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Medical Marijuana Update

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

December 03, 2014

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The Kettle Falls Five case gets postponed, ASA starts a petition to protect California patients who need organ transplants, Minnesota begins implementing its new medical marijuana law, and more. Let's get to it:

National

On Tuesday, the head of the Epilepsy Foundation said he wants CBC cannabis oil available nationwide. Warren Lammert, chairman of the board of the Epilepsy Foundation, and father of an epileptic child, has said he wants CBD cannabis oil used to treat seizures made available nationwide. The Epilepsy Foundation has determined that "an end to seizures should not be determined by one's zip code," and that more research is essential.

California

On Monday, ASA announced a petition drive seeking support for a California Medical Marijuana Organ Transplant Act. The medical marijuana defense and advocacy group Americans for Safe Accessis leading a petition drive to garner support for state legislation to patients who are being denied access to organ transplants because of their medical marijuana use. The proposed legislation is the Medical Marijuana Organ Transplant. It would bar the denial of organ transplants because of medical marijuana use. Click on the title link for more information and to sign the petition.

On Tuesday, Los Angeles announced it had shut down more than 400 dispensaries.The office of City Attorney Mike Feuer says it has shut down 402 dispensaries since Feuer took office in the summer of 2013. The office has also filed more than 200 criminal cases related to dispensaries, with 743 defendants. It is unclear what the actual impact is, however; new dispensaries seem to pop up at the rate of one a day.

Also on Tuesday, the LA city attorney sued to block a medical marijuana delivery app. The LA city attorney's office filed a lawsuit to close down a mobile phone app that sets up home deliveries of medical marijuana. The lawsuit alleges that Nestdrop is a "flagrant attempt" to get around restrictions imposed by voters last year. The city argues that its medical marijuana ordinance only allows patients or caregivers to pick up the medicines themselves and does not allow delivery services. Nestdrop isn't the only the only app offering deliveries in Southern California, but it's the first to be targeted by authorities.

Colorado

Last Thursday, an Arizona professor fired for medical marijuana research got new funding to continue her work. Researcher Dr. Sue Sisley, who was fired from her job at the University of Arizona over her medical marijuana research, has been awarded a $2 million grant from the state of Colorado to continue her research into the effects of medical marijuana on veterans with PTSD.

Massachusetts

On Tuesday, a Massachusetts activist went public with his boundary-pushing Allston CBD shop. Veteran Bay State marijuana reform activist Bill Downing has opened a shop called CBD Please in Allston. He claims that his operation is legal because the products he offers are made from high-CBD, low-THC cannabis oils. And he's not too concerned about any reaction from authorities. "The state can do anything they want. They can throw me in jail. They can do whatever they want," said Downing. "But I know I'm doing the right thing and I'm doing it for the right reasons. I'm doing it for the patients here in the state and I really don't care about the bureaucracies trying to stop me because they're immoral. And because the public does not support them." When asked if what he was doing was legal, Downing replied: "I don't know, and I don't care."

Minnesota

On Monday, the state named two medical marijuana growers. The state Department of Health today named two groups that it has selected to grow marijuana under the state's new law. LeafLine Labs and Minnesota Medical Solutions ("MinnMed") will be allowed to grow, process, and distribute medical marijuana products. Medical marijuana is supposed to be available for patients by next July.

Oregon

Late last month, the state decided to appeal a lower court ruling that cities can ban dispensaries. The state earlier this month filed an appeal of a circuit court ruling that the city of Cave Junction can deny a business license to a medical marijuana dispensary. Josephine County Circuit Court Judge Pat Wolke ruled that the state's dispensary law, enacted last year, did not block the ban, but didn't rule on state constitutional issues involved. The city has also appealed the ruling.

Washington

On Monday, trial in the Kettle Falls Five federal medical marijuana case was postponed. A new judge assigned to hear the widely watched federal medical marijuana case of the Kettle Falls Five has continued the federal trial scheduled to begin Monday in Spokane, Washington. Senior Judge Fred Van Sickle has been replaced by Judge Thomas O. Rice, who set a new trial date of February 23. This comes as the US Senate plans to consider a measure later this week that would prohibit Department of Justice funds from being spent on medical marijuana enforcement in states where it's legal. Advocates say that federal prosecutions like the Kettle Falls Five, as well as pending asset forfeiture cases in California, would be impacted by the passage of such a measure. The change in trial date also came soon after CNN ran the latest national media piece on the Kettle Falls Five, discussing the contradictions between Washington's adult-use and medical marijuana laws and the prosecution of state compliant patients like the Kettle Falls Five.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

December 10, 2014

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Big news from DC on Tuesday as congressional budget negotiators included language barring the use of federal funds to go after medical marijuana where it is legal, and a whole lot of news from California, too. Let's get to it:

National

On Tuesday, a congressional budget deal blocked federal interference in medical marijuana states. In a deal hammered out Tuesday evening, the leaders of the House and Senate appropriations committees agreed on a budget bill that includes a measure curbing Justice Department enforcement efforts in states where medical marijuana is legal. The measure, in the form of an amendment offered by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), passed the House back in May. The relevant section of the bill, Section 538, lists all the states that have some form of legalized medical marijuana and says, "None of the funds made available in this Act to the Department of Justice may be used… to prevent such States from implementing their own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana"

California

Last Tuesday, El Dorado County supervisors voted not to repeal the county's cultivation ordinance. Instead, supervisors decided to appoint a task force consisting of county counsel, the sheriff, DA and activists to come up with a solution that will protect patients' rights.

Also last Tuesday, Kern County supervisors approved civil lawsuits against collectives and cooperatives. The supervisors are going after 19 co-ops or collectives located in unincorporated areas of the county. The county previously sued other collectives and most of those have closed up shop.

Last Thursday, legislators filed statewide medical marijuana regulation bills. Legislators will try again next year to bring statewide regulation to the state's medical marijuana industry. Assemblymember Reggie Jones-Sawyer (D-Los Angeles) has filed Assembly Bill 26, which largely revives Tom Ammiano's failed AB 1894 from this year, while Rep. Rob Bonta (D-Oakland) has filed Assembly Bill 34, which is a one-sentence placeholder bill saying it is intended to regulate medical marijuana.

