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Sassyfemme

Preparing for 2014 Outdoor, what to use.

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Sassyfemme    313

Ok, so here goes; I will be doing my second outdoor grow come next june somewhere in Quebec. Last year, I used some promix BX, a little bone meal, shellfish compost as well as Canna nutrients.

I know the Canna nutrients aren't really considered organic but I did get pretty good results. This time around, if I can, I'd really like to go more organic.

 

I still think I should use Promix as well as the shellfish compost, and bonemeal, all of which I'd use to prepare and let cook in the outdoor garden space before actually planting ( would do this during month of May ). 

I do wish to keep it as simple as possible while ensuring that that future crop be all organic. All help would be very much appreciated.

 

Here's a pic from last summer's crop.

 


 

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Doobie Brother    1,034

High Sass

 

I turned away from the dark side and went organic a little while back; the results have been great, thanks to the help I received from guys like OG.  Maybe I can return a little of the kindness and patience they showed me. 

 

My mix includes the following:

 

Promix

Perlite

EWC  (earth worm castings)

Blood or Bone meal (depending on whether in veg or flowering)

Sheep compost

Sea compost 

 

then I make up teas from either worm castings or compost, and add a liquid fish/kelp mix which is made locally.  That's it.

 

I try to keep it simple :)

 

Hope this helps

 

 

 

 

 

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Sassyfemme    313

So not surprised to see your post Doobie, and it makes me so glad. I'll pick up the necessary composts over the next couple of months. What do you mean about the blood or bone meal depending if in veg or flowering, is it best to use blood meal for veg only and later on use the bone meal for the flower stage ?

 

I can get all of this at my local hydro store, I was also thinking of adding actual worms as I'm told they tend to add their own compost ( waste ) and aerate the earth.

This lady is very happy indeed, thank you, you made my day.  :D

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Grow_Wizzard    578

Sassy, you might want to help things along by getting some micro fungi to help your roots. And look into a aerated compost tea they work great but getting the taste right takes practice LOL......

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You definitely want to include some micro bacteria in your mix

I add composted alfalfa and alfalfa tea to my growing routine.

If you are growing outdoors in the woods you must be careful what you put under your plants or they will be dug up by animals. Blood meal in the bush has never worked out good for me. The coyotes here will dig them up

Looking for a snack. When growing in the bush i use processed palletized organic nutrients only.

The other thing you must not do is plant them too early . If you put them out before the rest of the Bush has greened up all the critters well attack your plants and eat them. If you are growing outdoors can be challenging at times. Getting the right strain that will mature in your area can be problematic. It took me a long time and a great deal of effort to obtain and breed the right strains for where I live north of 55.

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Sassyfemme    313

You definitely want to include some micro bacteria in your mix

I add composted alfalfa and alfalfa tea to my growing routine.

If you are growing outdoors in the woods you must be careful what you put under your plants or they will be dug up by animals. Blood meal in the bush has never worked out good for me. The coyotes here will dig them up

Looking for a snack. When growing in the bush i use processed palletized organic nutrients only.

The other thing you must not do is plant them too early . If you put them out before the rest of the Bush has greened up all the critters well attack your plants and eat them. If you are growing outdoors can be challenging at times. Getting the right strain that will mature in your area can be problematic. It took me a long time and a great deal of effort to obtain and breed the right strains for where I live north of 55.

 

 

Hi Blueberrychronic,

 

I live up around the 47th, up in the Laurentians, in  Quebec.  I grow in my backward garden, which is fenced in with chicken wire all around the bottom to help prevent small critters from gaining access. I did an outdoor grow last summer but started only near end of june, and by mid-september, had some problems with botrytis but was still able to harvest at end of that month with little loss.

 

I grew mostly Pink Freezelands and one Durban Poison crossed with U.K. Cheese. Both are pretty hardy and early finishers. This time around I will be planting Big Freeze, Big Kiwi, the Durban Poison + UK Cheese and maybe some OG Kush. They are all early finishing types and pretty good producers to boot.

Indoors, I run Jean-Guy and other more exotic strains such as Romulan, White Widow, Sensi Star, Lemon Haze.

