time being about seven weeks.

 

In response to a request from Lift, Health Canada has provided an update on their personal and designated cultivation licensing program. Lift has been covering this issue since February, looking at wait times that have, according to several patients and physicians, been several months.

 

Gary Scott Holub, Media Relations Officer for the Government of Canada, says the wait times are dependent on the amount of applications received, as well as if the applications are processed properly by the patient and physician. The agency says they have provided expanded instructions for patients on filling out the associated forms.

 

Examples of commonly encountered issues include:

medical documents that do not appear to be original;

discrepancies between information in the medical document and the application form;

documents that are not signed by the applicant, or are signed incorrectly; or

the incorrect person is identified as the designated producer.

 

Holub says Health Canada began accepting applications for personal or designated cultivation in August 2016 and had 15 full time employees working on processing applications for home growing and designated growers during the 2016-2017 fiscal year (ending March 31), out of 74 employees at the Office of Medical Cannabis. They have recently hired 11 new client service representatives to help process applications, and six new client service representatives to respond to questions from Canadians about how to apply, or the status of their application.

 

Health Canada’s 2017–18 Departmental Plan says they intend to address gaps in regulatory programs like the medical cannabis program and “restore legislative and policy capacity.” Spending for Health Canada has been increasing.

 

You can read the Q and A below. It has been edited for clarity.

 

Q1: What are the most current figures for Licenses issued for personal cultivation and for designated production under the ACMPR?

A1: As of May 1, 2017, there were 4,480 individuals with active Health Canada registrations under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations. This includes 4,148 individuals authorized to produce limited amounts of cannabis for their own medical purposes and 332 individuals who have designated someone to produce it for them.

 

Q2: How many staff are involved in the personal cultivation approval process?

A2: The Office of Medical Cannabis (OMC) in Health Canada is responsible for developing and implementing legislation, regulations, policies and operational programs that support access to cannabis for medical purposes. As part of these responsibilities, OMC issues registration certificates to Canadians who are authorized by their health care practitioner to produce a limited amount of cannabis for their own medical purposes or on behalf of another individual.

 

During fiscal year 2016-17, OMC employed 74 individuals, 15 of whom worked full-time on the review of applications and issuance of registration certificates since the new program’s inception on August 24, 2017. Health Canada has recently added 11 new client service representatives to the registration team to increase the team’s capacity to process new and renewal applications from Canadians in a timely manner.

 

Q3: Lift has been consistently hearing reports of patients waiting several months to get their paperwork approved by Health Canada. Are there specific reasons why such approvals could take several months? What does the approval process entail once a patient’s paperwork makes its way to Health Canada?

 

A3: On average, the processing time is 10 weeks, depending on the complexity of the application. In some cases, the application is processed more quickly or, as you have noted, it can take longer.

 

The time to review an application and issue a registration certificate is highly dependent upon the number of applications received, and the quality or the completeness of the applications. It also depends on the response time of applicants or health care practitioners, who may be contacted by our client service representatives to verify information or to request additional clarification.

To ensure the requirements specified in the regulations are met, Health Canada must validate the information on the application and the medical document. For example, our client service representatives verify that an original medical document has been provided, that it has been signed by a healthcare practitioner who is authorized by, and in good standing with, a provincial regulatory authority, and that the medical document has not been altered or falsified in any way.

 

For the benefit of your readers, who may also be applicants, examples of commonly encountered issues include:
•medical documents that do not appear to be original;
•discrepancies between information in the medical document and the application form;
•documents that are not signed by the applicant, or are signed incorrectly; or
•the incorrect person is identified as the designated producer.

 

To assist patients, the Department has posted a guidance document that provides instructions on how to correctly complete the registration form. In response to patient feedback, Health Canada has also recently updated the sample medical document that individuals can take to their health care practitioner to be completed as an original medical document. Both documents can be found here: www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/topics/production-cannabis-for-your-own-medical-purposes.

 

As indicated above, Health Canada has recently added 11 new client service representatives to the registration team. An additional 6 client service representatives have also joined the call centre to help respond to questions from Canadians about how to apply or the status of their application.

 

Health Canada will continue to work with patients and patient advocates to identify and act on opportunities to improve the processing of applications from individuals authorized to produce cannabis for their own medical purposes. We are committed to taking additional measures as necessary to ensure all applications are processed as expeditiously as possible.