Last Saturday, California doctors rejected denying organ transplants to medical marijuana patients. The California Medical Association (CMA) voted unanimously this past weekend to urge transplant clinics in the state against removing patients from organ transplant lists based on their medical marijuana status or use. The CMA House of Delegates was in San Diego for its annual meeting, and voted Saturday on Resolution 116-14 in support of patients' ability to remain on transplant lists despite their medical marijuana use.

On Monday, the Siskiyou County planning division released its draft cultivation ordinance. The ordinance would limit outdoor grows to four plants on properties an acre or smaller, six plants on properties up to 2.5 acres, eight plants on up to five acres, and 10 plants on properties greater than five acres. Comments can be submitted via email at [email protected]

On Tuesday, Butte County supervisors approved spending $446,500 to enforce the county's cultivation ordinance. The ordinance limits the size of medical marijuana gardens to 50 square feet on property larger than a half-acre, 100 square feet on properties larger than five acres, and 150 square feet on properties larger than 10 acres. The ordinance also allows anonymous denunciations of alleged violations.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

December 17, 2014

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Big news out of Washington and, for a change, most of our medical marijuana news is out of the Midwest this week. Let's get to it:

National

Last Saturday, the Senate passed the omnibus spending bill with an amendment blocking federal medical marijuana enforcement. The amendment that will effectively end for now Justice Department interference in states where medical marijuana is legal by barring the department from using its funds to go after patients and providers there.

Indiana

On Wednesday, a lawmaker said she would introduce a medical marijuana bill. Sen. Karen Tallian (D-Portage) said she plans to introduce a medical marijuana bill in the upcoming legislative session. She cited Congress's vote to bar the use of Justice Department funds to go after medical marijuana in states where it is legal. In previous sessions, Tallian has introduced pot decriminalization bills, but those have gone nowhere.

Iowa

On Tuesday, a group of Iowans orgnized to push for a more effective medical marijuana law. The legislature this year passed a bill allowing for the use of low-THC cannabis oil to treat people with epilepsy, but that's not good enough for a new group, Iowans 4 Medical Cannabis. The group today announced it had formed to push legislators to make it possible to produce and dispense medical marijuana.

Oklahoma

Last Friday, a cannabis oil medical marijuana bill was filed. Rep. John Echols (R-Oklahoma City) has said he planned to file a low-THC cannabis oil bill. The bill would only allow for use my children suffering from epilepsy. The news comes as the director of the state's drug agency says he now backs a study that would make the medicine available to sick children.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

December 23, 2014

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Another medical organization calls for rescheduling, a California court rules that concentrates are medicine, Colorado starts handing out medical marijuana research money, and more. Let's get to it:

National

Last Wednesday, the American Academy of Neurology called for rescheduling marijuana. In a just-released position statement on the use of medical marijuana for neurological disorders, the academy said it could not yet recommend medical marijuana for those disorders "because further research is needed to determine the benefits and safety of such products." To that end, the academy "requests the reclassification of marijuana-based products from their current Schedule I status so as to improve access for study of marijuana or cannabinoids under IRB-approved research protocols." Click on the link to read the entire position statement.

California

Last Thursday, a state appeals court ruled that cannabis concentrates qualify as medical marijuana. The 3rd District Court of Appeal ruled that "concentrated cannabis" qualifies as marijuana for purposes of medical use. The ruling came in People v. Mulcrevy, in which medical marijuana patients and probationer Sean Patrick Mulcrevy was accused of violating his probation because he was caught in possession of cannabis oil. Concentrated cannabis "is covered by the Compassionate Use Act, and there is insufficient evidence Mulcrevy violated his probation in light of that conclusion," the appeals court held unanimously.

On Tuesday, a Los Angeles judge ordered Nestdrop to stop making medical marijuana deliveries. Nestdrop, a smart phone app, had been the subject of a complaint by LA City Attorney Mike Feuer, who said it violates a law restricting deliveries in the city. Nestdrop had already quit making deliveries, but now there is a preliminary injunction to prevent it from restarting.

Colorado

Last Wednesday, the Board of Health awarded more than $8 million for medical marijuana research. The awards will allow researchers to investigate marijuana's medical potential, not its downsides, as is required for most federally-approved research on marijuana. Three of the eight studies will still require federal approval and marijuana from the US government. In the other five "observational" studies, subjects will be providing their own marijuana. Researchers will study marijuana's impact on PTSD, irritable bowel syndrome, pain relief for children with brain tumors, pediatric epileptic seizures, and compare it with oxycodone for pain relief.

New Hampshire

Last Friday, the Department of Health and Human Services announced it was taking dispensary applications. It released its request for applications for people who want a shot at operating one of the four "alternative treatment centers" contemplated under the state's medical marijuana laws. The state is divided into four geographic areas; each will be allowed one dispensary.

New York

Last Friday, the Department of Health released draft medical marijuana regulations. The Department of Health released the draft regs, but advocates say they are too tight. "New York will be one of the more restrictive programs in the country, which could inhibit patients from getting the relief they need," the Drug Policy Alliance complained. Click on the title link for details on the draft regs.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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A Year of Legal Pot

Colorado will lead research into pot's real medical value

By Electa Draper

The Denver Post

Posted: 12/26/2014

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Medical marijuana patient Teri Robnett, right, uses a vape pen to inhale cannabinoids and manage her chronic fibromyalgia. Her husband, Greg Duran, grinds marijuana to use in a larger vaporizer for Teri, who medicates throughout the day. (Photos by Andy Cross, The Denver Post)

After Coloradans decreed in 2000 that the cannabis plant had medical value, scientific evidence has had to play catch-up with the anecdotal cases.

The list of claims of healing powers of marijuana is long, while the list of full-scale U.S. studies on medicinal benefits is short, largely because pot use is still against federal law and doesn't get many federal research dollars.

Colorado voters approved themedical use of pot in 2000 and recreational use in 2012.

Now Colorado is leading the nation in state spending on studies of medical marijuana.