Protecting from animals is important and my big problem is fighting against certain bugs and specially mold like botrytis.

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Sassyfemme    313

Sassy, you might want to help things along by getting some micro fungi to help your roots. And look into a aerated compost tea they work great but getting the taste right takes practice LOL......

 

Hi Grow_Wizzard,

I shall look into what that is, is it similar to Rhyzotonic or even B1 that I use for my soiless indoor grow ? I'll google it for sure. Thank you very much for these bits of important suggestions.  :)

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Doobie Brother    1,034

So not surprised to see your post Doobie, and it makes me so glad. I'll pick up the necessary composts over the next couple of months. What do you mean about the blood or bone meal depending if in veg or flowering, is it best to use blood meal for veg only and later on use the bone meal for the flower stage ?

 

I can get all of this at my local hydro store, I was also thinking of adding actual worms as I'm told they tend to add their own compost ( waste ) and aerate the earth.

This lady is very happy indeed, thank you, you made my day.   :D

 

Blood meal is high in Nitrogen (12-0-0) , Bone contains a lot of Phosphorus (4-12-0).  In veg you want high N, then increase the P during flower development.  

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Sassyfemme    313

Blood meal is high in Nitrogen (12-0-0) , Bone contains a lot of Phosphorus (4-12-0).  In veg you want high N, then increase the P during flower development.  

 

Oh, I get it, thank you. :D

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Grow_Wizzard    578

Sassy, I don't use any micro fungi or bacteria, but a lot of growers I know use a product called Microhaze or something similar to promote the microheard development and promote root growth. I use an aerated compost tea and don't have issues with root development but it is definitely something to research and was recommended to me to help kick start root production once you transplant into their final growing location. It was the only thing I could think of that the others haven't already mentioned. Keep doin your thing.... Peace.

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Sassyfemme    313

Sassy, I don't use any micro fungi or bacteria, but a lot of growers I know use a product called Microhaze or something similar to promote the microheard development and promote root growth. I use an aerated compost tea and don't have issues with root development but it is definitely something to research and was recommended to me to help kick start root production once you transplant into their final growing location. It was the only thing I could think of that the others haven't already mentioned. Keep doin your thing.... Peace.

Just finishing up with the stock of Canna Nutrients I already have, and will be switching over to organics. I'm seeing how this is a whole way of growing and that means I have to learn about teas, compost and other aspects like maybe adding more worms to the outdoor crop this coming summer.

Got me a 30feet x 30feet outdoor garden in which to experiment with strains.

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Sassyfemme    313

Got busy today and went out to buy some organic nutrients, etc,. Came back with blood meal, worm castings, shrimp compost and Promix BX with mycorrhizae.

 

I'm wondering if I will need potting soil or if the Promix amended with the shrimp compost and the worm castings will be enough the veging cycle ? I will be making an earth worm tea mixed with humus,etc,. 

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Sassyfemme    313

Organic growing is already a lot more enjoyable than what I was doing before, I'm in LOVE with organic gardening.

For now, I'm concentrating on ensuring a healthy veg cycle for my plants, making them big and strong for next summer's outdoor garden, which will be a sort of partial greenhouse set up ( 32ft. X 64ft. ) and will have a good variety of strains as well as the usual suspects ( tomatoes and some other veggies and sunflowers ).

Strains I'm experimenting with are; Romulan, Cali Orange, Headband 818, O.G. Kush, Big Kiwi, Big Freeze, Berkeley Dream, Canadian Crude, Durban Poison X U.K. Cheese, U.K. Cheese and will be starting my Jean-Guy's and White Widow in there as well but will likely finish them indoors once Fall weather gets too chilly for them. Some of these strains are from clones and others are from seed. Some were gifted to me by very kind people here and elsewhere and to them, I say thank you so very very much.