 

Q4: Once a patient has authorization to purchase starting materials from a licensed producer, how often may they purchase their limit in clones or seeds based on their grams-per-day authorization from their doctor? (assuming crop failure, etc.).

 

A4: Only those individuals who have registered with Health Canada to produce a limited quantity of cannabis for their own medical purposes or to designate someone to produce it for them are permitted to purchase starting materials (plants and seeds) from licensed producers. A designated person is not permitted to register with a licensed producer to purchase starting materials.

The registration certificate provided by Health Canada will indicate the number of cannabis plants that an individual or their designated person, if any, can produce, and this number will determine how much starting materials the registered individuals can purchase. For example, the total number of plants you order from a licensed producer cannot be more than the number authorized on your registration certificate. If you want to order seeds, you may order 3 marijuana seeds for each authorized plant. For example, if you are authorized to produce 5 plants, you may purchase a maximum of 15 seeds. Also, you can order plants and seeds more than once. If your crop is not successful, you can place another order with the same licensed producer for more plants or seeds, but you cannot have more plants at your site than the number identified on your registration certificate.

 

In addition, the regulations enable individuals, once registered, to obtain an interim supply from a licensed producer while they wait for their plants to produce harvestable product. Individuals registered with Health Canada can become clients of a licensed producer by using a copy of their Health Canada registration certificate to register. Individuals may also continue to access cannabis from a licensed producer while producing their own plants as long as the possession limit of the lesser of 150 grams or 30 times the daily quantity of dried marijuana (or the equivalent in products) is not exceeded. Individuals can only use a Health Canada registration certificate to register with one licensed producer to access interim supply.

 

lift

 

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4 hours ago, notsofasteddie said:

On average, the processing time is 10 weeks

I am 10 weeks this week so I think I will give them another call. They said 3 weeks ago that it was to early to know anything as I wasnt even in the system then.

Its good to know about still being able to get a supply while growing and you can repeat purchase if you screw up your grow.

 

Just called them and they said they received my application March 17th I sent it Feb 24th I cant believe it took all that time for them to get it. Its still early as far as they are concerned, I am to check back in another 3 weeks to see what is happening. So we are at 7 and a half weeks since they say they received it :(

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Quote

Individuals may also continue to access cannabis from a licensed producer while producing their own plants as long as the possession limit of the lesser of 150 grams or 30 times the daily quantity of dried marijuana (or the equivalent in products) is not exceeded.

Wow this goes completely against what I was told when I registered

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1 hour ago, Shadey said:

I am 10 weeks this week so I think I will give them another call.

 

I sent mine in Feb 7 and nada so far, good luck!

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I'm still on the fence about applying but it looks like the medical regs are going to remain the same regardless what happens with the new recreational laws coming up.

 

The idiots that made the application form filled all the boxes for birth-date etc with YYYY/MM/DD so there isn't room to write in the dates.  Are you supposed to use a felt pen to write on top or squeeze it in so they can't read it and reject your application.

 

I've heard that they will back-date your grow permit to the date you got your form signed by a doctor.  So do you get a renewal from your doctor 10 or more weeks before applying for renewal to grow?  I got my doctor's letter last August just after the latest regs came into effect so if I applied now I'll have only a couple months of grow time left before having to get a new doctor permit and then apply for a new grow permit.  That would mean I'll likely have a month or more that I won't be legal while waiting the 10 or more weeks for a fresh permit.  Catch-22 if I ever saw one.

 

I think I'll just make sure I get a new doctor's permit and say fuggit to applying for a grow permit.  On my 17th year of growing here without problems so might as well just keep going as before.

 

Why is government shit so f'ed up? :mad:

 

:peace:

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I went through the process last year.  When I received my license it was dated effective the day the doctor signed my recommendation so yes you lose out on the processing time.

 

I would not hesitate to apply under the ACMPR.  You are correct when you say you have grown for X years without issue.  Having a license means absolute freedom to carry, posses and use it like tobacco if you wish.  It was quite revolutionary to my experience.  In effect, life-changing.

 

 When I finally received my license for some reason I received a duplicate so one hangs proudly outside my cabinet and one I can use to carry with me.  Fuck man, I can fly on commercial planes in Canada with 120 grams, legally.  How cool is that?  My only restrictions are I can't sell it or give it away.

 

The medical system will allow far more than the 4 plant limit proposed by the government as it stands now IMHO. 

 

 

 

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I don't understand your reply.  I can carry, grow, store and smoke without problem.  Licensed by Health Canada.