The state's Medical Marijuana Scientific Advisory Council considered Dec. 17 how to spend $9 million set aside by the state legislature for two- to three-year studies on marijuana treatment for chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, Parkinson's disease tremors, pediatric epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease and palliative care for pediatric brain tumors.

"You can't ignore the anecdotal evidence. It's compelling," said Dr. Larry Wolk, director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. "I wouldn't want to deprive families' hope or treatment. But medical effectiveness still needs to be verified. With these studies, we could have some answers within the next year."

There were 116,287 people holding medical marijuana cards in Colorado at the end of September — about 3,400 more than at the end of last year before recreational pot became legal — and 816 physicians with medical pot patients. About 66 percent are male, the average age is 42 and 427 patients are under age 18.

Most patients, 93 percent, are using medical marijuana to treat severe pain. Muscle spasms are the reason given by 15 percent of card holders. Some patients have listed both as a reason.

Conditions recognized for medical cannabis use in Colorado are cachexia (or wasting syndrome), cancer, chronic pain, chronic nervous system disorders, epilepsy and other seizure disorders, glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, multiple sclerosis and other muscle spasticity disorders and nausea.

"It's unlikely that marijuana is effective for the wide range of health problems approved under Colorado law," said the University of Colorado's Dr. Andrew Monte, who co-wrote a viewpoint piece on legalizing marijuana published Dec. 8 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Yet hope and desperation can be stronger than scientific evidence. Colorado has become a beacon for those seeking a marijuana cure for their illnesses and suffering.

Boulder County medical marijuana caregiver Jason Cranford said he and others are flooded with requests from around the country to treat cancer, seizure disorders and countless other conditions in children and adults.

Teri Robnett, with the Cannabis Patients Alliance, was the only non-scientist, non-medical person named to the Medical Marijuana Scientific Advisory Council.

Robnett has suffered 27 years with fibromyalgia, a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and fatigue and sleep, memory, mood and digestive issues. In 2009 she began experimenting with cannabis.

"It completely changed my life," Robnett said. It's the only thing that's alleviated her symptoms without serious side effects, she said.

She discerns a recent shift in the medical community's attitudes toward marijuana. Scientists are less interested in questioning whether it has value as medicine, she said, and more interested in determining just how effective it is and how patients should be dosed.

Studies going back 40 years showed marijuana can be used to treat and prevent glaucoma, an eye disease that increases pressure in the eyeball, damaging the optic nerve and causing loss of vision.

More recent research has found that chemicals in marijuana can lessen the incidence of epileptic and Dravet's syndrome seizures, alleviate the chronic pain of cancer, arthritis and nerve pain — and may be safer than opioids. It lessens the nausea of chemotherapy and is an appetite stimulant.

Marijuana likely has anti-inflammatory effects and appears to benefit some patients with inflammatory bowel disease, other studies show.

Claims that cannabis limits tumor growth, slows the progression of Alzheimer's disease or eases muscles spasms, alleviating symptoms of multiple sclerosis or the tremors of Parkinson's, among other conditions, are not substantiated by research, said Monte, who works in CU's emergency medicine department and with the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center.

Medical professionals point out that smoking or ingesting a plant is not "pharmacological" and that it's impossible to administer a consistent dose and predict a consistent result.

"Something given in a known and consistent dose, that's medicine," Wolk also said. "I'm uncomfortable with a plant as a medical model."

Medical marijuana generally means the whole unprocessed marijuana plant or crude extracts, which are not approved as medicine by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The National Institutes of Health has funded some investigations into therapeutic uses of plant constituents, THC, CBD and other active chemicals called cannabinoid.

Studies have led to the development of two FDA-approved medications, dronabinol (brand name Marinol), which contains THC, and nabilone (brand name Cesamet), which has a synthetic form of THC. They are used to treat the nausea caused by chemotherapy and the weight loss and muscle atrophy caused by AIDS.

A CBD-based drug called Epidolex has been created to treat certain forms of childhood epilepsy, and clinical trials are underway.

Electa Draper: 303-954-1276

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In December at her home, Robnett uses an Herbalizer to fill a bag with cannabinoid vapor to manage chronic fibromyalgia.

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

December 30, 2014

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There could be dispensaries in Las Vegas as early as next week, and soon in San Diego, Illinois posts rules for kids' medical marijuana use, Florida tries again on crafting medical marijuana regs, and more. Let's get to it:

California

Last Friday, San Diego officials announced they had closed more dispensaries. City Attorney Jan Goldsmith has shuttered five more unpermitted dispensaries ahead of the opening of the first permitted dispensaries early next year. Four are set to open then. More than 200 dispensaries have been shut down in the past four years under threat of legal action, but as many as 50 unpermitted dispensaries remain.

Florida

On Tuesday, Florida tried again on crafting medical marijuana regulations. The Department of Health held a hearing in Orlando in a bid to re-start the process of crafting regulations for the state's low-THC, high-CBD medical marijuana law. A program allowing for the use of the medicine was supposed to go into effect Thursday, but was bumped back after an administrative hearing judge sided with appellants who argued the first draft rules were too restrictive. It's not clear how long this new regulatory process will take.

Illinois

Last Thursday, the state posted rules for children's medical marijuana use. State officials have released new emergency rules for allowing children to receive medical marijuana under a new law that goes into effect January 1. Kids won't be able to smoke marijuana, but will have to use edibles or liquid concentrates, and parents must get two doctors' signatures in order for their kids to be able to use it. Patient activists are calling that requirement "an unnecessary burden."

Nevada

On Monday, Clark County commissioners rejected state changes to its list of 18 dispensary applicants. At least 10 dispensaries have been approved by both state and Clark County (Las Vegas) officials and could open as early as next week. But another eight are up in the air after disputes between the state and the county. The county had selected 18 applicants, but the state made eight changes to the list, and the county commission on Monday rejected the changes. That means there are now eight vacancies for dispensaries in the county. Even those who were among the eight contested dispensaries will have to reapply and start the process again.