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Grow_Wizzard    578

Sassy,

 

Organic can be quite addicting.. LOL, Once you go organic you won't go back to chemical, at least not for personal use. This is how it was explained to me somewhere that I read it. Your plants don't actually use the nutrients that you put into the soil, the roots of the plants produce specific sugars, or starches which feed the bugs that eat the sugars or starches. The bugs eliminate what they have eaten and that is what the roots of the plants can absorb. If you don't have the right bugs in the soil your plants can't eat. An aerobic aerated compost tea provides all of the bugs required for your root system. Feed the soil not the plants. If you can get worms a few extras in your soil certainly won't hurt anything. I usually add compost from my compost pile which is healthy and full of bugs to my soil mix...  Peace...

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Doobie Brother    1,034

 

 I usually add compost from my compost pile which is healthy and full of bugs to my soil mix

 

When I first read this, I thought you (Gwiz) were using this stuff, bugs and all, to pot your plants! Clearly this is not the case, correct ?  Adding live bugs/eggs is pretty much playing with fire: on one hand they may help aerate and fertilize the soil, but on the other, many insects are detrimental to plants, and are to be avoided at all costs.

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Sassyfemme    313

Sassy,

 

Organic can be quite addicting.. LOL, Once you go organic you won't go back to chemical, at least not for personal use. This is how it was explained to me somewhere that I read it. Your plants don't actually use the nutrients that you put into the soil, the roots of the plants produce specific sugars, or starches which feed the bugs that eat the sugars or starches. The bugs eliminate what they have eaten and that is what the roots of the plants can absorb. If you don't have the right bugs in the soil your plants can't eat. An aerobic aerated compost tea provides all of the bugs required for your root system. Feed the soil not the plants. If you can get worms a few extras in your soil certainly won't hurt anything. I usually add compost from my compost pile which is healthy and full of bugs to my soil mix...  Peace...

 

Hi Grow_Wizzard, yeah, I am in love with growing organically. Being that my plants will be going outdoors, they will certainly be exposed to a great variety of insects, but I am already planning on buying worms to add into the hole as I plant each one. This all won't happen before beginning of June as I'm up in the 46º L zone and nights will still be cool even then. 

I do have a compost pile that we inherited from the last owners, but not knowing it's composition, I hesitate in using it at all, last year I noticed it was full of crickets.

A nice canna farmer gave me seeds he calls Berkeley Dream, and it's one of the strains I'll be cultivating, one of them is already a good 30 inches in height, so I can imagine that it will be pretty big by end of next september, early october. Same goes for the Bih Freeze and Big Kiwi that were given to me.  :D

 

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Sassyfemme    313

When I first read this, I thought you (Gwiz) were using this stuff, bugs and all, to pot your plants! Clearly this is not the case, correct ?  Adding live bugs/eggs is pretty much playing with fire: on one hand they may help aerate and fertilize the soil, but on the other, many insects are detrimental to plants, and are to be avoided at all costs.

 

Hi Doobie  :)  Last year, when growing in my garden, I didn't have any problems with insects that were bad for my crop, but the botrytis was hell. From mid-august till end september, I was out in the garden every day combating the mold with a 50% solution of alcohol. I succeeded in slowing it down enough to have a decent harvest. This coming summer, I am having my garden doubled in size and adding a membrane over it with the help of well positioned framing. This should extend the season a couple of weeks longer. :)

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Sassyfemme    313

So, here's a look at my veg room and what I'm getting ready for the upcoming summer garden. Tallest plants are presently 30 inches, shortest at about 18 inches. The last images was taken from my grow tent and shows some clones.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Grow_Wizzard    578

Sassy, I wouldn't be worried about using the compost as an additive to your soil especially if it's sat for a year. should be full of good micro organisms but it would be a bit high in nitrogen to put your plants straight into it. Looks like you will be ready for some nice plants come October...

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Sassyfemme    313

Sassy, I wouldn't be worried about using the compost as an additive to your soil especially if it's sat for a year. should be full of good micro organisms but it would be a bit high in nitrogen to put your plants straight into it. Looks like you will be ready for some nice plants come October...

 

I don't plan on using the compost pile because it seemed full of crickets or some sort of insect and I don't want to bring this into the garden and potentially harm my plants.