 

That doesn't sound broken at all.  It sounds like a dream come true.IMG_20170426_090154.thumb.jpg.2f159e1b0febe9b15e2801e5f1fd93f6.jpg

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25 minutes ago, Unregistered said:

Supporting a broken system only serves to perpetuate it.

 

 

It is the only system we have at the moment and Trudeau the Younger says there are no plans to change it for the foreseeable future so it's go with what we have or, like me, stay in the grow closet and risk arrest and all that goes with it.

 

The part of the system I hate and for sure will never be part of is buying pot from LPs or any corporate weed dealers.  If they don't allow smaller growers to participate the war on drugs will just keep going as it did with bootleggers back in the day and to a much smaller extent still continues.  Illegal tobacco is getting bigger all the time as they keep raising the "sin" taxes and I'd be getting that if I knew someone dealing it.

 

I think I'll wait until I get a renewal for my medpot then file to grow.  Maybe the wait times will be reduced by the fall.

 

:peace:

 

 

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On 5/18/2017 at 2:56 AM, Squilly said:

I went through the process last year.  When I received my license it was dated effective the day the doctor signed my recommendation so yes you lose out on the processing time.

 

I would not hesitate to apply under the ACMPR.  You are correct when you say you have grown for X years without issue.  Having a license means absolute freedom to carry, posses and use it like tobacco if you wish.  It was quite revolutionary to my experience.  In effect, life-changing.

 

 When I finally received my license for some reason I received a duplicate so one hangs proudly outside my cabinet and one I can use to carry with me.  Fuck man, I can fly on commercial planes in Canada with 120 grams, legally.  How cool is that?  My only restrictions are I can't sell it or give it away.

 

The medical system will allow far more than the 4 plant limit proposed by the government as it stands now IMHO. 

 

 

 

 

What really irks me is this yearly renewal for both the doc's recommendation then renewing your grow permit.  With the wait times at Hellth Canada it's so easy to have a lapse of legality for a month or more waiting for HC's approval.  Not to mention that should they decide to do more inspections it would be just like them to inspect when they know you are waiting for that approval.  By there rules you have to dispose of all your plants and any pot you have in storage until all the permits are in place.  Like anyone will do that but then they face the chance they could get busted in the interim.

 

Once you apply with HC you are on the federal gov'ts hit list and that is something I don't want to be on in case things go sideways.

 

:peace:

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I too dislike the renewal process.  On the other hand BC requires me to see a doctor every 90 days for a renewal on the most common of blood pressure medications.

 

The wait time is different but if we truly want to be taken seriously as medical cannabis patients, whatever that means to you, you have to follow a process.  That is really no different than any other prescription.

 

 

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It really is different than a prescription tho.  For one thing it's not a prescription.  It's a recommendation from your doctor that you be allowed to use cannabis to treat what ails you.  It also doesn't have a Drug Identification Number, DIN, so is treated much differently than drugs that do.

 

Getting a doctor up here to sign off has been impossible so I either have to pay an outrageous price to get some Skype doc to do it or travel out of province like I did last year to get one to sign and just bill my medical for the two visits needed to get it done.  Name another drug that makes you jump through so many hoops to acquire.

 

It still boggles my mind that my family doctor feels qualified enough to prescribe me any number of mind bending drugs to treat my depression.  Something I don't think an MD is any where's near qualified to do.  But when I ask about getting him to sign he claims he doesn't know enough about pot to feel qualified to give me the OK.  Even when I tell him I've been self-medicating with it for years and just want that piece of paper so I don't get busted if caught with a small bag of bud.  Talk about hypocrisy.

 

The new penalties being brought in with recreational legality are just to keep the cops, lawyers and corporate assholes that are trying to corner the pot market happy.  Still going to be handing out criminal records to anyone that doesn't toe the line and that means a lot of people getting busted for a plant.  Until pot is as free to grow and consume as tomatoes it's all just smoke and mirrors to make sure the Libtards get voted in again by the same suckers that fell for the legal pot song the first time.

 

And what if the Libs don't get in and we get another Harper running the country?  We all know what that can mean.

 

I'm probably just being paranoid but I don't trust those bastards as far as I could throw them. :)

 

:peace:

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...sounds like a broken system to me.

 

My pot doc said the 90-day prescription renewal was on Health Canada, but family docs not knowing enough about it to prescribe is coming from the Alberta College of Physicians and Surgeons (or so the GP told me). The clinic housing the pot doc thinks they will be able to have pot on site in the future; talks involve them, the College, and Health Canada.