South Carolina

On Monday, a state senator said he would be back with more medical marijuana bills next year. State Sen. Tom Davis (R-Beaufort), author of a successful high-CBD medical marijuana bill this year, says he will be back with three more bills next year. One would create laws for growing high-CBD, low-THC marijuana, another would clean up language in the state's hemp laws, and the third is a full-fledged medical marijuana bill.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

January 07, 2015

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All the medical marijuana news this week is from the West and Midwest. There's good news from Iowa, Montana, and South Dakota, but things are going slowly in Illinois. Let's get to it:

Illinois

Last Wednesday, the state missed its own deadline on issuing medical marijuana licenses. State officials admitted Wednesday afternoon that they had missed their self-imposed deadline to begin issuing dispensary and cultivation licenses before the end of 2014. But they didn't say why or when they would be ready. Here is the statement from the Department of Health: "We are strongly committed to bringing relief to thousands of people across the state and ensuring Illinois is the national model for implementing medical cannabis. We are working hard to make sure this is done right. We are conducting a comprehensive review of every cultivation center and dispensary applicant to ensure that only the most qualified are approved for this important program. We will announce the recipients when this important review is finished."

Iowa

On Monday, the Iowa Pharmacy Board voted to reschedule CBD, but not marijuana. The state Board of Pharmacy voted to move cannabidiol (CBD) from Schedule I to Schedule II, but not marijuana. The board was acting on a petition from long-time activist Carl Olsen, who sought to have the whole plant rescheduled. But the board wasn't ready to do that. Olsen says while it isn't what he was asking for, it is a step in the right direction.

Montana

Last Friday, a district court judge blocked some restrictions on medical marijuana. A state district court judge dealt a death blow to provisions of a restrictive state medical marijuana law passed by the Republican-dominated legislature seven years after Big Sky voters approved a more open initiative allowing for medicinal use and a wide open dispensary scene. District Judge James Reynolds in Helena permanently enjoined the implementation of certain key provisions in the law. Those provisions have never actually taken effect because Reynolds blocked them with a temporary injunction back in 2011. Click on the title link for more details.

South Dakota

On Monday, medical marijuana billboards began going up in Sioux Falls. Billboards pushing for medical marijuana and paid for by the Sioux Falls Free Thinkers are going up this week in South Dakota's largest city. The move comes as advocacy groups, including South Dakota Against Prohibition, work to get a medical marijuana bill through the legislature this session. South Dakota legislators have consistently rejected medical marijuana, and so have the state's voters. Past efforts to legalize medical marijuana at the ballot box failed in 2006 and 2010.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

January 14, 2015

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The battle over a CBD medical marijuana bill is heating up in Georgia, the Florida medical marijuana initiative returns, California localities continue to deal with dispensary issues, and more. Let's get to it:

California

Last Friday, Kern County sued to shut down five more dispensaries. That's makes a least a dozen lawsuits filed against dispensaries by the county. Those hit this time are Genuine Empathy, Greenery Lounge, Organic Caregivers Center, Medical Alternative Supply House Corporation, and Platinum Wellness.

On Tuesday, the San Diego city council moved forward on dispensary applications. The council rejected appeals of a staff finding that dispensary applications are exempt from provisions of the state's Environmental Protection Act. This will allow some 40 permit applications to move forward, although it's unlikely more than a few will be granted. The city does not yet have a legal dispensary, but it has shut down dozens of unpermitted ones.

Also on Tuesday, the Vallejo city council voted to ban dispensaries, then voted to regulate them instead. The council first voted 5-2 to ban all dispensaries, then voted 4-3 not to. It then approved a measure to begin the process of regulating dispensaries. The city has about 30 dispensaries now operating, but only 12 are complying with tax and licensing requirements. It's unclear how many would be allowed under the regulation scheme, but one council member said the proper number was two.

Connecticut

On Wednesday,the medical marijuana program's Board of Physicians recommended expanding the list of qualifying medical conditions. The board voted to include sickle cell disease, chronic back pain after surgery, and severe psoriasis as qualifying conditions for medical marijuana, but not Tourette's Syndrome. The recommendations now go to the Consumer Protection Commissioner, who would then decide whether to accept the recommendation, then draft a new regulation that would go to another public hearing before going to the General Assembly's regulation-review committee for a final decision. It could take months or even years.

Florida

On Monday.the Florida medical marijuana initiative returned. Proponents of last year's failed medical marijuana initiative have filed a rewritten ballot measure aimed at 2016. "The language and the essence of the amendment is essentially the same," said John Morgan, the Orlando attorney who chairs People United for Medical Marijuana, and the chief financer of the legalization drive. "What I would say is that we have tweaked or clarified positions that were constantly brought up by our opposition to help us talk more freely about the real issue, which is the legalization of medical marijuana."

Georgia

Last Friday,a poll found that Georgians back allowing CBD cannabis oil. Some 84% of Georgians support the legalization of low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oils to treat medical conditions, according to a new Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll. The poll also found that when it came to legalizing marijuana for recreational use, Georgians were split almost evenly, with 49% saying legalize it and 48% saying don't.

On Monday,the fight over a CBD medical marijuana bill continued. Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon) has said he will modify his CBD medical marijuana bill, House Bill 1, after Gov. Nathan Deal ® objected to a provision that would allow production of the group in the state. That has supporters of the bill unhappy. They say that because federal law prohibits transporting medical marijuana between states, their medicine will remain out of reach if it cannot be grown in-state.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org].

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

January 21, 2015

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California localities continue to deal with medical marijuana, bills are showing up in the states, the Kettle Falls Five want their prosecutions ended, and more. Let's get to it:

Federal

On Monday, a member of the Kettle Falls Five sought dismissal of his federal marijuana case. The widely watched case out of Washington state has been proceeding despite passage of the "CRomnibus" appropriations bill barring the use of federal funds to pursue medical marijuana patients and providers in states where it is legal. Now, Larry Harvey, 71, has filed a motion to dismiss the charges, with his attorney arguing that "federal prosecutions take away Washington's authority to determine for itself whether someone is in compliance with its laws or not."

California

On Monday, Berkeley began accepting applications for a fourth dispensary. The deadline for applications is March 20. Click on the link for more details.