What I will be doing is making semi-raised beds for each plant and fill the holes with a mix of store bought compost ( shrimp ), worm castings, blood meal, bone meal, vermiculite, perlite, coco and maybe Promix or just some really good top soil to round it all out. Other than that, I'm hoping to have the plants presently in veg state, grow to about three feet each before putting out into the garden the first week of June. Should help them attain pretty a respectable size and with it being all organic, it will make for some great medicine ( I wonder how big I can get the Headband 818 and the O.G. Kush before harvest time ... though it will be quality first ).  :)

I think that I may eventually start a new compost pile that I have control over and know what is in it.

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Grow_Wizzard    578

Sassy, Try laying one down like I explain in my 2010 outdoor grow. in the outdoor section. You will double your yield. I have 4 compost piles going, making your own soil is fun and very worth wile.

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Sassyfemme    313

Sassy, Try laying one down like I explain in my 2010 outdoor grow. in the outdoor section. You will double your yield. I have 4 compost piles going, making your own soil is fun and very worth wile.

 

Hi Grow_Wizzard, just got through a 3 day rush to expand my indoor veg room because it was just too small to accommodate the plants. Also began replanting a few of them but got too tired and stopped for today. Yes, I was thinking of doing exactly that ( laying them down some ) but will it work now that I have super cropped them ? Should I start laying them down while they are in veg ?

Here's a few pics.

 

A section of the veg room.

 

Berkeley Dream, Headband 818 and a California Orange.

 

Headband 818

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Grow_Wizzard    578

Sassy, I've had the best results growing them to about 3' tall in veg and laying them down when the light is 14+ hours. They shouldn't go into flower and as the light increases they continue to veg for 1-2 months before they start to flower. I've had spindley long plants about 5+ feet tall that I've laid down and they took off and provided good yields. The ones in your pictures let go another 1-2 feet tall and lay them down at about that size. You'll probably have to take clones from those and veg the clones to lay them down. If you have any questions don't hesitate to give me a shout. and check out the 2010 outdoor it has a good overview of how I do them.

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Sassyfemme    313

Sassy, I've had the best results growing them to about 3' tall in veg and laying them down when the light is 14+ hours. They shouldn't go into flower and as the light increases they continue to veg for 1-2 months before they start to flower. I've had spindley long plants about 5+ feet tall that I've laid down and they took off and provided good yields. The ones in your pictures let go another 1-2 feet tall and lay them down at about that size. You'll probably have to take clones from those and veg the clones to lay them down. If you have any questions don't hesitate to give me a shout. and check out the 2010 outdoor it has a good overview of how I do them.

 

Thank you G_W, i did check out your 2010 outdoor thread, but only got to page 12 so didn't really read what you are referring to, I'll go back again soon. :)

I will follow your advice on this, so far the tallest of my plants is 30 inches, but I super cropped it down to 25 +-. Most of the plants are in the 20 inch zone. I actually tried laying some of last years outdoor crop down but wasn't as well prepared as I am now and I ended up releasing them from their binds ... I still got a pretty decent crop. This time around, I not only want to have beautiful organically grown plants, I also hope for a monster crop. :)

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Sassyfemme    313

Ok, so I think I have a good idea of how to lay down the plants when I transplant them to the outdoor garden in June. The space I will have available ( mind you, I am reserving some space for vegetables and flowers ) is about 32 feet x 64 feet and I am having a friend of mine install a greenhouse membrane over the garden space.

I'm thinking that since it gets very hot and humid in July, I might want the membrane to be retractable, so trying to figure that one out. The top will be near 10 feet in height with sides at about 5-6 feet. That makes for a pretty sizeable space. Will be planting 18 plants, layed down in order to not attract too much attention and also because, well, I'd really like to try and grow some monsters.

 

Being up at the 46º L somewhere in Quebec, Canada, summers are on the short side and choice or early finishing strains is an important consideration, and so is trying to stretch that period a bit longer, thus the greenhousing. 
 

*** For some reason, our house has been slightly infested with ladybugs this winter and I've been capturing them and placing them with in the veg room with the plants. Cheap labour. ;)

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