 

@Squilly

When things are not reasonable then something is broken, if it is not the logic then it must be the system the logic describes. Does it seem reasonable that anyone can go to the garden center and purchase plants that are deadly poison but I need a prescription, registration, and have regulations to follow if I want to grow a non-toxic, apparently healthful plant. Logical inconsistencies like that just spill out of the proposed system and existing regulations because they are built into its design - there is no equivalency or even well defined correspondence between things like: how much yield you get from a plant, how potent the dried plant is, or how many nanograms of THC per milliliter of blood it takes to impair someone - yet they are trying to regulate how many plants you can grow and how much pot you can store, how much of any sample of plant material you should need, and how anyone's body will respond to a given amount of THC at any time.

 

What is and what's coming is better than what was, but it is not what it could or perhaps even should be. I suppose you could call that `arguably broken'. They are continuing with the same prohibition for a large segment of the toking population and a (so far, afaict) similar strategy, which will not accomplish their aim of shutting down/out the black market. That's really broken. Restrictions that are effectively unenforceable (e.g., number of plants you can grow) are broken by design. etc.

 

[my assumptions]

If they have based the system on questionable or bad assumptions then no amount of tweaking will be able to fix it.

If their assumptions were close to reality the resulting breakage would mostly be at the edges, corner cases, extreme situations, small cracks in the system...

 

...but it looks broken in some way, everywhere and from whatever direction I look at it from. So I gotta question whether it is worth trying to tweak, or would we be better off simply rejecting the proposal.

 

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finally got my certificate from Health Canada after 7 months waiting.

Amusingly it came with a flier advising that renewals be sent in at least 6 weeks before your prescription ends.

lol

 

15 plants here we come!

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7 months is nuts.  Damn near run out of time on your medical certificate before you get a permit to grow.  It ought to automatic that once you have your medical and have applied to grow you can start your garden with the limits set out by how many grams per day you have.  My medical runs out Aug.16 so hoping I can get a doc to sign again to renew that.  Maybe I should apply to grow now and get a jump on it even tho my medical runs out soon.

 

Found out a doc here that I asked to sign about 5 years ago has had his first training in medpot and is right now back in Sask. getting the final part of that training.  The same doc that refused to sign because in his experience in South Africa training at a mental hospital most of the patients were there because they were driven insane from smoking pot. :D

 

Maybe he will be willing to renew me but I'm not very optimistic that he will let me keep my 8g/day limit.  I want the 40 plant limit so I can play around with breeding as I have for years and often have lots of little plants that mostly get tossed out after selecting the few that make the grade.

 

I haven't really heard anything about anyone getting busted if they get caught with a grow and their grow permit is late showing up even tho they applied at least 6 weeks ahead for a renewal.

 

Wonder how long it's going to take to get a permit for the four plants they are planning to allow rec users to grow once the new laws pass if they do.  Gonna be a hell of a flood of applications much larger than that with med patients.  Stupid that they make any of us register at all.  It's not like they run around inspecting anyone.  It's just if you get caught by chance like a break-in or house fire.  Plenty of indoor veggie growers and they don't have to register or limit their plant counts or heights.

 

Congrats on finally getting yours! :happydance:

 

:peace:

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1 hour ago, midnightMix said:

finally got my certificate from Health Canada after 7 months waiting.

Congratulations, I am at 16-17 weeks now, my prescription was renewed 2 weeks ago, I will give them another call monday see what they say. I spoke to them about 3-4weeks ago again, and they said it was being worked on, call back, if I dont here anything in the next few weeks :(

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22 hours ago, LabRat said:

...

Maybe he will be willing to renew me but I'm not very optimistic that he will let me keep my 8g/day limit.  I want the 40 plant limit so I can play around with breeding as I have for years and often have lots of little plants that mostly get tossed out after selecting the few that make the grade.

 

I will be sticking with Natural Health Services - they have their own doctors, are not associated with any LP, and are grower friendly. The only fee is for submitting grow permit paperwork to Health Canada ($25, iirc). The first visit was face-to-face, followups can be via video conference. When I asked for my 2g/day prescription to be upped to 6g/day (to keep within the grow regulations), they bumped it up to 8g/day because I hadn't allowed enough for unforeseen losses.

 

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I might have to check these guys out.  I see they have a clinic in Edmonton so I'll contact them there and see what it would cost me to get a renewal and maybe file for growing as well.