On Tuesday, the San Diego city council tightened dispensary rules. The council approved requiring employee background checks and testing of products for mold and pesticides, but didn't move to regulate deliveries or create stricter rules for edibles or concentrates. The rules come as the city's first permitted dispensary is supposed to open in the spring. Numerous un-permitted ones exist, but the city has been trying to shut them down.

Also on Tuesday, the Rancho Cordova city council approved a ban on outdoor grows and indoor grows if children are present. The measure was approved 5-0 and will take effect in 30 days.

Also on Tuesday, the Redding city council decided not to try to prohibit outdoor grows. Council members said they wanted to wait for the state and the federal government to figure out their medical marijuana policies first.

Florida

On Monday, the state chose its medical marijuana rulemakers. The state Office of Compassionate Use has selected a 12-member panel to craft rules for growing and distributing low-THC, high-CBD medical marijuana under a state law passed last year. The panel will meet during the first week of February to set up a regulatory structure for five nurseries that will be selected to grow, process, and distribute the medicine.

Georgia

Last Friday, a CBD medical marijuana bill died. Rep. Allen Peake's House Bill 1, which would have allowed for the use of high-CBD cannabis oil to treat seizures in children, has died before even being introduced. The bill died after Gov. Nathan Deal ® announced his support for another CBD bill, which is yet to be written.

Hawaii

On Wednesday, the Health Department took over the medical marijuana program. A 2013 law transferring control of the state's medical marijuana program from the Department of Public Safety to the Department of Health is now in effect. Although the program officially became part of the Health Department on January 1, it took until now for the transfer to be complete. For more detail on other program changes, as well as times for public hearings on new regulations, click on the link.

Kansas

Last Friday, medical marijuana supporters rallied in Topeka. Several dozen medical marijuana supporters were joined by a pair of Democratic lawmakers at a statehouse rally to call for legalizing the medicinal use of the herb. The two legislators, Rep. Gail Finney (D-Wichita) and Sen. David Haley (D-Kansas City), filed medical marijuana bills prior to the start of this year's legislative session. Similar measures have been filed since 2009, but none of them have made it to the discussion stage in committee.

Minnesota

Last Thursday, a Minnesota Indian tribe okayed a study on medical marijuana. The tribal council for the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians has approved a study what economic benefits could accrue to the tribe by allowing the production of medical marijuana and hemp. Tribal leaders weren't interested in recreational marijuana, but saw job growth and economic development opportunities in producing medical marijuana or hemp. The federal government cleared the way for Indian reservations to participate in marijuana business last month, but so far, only one tribe, the Pinole Pomos in Northern California, has announced plans to move forward.

Rhode Island

On Saturday, the state's first vapor lounge opened. Rhode Island patients can now have a place where they can gather and enjoy their medicine together. The Elevated vapor lounge opened in Providence Saturday.

Virginia

As of Wednesday, there were at least three medical marijuana or CBD bills before the legislature. There are at two new bills aiming to make the use of high-CBD, low-THC medical marijuana legal in the Old Dominion. Filed by Sen. David Marsden (D-Fairfax), Senate Bill 1235 would legalize CBD cannabis oil and THC-A oil. Delegate David Albo (R-Fairfax) has filed House Bill 1445, which would also legalize CDB cannabis oil. A third bill, House Bill 1605, filed by Delegate Kenneth Plum (D-Reston) would legalize marijuana.

Washington

Last Monday, a state law banning medical marijuana advertising was ruled unconstitutional. Pierce County Superior Court Judge Elizabeth Martin has ruled unconstitutional a state law that prohibits the advertising of medical uses of marijuana. The law was both vague and overly broad, she ruled, concluding that it violated both the state and federal constitutions. The case is Havsy v. Department of Health.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

January 28, 2015

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Medical marijuana is seeing lots of action at state houses around the country, and the American Academy of Pediatrics has a new policy statement on medical marijuana.

National

On Monday, pediatricians called for rescheduling marijuana and said compassionate use for children is okay. In a new policy statement, the American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that the DEA reschedule marijuana to ease research on it. The influential medical society is also proposing that medical marijuana be made available on a compassionate basis for children with serious illnesses who have not benefited from other medicines. Click the policy statement link for more detail.

Florida

On Monday, a full-blown medical marijuana bill was filed. State Sen. Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg) has filed Senate Bill 258, which would regulate the cultivation, distribution, and use of medical marijuana in the state. The proposal larger mirrors that failed constitutional amendment that won 57% of the vote last year (it needed 60% to pass because it was a constitutional amendment). The state passed a medical marijuana bill last year, but it was limited to high-CBD cannabis oils. Brandes is chair of the Senate Transportation Committee and sits on the Criminal Justice Committee, too.

Georgia

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill was filed. Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon) filed House Bill 1, which would allow the use of CBD cannabis oil for qualifying patients. He had earlier considered a bill that would allow marijuana to be grown in-state, but he removed that language after objections from Gov. Nathan Deal ®. Peake said he hopes a deal can be struck that will allow for cannabis oil to be imported to the state.

Iowa

Last Friday, medical cannabis oil patient registration opened. The Department of Health has completed establishing a process to approve and generate medical cannabis oil registration cards. The legislature passed a bill last year allowing for such use. The relevant Health Department web page is here.

Kansas

Last Wednesday, Kansas parents got a Senate hearing on a medical marijuana bill. The Senate Public Health and Welfare Committee heard Wednesday from parents of chronically ill children were speaking in support of pending medical marijuana legislation, SB 9, introduced by Sen. David Haley (D-Kansas City). Click on the title link for hearing details.

Last Thursday, opponents got their chance. The Senate Public Health and Welfare Committee heard from opponents of pending medical marijuana legislation Thursday. Eric Voth, chairman of the Institute on Global Drug Policy, said marijuana is harmful and legalization measures would threaten public health, while a spokesman for the Kansas Association of Police Chiefs said medical marijuana has caused problems in states that have allowed it.

Illinois

On Monday, the new governor said he was no hurry to grant business licenses. Former Gov. Pat Quinn (D) left behind a list of companies poised to be granted medical marijuana business licenses, but incoming Gov. Bruce Rauner ® is in no hurry. Now he wants to conduct "a thorough legal review of the process" used to choose licensees. Medical marijuana patients will have to continue to wait.

Maine

Last Friday, a bill to allow medical marijuana in hospitals was introduced. State Sen. Eric Brakey (R-Auburn) has filed LD 35, which would allow registered patients to use medical marijuana in hospitals. It does so by adding hospitals to list of eligible primary caregivers, the list of places where patients can store and use medical marijuana, and barring hospitals from prohibiting the use of smokeless marijuana by patients.

Nebraska

Last Wednesday, a full-blown medical marijuana bill was filed. State Sen. Tommy Garrett (D-Bellevue) has filed LB 643, a full-blown medical marijuana bill that allows patients or caregivers to grow up to 12 plants and possess up to six ounces, envisions a dispensary system, and allows the plant to be used for a specified list of diseases and conditions.

Pennsylvania

On Tuesday, a medical marijuana was reintroduced. State Sens. Daylin Leach (D-Montgomery) and Mike Folmer (R-Dauphin) have reintroduced a medical marijuana that died late in the last session. The new bill, Senate Bill 3, is almost identical to last year's Senate Bill 1182. It has a bipartisan batch of cosponsors -- 11 Republicans and 14 Democrats.

Also on Tuesday, there was a change of tune from the governor's mansion. Last year, then Gov. Tom Corbett ® was a staunch foe of medical marijuana. But now, there's a new year, a new legislative session, and a new governor. This one, Democrat Tom Wolf, met with families of children suffering from diseases treatable by medical marijuana Tuesday and said he would support broad medical marijuana legislation.

South Carolina

Last Thursday, a medical marijuana bill was filed. State Rep. Todd Rutherford (D-Columbia) last week formally introduced a full-blown medical marijuana bill, H3140, that he had prefiled back in October. It would allow registered patients to use medical marijuana for "a debilitating medical condition," and patients or caregivers could possess up to six plants and two ounces of usable marijuana. It is now before the House Judiciary Committee.

Texas

Last Friday, identical CBD medical marijuana bills were filed. State Rep. Stephanie Klick (R-Ft. Worth) and Sen. Kevin Eltife (R-Tyler) today introduced identical bills that would allow children with epilepsy to be treated with low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oils. The House version is HB 892.

Wyoming

Last Thursday, a medical marijuana bill was killed in the House. The House Judiciary Committee killed a medical marijuana bill on a 5-4 vote. The bill was House Bill 78.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org].

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

February 05, 2015

MMJ%20leaf%20and%20stethoscope%20KY%20OD

Busy, busy. A federal medical marijuana bill is filed, and so are many more in the states. Also, the Surgeon General has something to say, Oregon bars patients from being caregivers, Maine says medical marijuana can make parents unfit, and more. Let's get to it:

Federal

On Monday, a federal appeals court questioned attempts to shut down an Oakland dispensary. A three-judge panel of the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco today challenged federal prosecutors over their attempt to shut down Oakland's Harborside dispensary. The judges wanted to know why the effort was continuing given recent policy pronouncements from the Justice Department that it would not go after dispensaries where they are legal.

On Tuesday, a bill to allow VA docs to to recommend medical marijuana was filed. US Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and 16 bipartisan cosponsors have introduced a bill that would allow Veterans Affairs (VA) physicians to discuss and recommend medical marijuana to their patients, a right enjoyed by physicians outside of the VA system. The Veterans Equal Access Act is not yet available on the congressional web site.

On Wednesday, the 4US Surgeon General said medical marijuana can help some patients. In an interview on "CBS This Morning," US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy said the medical effectiveness of marijuana had to be shown scientifically and much more information about it was coming. "We have some preliminary data showing that for certain medical conditions and symptoms, marijuana can be helpful," said Murthy. "I think we have to use that data to drive policymaking, and I'm very interested to see where that data takes us."

California

Last Thursday, San Diego's first permitted dispensary won final approval. The A Green Alternative dispensary won a final okay from the Planning Commission. It will become the first permitted dispensary to operate in the city since the state passed Prop 215 in 1996. Three other dispensaries are expected to be approved in March.

On Wednesday, a federal judge upheld most patient claims in a lawsuit against Lake County. Patients filed suit after plant seizures last year. The county argued that officers could enter a property without a warrant to cut down plants because they use a lot of water and the state is in a drought, but the court rejected that argument.

On Tuesday, a lawsuit Butte County cultivation restrictions was filed. The county's Measure A, which was approved by voters in November, restricts the size of gardens but not the number of plants. Plaintiffs argue that it prevents them from growing the marijuana necessary to treat their conditions.

On Tuesday, the Anaheim city council toughened its prohibition on dispensaries. The council passed a revised ordinance that now threatens landlords who rent to dispensaries with up to a year in jail and a $2,500 a day fine.

Colorado

On Tuesday, a bill to allow a continued medical marijuana system passed the state Senate. The bill would allow residents with medical marijuana cards to continue to use dispensaries until at least 2019. That means people with cards could continue to buy marijuana for a lower price than in the adult retail market because medical marijuana has lower taxes. The bill is Senate Bill 115, sponsored by Sen. Owen Hill (R- Colorado Springs).

Connecticut

On Monday, a state commissioner agreed to expand the list of qualifying ailments. Consumer Protection Commissioner Jonathan Harris said this morning that he will follow the recommendation of the program's Board of Physicians and is drafting new regulations to include sickle cell disease, post-surgical back pain with a condition called chronic radiculopathy, and severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis to the list of qualifying conditions. But that's not the end of it. Now, the proposal must be approved by the state attorney general and then by the General Assembly's Regulation Review Committee. A vote there could come by spring.

Florida

On Saturday, Florida sheriffs objected to a pending medical marijuana bill. The Florida Sheriffs Association has come out against Senate Bill 528 while meeting at their winter conference in Tallahassee. The sheriffs, with all their medical expertise, say that "smoked marijuana is not medicine" and list the medical conditions for which medical marijuana can be used. They have other demands, too; click on the link to read their press release.