 

Thanks Unregistered!

 

:peace:

 

 

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15 minutes ago, LabRat said:

I might have to check these guys out.  I see they have a clinic in Edmonton so I'll contact them there and see what it would cost me to get a renewal and maybe file for growing as well.

It will cost the price of getting to the first visit, AHC covers the appointment just like with any other doctor.

 

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Just called HC about my application. They said 90% complete, :)  call back if I don't receive anything in the post in the next 2-3 weeks.

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Enrollment in Canada’s personal cannabis cultivation program continues to grow

 

Health Canada has hired over 30 new employees to handle the influx, but many patients say they are still waiting several months for approval


By David Brown  
July 11, 2017 


30517645156_25c7abf018_b-1024x670.jpg
Featured image by Aram Vatian


According to new information from Health Canada, as of June 16, 2017, there were 6,225 active registration certificates issued by Health Canada for individuals to produce a limited amount of cannabis for their own medical purposes. Of these 6,225 registrants, says a Health Canada representative, 5,760 individuals were registered to produce cannabis for their own medical purposes and 465 individuals have designated persons to produce cannabis for them.

 

The program, introduced in August of last year, once again introduced legislation that allows patients who register with Health Canada to grow a limited number of plants for their own purpose, or to designate an authorized grower to do so for them. Health Canada had formerly allowed home production under a previous medical marijuana regime, the Medical Marihuana Access Regulations (MMAR), but halted new applications with the introduction of the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR) in 2014.

 

Interest in the program quickly created a backlog, with over 2,500 people seeking to register in the first six months or so, and over 4,000 by May, forcing Health Canada to hire 17 new employees to help manage the process. The regulator now says they added 21 individuals in April and May of this year and an additional 11 employees in June.

 

Health Canada admits processing times can take from 2-4 months, ‘depending on the complexity of the application.’ In February, they said the average wait time was seven weeks, which included earlier processing times in the first weeks of registration.

 

Lift exchanged emails with many Canadians who applied to the system and say they have been waiting even longer. Medical cannabis patients Lift spoke to earlier this year reported waiting several months, and some of those patients we contacted recently say they are still waiting.

 

One medical cannabis patient Lift has been in contact with since May, Daryl, who asked that we only use his first name, says he applied when the program was first announced, but initially had his paperwork limited to three months by his doctor. His renewal, he says, took 6 months to process.


Related: Patients waiting months for approval of to grow their own cannabis


“That renewal paperwork was submitted via Expresspost on November 21, 2016 and signed by HC on December 5, 2016,” Daryl wrote to Lift earlier this year. “I got my renewal on April 10, 2017. I phoned Health Canada every 2 weeks, waiting approx 15-45 mins each time to speak with someone before being told my application was being worked on.”

Daryl says he continued to grow even while waiting for his renewal, and that his actions, if it came to it, would be protected by the court.

 

“The wait process is terrible, I have to apply again at the end of the month in hopes I get my renewal before it expires again in November. I feel terrible about this program and I know the courts would protect me as a medical patient if I were to ever have police come knocking.”

 

Lift contacted Daryl again recently to check in with his process, and he says he’s already worked with his doctor to submit a renewal to Health Canada in expectation of its expiration this November.

 

“On May 29, 2017, I saw my doctor for a regular three month check up, at which time I spoke to him regarding concerns (with) the delay in applying with Health Canada. I brought in a renewal application and said I would like to submit it now, this is just about seven months before my current ACMPR personal production grow needs to be renewed.

 

“My doctor absolutely agreed and we sent it in, it was shown as delivered to Health Canada on June 6, 2017. I tried on 3 occasions to contact Health Canada to inquire on the status of my application, however after more than 1 hour waits on hold each time, I hung up in frustration.”

 

Another medical cannabis user we spoke with in May and again last week, Craig, who also asked we only use his first name, said he just recently received his approved paperwork in June. [Editor’s note: It’s common for medical cannabis users to ask for some level of anonymity because of the stigma many still associate with cannabis use and medical conditions. Lift takes care to honour these requests.]


Related: Home Grows in Canada: The Devil's in the Details


Craig says he first applied in November, but had his paperwork returned as incorrect because his doctor had checked the wrong box, and had to reapply in January. It has since been approved, but, like Daryl, Craig is now concerned about getting his authorization to grow his own marijuana renewed in time for him to continue to grow legally. Craig says it took over five months to receive that approval.