On Tuesday, a new poll had medical marijuana doing well. A new Gravis Insights poll has support for medical marijuana at 64% in the Sunshine State. The poll comes as the legislature prepares to take up a medical marijuana bill, Senate Bill 528, and with the prospect of another initiative in 2016 looming. Last year's medical marijuana initiative won 57% of the vote, but was defeated because, as a constitutional amendment, it needed 60% of the vote to pass.

Illinois

On Monday, the state issued medical marijuana licenses. Gov. Bruce Rauner ® Monday issued medical marijuana licenses and permits to qualifying growers and sellers. The move came after former Gov. Pat Quinn (D) failed to act on the permits before his term expired. See the full list of licenses and permits here.

Maine

Last Friday, the state's high court ruled that using medical marijuana can make parents unfit. The Maine Supreme Judicial Court has ruled in a child custody case that even though medical marijuana is legal in the state, its use can make a person an unfit parent. "Determining what is in the best interest of the child necessarily involves considering whether a parent's ability to care for his or her child is impaired, including by his or her marijuana use. As with any medication or substance, the question of whether a parent's ingestion of marijuana is legal is only part of the equation. The more important question is whether that ingestion negatively affects, limits or impairs a parent's capacity to parent his or her child," Chief Justice Leigh Saufley wrote in the eight-page decision. The case is Daggett v. Sternick.

Mississippi

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill was filed. State Sen. Deborah Dawkins (D-District 48) has filed Senate Bill 2318, which would allow patients with specified conditions to use medical marijuana. The bill doesn't envision dispensaries, but would allow patients to grow their own with a physician's recommendation.

Missouri

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill was filed. Rep. Dave Hinson (R-St. Clair) has filed a full-fledged medical marijuana bill. The bill would allow patients to possess up to 2.5 ounces and would require that the medicine be grown in the state. The measure is House Bill 800.

North Dakota

On Tuesday, a medical marijuana bill was filed. Rep. Pamela Anderson (D-Fargo) has introduced House Bill 1430, which would allow patients with qualifying conditions to use medical marijuana. But there is a big loophole. Patients could also qualify if they suffer "any persistent or chronic illness or condition... if the illness or condition may be improved by the use of marijuana."

Ohio

On Tuesday, a CBD medical marijuana bill was filed. Rep. Wes Retherford (R-Hamilton) has filed House Bill 33, which would allow doctors to prescribe high-CBD, low-THC cannabis oil to treat seizure disorders. The bill would make the oil available at a limited number of hospitals in the state.

Oregon

Last Friday, the state barred medical marijuana patients from being child care providers. The state Early Learning Council has voted to bar patients from being child care providers. The decision follows a six-month temporary rule that was issued last August and gave patients an ultimatum: your patient card or your child care business.

Tennessee

On Monday, a low-THC cannabis oil bill was filed. State Rep. Jeremy Faison (R-District 11) today introduced House Bill 197, which would allow the use of cannabis oil with less than 0.9% THC for medical purposes.

Virginia

On Monday, a CBD medical marijuana bill won a committee vote. A bill that would allow epilepsy patients to use low-THC, high-CBD medical marijuana won a committee vote Monday. Senate Bill 1235 passed the Senate Courts of Justice Committee on an 11-2 vote.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org].

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ASA Activist Newsletter - Feb 2015

 February 05, 2015 |  William Dolphin

In this Issue:

•Washington State Lobby Day Draws Hundreds

•Motion for dismissal for Kettle Falls Five

•Pediatricians Call for Research, Rescheduling, Access

•Illinois Announces Scores of Medical Cannabis Permits

•Israel Holds Cannabis Tech Conference

•Pomo Nation First Tribe to Grow Medical Cannabis

•ASA Touts Unity Conference in USA Today Ad

___________________

Washington State Lobby Day Draws Hundreds

WA_lobby.jpg

More than 300 medical cannabis patients and advocates converged on the Washington state Capitol late last month for a day of citizen lobbying sponsored by the Washington State Chapter of Americans for Safe Access. Led by ASA’s Executive Director Steph Sherer and Legislative Analyst Kari Boiter, who lives in the state and helped found the chapter, Medical Cannabis Day featured a morning of workshops, a midday legislative briefing and a full afternoon of citizen lobbying in which the assembled advocates visited scores of state elected officials to ensure that patients' voices are at the forefront as state policymakers debate the future of medical cannabis.

The briefing for legislators and their staff featured ASA’s Sherer, Neuropathic Pain specialist Dr. Jake Felice, licensed cannabis business co-founder Oscar Velasco from Dockside, union organizer Patrick MacKay from United Food and Commercial Workers, patient caregiver Dale Rogers, and Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access organizer Patrick Seifert.

The lobby day generated considerable attention in state media outlets, and a key legislator, Senator Ann Rivers, changed to a more supportive position less than 24 hours later and now reportedly will remove restrictions on sales of dried cannabis flowers from the pending bill she sponsored.

The state’s 16-year-old medical program has been under debate since voters there approved a new, parallel system for adult access to cannabis. Regulation of medical distribution that was approved by the legislature in previous years was derailed by threats to elected officials from federal prosecutors in the US Attorney’s office.

"Everyone agrees that statewide medical marijuana regulations are needed to preserve patient rights," said Sherer. "But under current proposals, existing medical distribution centers would be phased out in favor of the adult-use marketplace, which is plagued by inconsistent and inadequate supply, as well as unreasonably high taxes."

Despite having no state mechanism for licensing, Washington’s medical cannabis businesses contributed more than $14 million to state coffers in Fiscal Year 2014, according to the state Department of Revenue.

"Throughout the I-502 implementation process, repeated assurances have been made that medical marijuana will not be negatively impacted and that safe, affordable access remains a priority,” said Sherer. “Now, it's time for policymakers to deliver on that promise."

More information:

ASA one-pager on Washington State's medical cannabis program

ASA blog on the event from ASA’s Kari Boiter

___________________

Ailing Patient Asks for Dismissal in Kettle Falls Five Case

harveypress.jpg

An ailing, elderly patient facing federal trial in Washington State has asked the court to dismiss his case because of the new Congressional measure that bans the Department of Justice (DOJ) from interfering in state medical cannabis programs.