 

“I initially sent my paperwork back in November of 2016,” Craig wrote to Lift in May. “It got returned to me in January as my medical document had some box checked from my doctor's office that should not have been checked. I mailed it back to them without this box that caused issue in the middle of January 2017.”

 

“I received authorization around the beginning of June,” Craig wrote to Lift last week. “It was 22 weeks from the date they advised me they had received the complete (error-free) application to the date it was in my hands.”

 

Craig says he is growing outdoors and expects to harvest before his license expires, but wants to make sure he can keep growing inside through the winter.

 

“It took 22 weeks to get my papers and all is well in that regard. I am concerned that I may need to apply for my renewal sooner than later as it expires in November.”

While frustrated with the wait time, Craig says he’s still happy with the program and happy to hear Health Canada is hiring more employees.

 

“I feel this personal cultivation program is only going to get bigger and they will need to keep adding staff. It should be a process that takes a few weeks at most if all the information has been received and the application is error free, not months.”


Related: Will Doctors be prescribing home grown cannabis?


While some physicians have expressed reluctance to be the gatekeepers of who can grow their own cannabis for medical purposes, other companies have sprouted up that are catering to this demand, some advertising graduated rates depending on how many plants are to be approved.

 

A representative for Health Canada told Lift wait times can often be due to the ‘quality’ of applications and that wait times may be due to the need for employees to verify aspects of the paperwork.

 

“The time to review an application and issue a registration certificate is highly dependent upon the number of applications received, and the quality or the completeness of the applications. It also depends on the response time of applicants or healthcare practitioners, who may be contacted by our client service representatives to verify information or to provide additional clarification.”

 


lift

 

 

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10,000 Canadians authorized to grow their own medical cannabis

Health Canada says that as of August 31 there were 10,547 Canadians approved to cultivate cannabis for personal use, an increase of over 50% in two months

September 24, 2017

 
 
Screen-Shot-2017-09-24-at-6.27.44-PM-113

Feature image via /u/Craigson

 

Participation in Health Canada’s personal cannabis cultivation program continues to grow, even as many still wait several months for approval.

 

In response to a request for an update from Lift, the regulator says that as of August 31 there were 10,547 Canadians registered either to grow their own cannabis or as designated growers for others, up from from 6,880 at the end of June 31, 2017. Processing time for these registrations also continues to increase, with the regulator saying it’s anywhere from 8-16 weeks to process an application, while some patients are saying it’s taken up to six months to process their application.

 

The uptick in application approvals, an increase of over 50% in two months, was aided by the hiring of over 30 new employees earlier this year to help process applications. Health Canada says they have processed more than 15,000 applications since the program began in August, 2016.

 

The program, introduced in August of last year, re-introduced legislation that allows patients who register with Health Canada to grow a limited number of plants for their own purpose, or to designate an authorized grower to do so for them. Health Canada had formerly allowed home production under a previous medical marijuana regime, the Medical Marihuana Access Regulations (MMAR), but halted new applications with the introduction of the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR) in 2014. 

 

Interest in the program quickly created a backlog, with over 2,500 people seeking to register in the first six months or so, and over 4,000 by May, forcing Health Canada to hire 17 new employees to help manage the process. The regulator says they added 21 employees in April and May of this year and an additional 11 in June.

 

Medical cannabis patients Lift spoke to earlier this year reported waiting several months, some waiting up to six months for an application that only lasts a year from when it was originally sent in, or less, depending on the doctor's authorization policy. 

 

Health Canada says the time to review applications is “highly dependent upon the number of applications received and the quality or the completeness of the applications” and depends on variables like response time from signing doctors.

 

The registration for personal cannabis cultivation is about two pages long, mostly requiring personal information, location of the grow and a signature from a doctor.


While some physicians have expressed reluctance to be the gatekeepers of who can grow their own cannabis for medical purposes, other companies have sprouted up that are catering to this demand, some advertising graduated rates depending on how many plants are to be approved.

“The time to review an application and issue a registration certificate is highly dependent upon the number of applications received, and the quality or the completeness of the applications. It also depends on the response time of applicants or healthcare practitioners, who may be contacted by our client service representatives to verify information or to provide additional clarification.” -Health Canada

 


 

https://news.lift.co/10000-canadians-authorized-to-grow-their-own-medical-cannabis

 

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just about to start month 8 of waiting for mine It will be expired before I even get it I think. I may as well re apply now :brickwall:

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