Larry Harvey, 71, is one of the Kettle Falls Five, members of a family from rural northeastern Washington State that have been indicted in a widely watched federal medical marijuana case. The motion filed by his defense attorney asks for either dismissal of his case or an order preventing further prosecution. Harvey suffers from several serious medical conditions and was recently diagnosed with State IV pancreatic cancer, which has metastasized to his liver.

Harvey's motion argues that Washington’s medical cannabis law is undermined by discouraging lawful patients from participating in the state program because of the threat of federal prosecution. "Prosecuting persons who may be operating in compliance with state medical marijuana laws prevents states from implementing their own laws," reads the brief written by Harvey's attorney Robert Fischer, which also argues that "federal prosecutions take away Washington's authority to determine for itself whether someone is in compliance with its laws or not."

Harvey's motion to dismiss comes just a month after President Obama signed the federal government’s fiscal-year 2015 budget bill, which contains the new limits on federal enforcement. The historic bipartisan amendment sponsored by Representatives Dana Rohrabacher (R, CA) and Sam Farr (D, CA) prohibits DOJ funds from being spent to block implementation of state medical cannabis laws. Federal prosecutions such as that of the Kettle Falls Five run contrary to the intent of Congress.

The Kettle Falls Five are Harvey; his wife Rhonda Firestack-Harvey, 56; her son Rolland Gregg, 33; daughter-in-law Michelle Gregg, 36; and friend of the family Jason Zucker, 39. All are qualified patients with serious medical conditions.

In August 2012, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) raided the rural property of Harvey and his wife and seized 44 premature marijuana plants. Federal prosecutors charged the five with conspiracy to manufacture and distribute marijuana, manufacturing and distribution of marijuana, maintaining a drug-involved premises, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime. Federal agents confiscated the family's 2007 Saturn, $700 in cash, their legally owned firearms, and other personal property. Each defendant faces a mandatory minimum sentence of 10 years in prison if convicted.

ASA brought Harvey to DC twice last year to lobby in support of the Congressional amendment that is the basis for his motion to dismiss. ASA also held a DC lobby day in April focused on the measure's passage.

A hearing on Harvey’s motion to dismiss is scheduled for February 12 at 10am in U.S. District Court in Spokane, Washington, before Judge Thomas O. Rice. Trial is currently set for February 23.

Further information:

Motion to dismiss filed by Larry Harvey of the Kettle Falls Five

Congressional measure restricting DOJ enforcement in medical marijuana states

___________________

Pediatric Doctors Support Cannabis Rescheduling, Research, Access

A professional organization representing more than 62,000 pediatricians in the US last month endorsed the use of cannabis for some seriously ill children and called on the federal government to conduct more research and change the classification of the drug to recognize its medical uses.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued the new policy statement in its journal Pediatrics. The group reiterated its opposition to outright legalization and said that cannabis should undergo FDA clinical trials but noted that “some children who may benefit from cannabinoids cannot wait for a meticulous and lengthy research process.” For that reason, “the Academy recognizes some exceptions should be made for compassionate use in children."

The AAP also recommends that cannabis be changed from a Schedule 1 controlled substance -- defined as having "no currently accepted medical use in the United States" -- to Schedule II, where it would be classified with drugs such as oxycodone that may be used in treatment under a doctor’s supervision. That change, the AAP notes, would enable more research and development of pharmaceutical cannabinoids.

More Information:

AAP Statement on Medical Cannabis

___________________

Illinois Grants Scores of Medical Cannabis Licenses

An unexpected turnabout in Illinois late last month saw Gov. Bruce Rauner issue more than 70 state permits to cultivate and distribute medical cannabis to registered patients. The move came only a week after the governor said he had halted the granting of any licenses until a legal review was complete of the application process begun under his predecessor, Pat Quinn. The change of heart came after an internal review and consultation with state Attorney General Lisa Madigan, according to the governor’s office.

Eighteen cultivation centers were approved to begin growing cannabis; three other applicants are undergoing additional review. Distribution permits were issued for 53 companies, with five more pending further review. To gain final approval, applicants must to pay state fees, register all employees and show they have sufficient operating funds. It will still be several months before registered patients will be able to legally obtain medicine.

Many of the successful applicants in Illinois are former state officials. A manager of one of the cultivation companies, Ieso LLC, is a former director of the Illinois Department of Agriculture. Green Thumb Industries, awarded three cultivation licenses as well as one to operate a dispensary, has a former state representative who is a close ally of the House Speaker as a consultant and lobbyist.

More Information:

Illinois Medical Cannabis Pilot Program

___________________

Israel Holds Cannabis Conference this Month

Long a leading center for medical cannabis research, Israel this month is the site of an investor’s conference, CannaTech Israel. Those in attendance will include Dr. Alan Shackelford, whose pediatric patient Charlotte Figi is the namesake for the cannabis strain Charlotte’s Web that garnered intense media attention after treatment with it led to a dramatic improvement in her severe seizure condition.

Israeli medical cannabis producers have bred a similar strain that is rich in the non-psychoactive cannabinoid called cannabidiol or CBD and low in the psychoactive one, THC. Like Charlotte’s Web, the Israeli strain does not produce intoxication. It is currently available only in Israel and only as an oral medication dubbed “Rafael,” after the healing angel. But international health officials as well as investors from Australia, the US and elsewhere are eager for the chance to export it from Israel.

The medical cannabis advisor for the country’s Health Ministry says agriculture officials favor making Israeli strains available for export, but officials in other branches of the government oppose it. The Czech Republic’s health minister was unsuccessful last year in an attempt to arrange for the import of Israeli cannabis. Among the current international ventures based in Israel is a well-funded Australian company, PhytoTech Medical, which is working with researchers at Jerusalem’s Hebrew University to develop controlled-dose cannabis pills.

___________________

Pomo Nation First Tribe to Cultivate Medical Cannabis

A large cultivation operation in northern California will break ground this month, the first on land belonging to a Native American tribe. The project follows a policy change by the Department of Justice that says federal authorities will not interfere with cannabis cultivation or distribution on native lands, so long as it satisfies federal enforcement concerns. The Pomo Nation in Mendocino County, part of what is known as California’s Green Triangle, has entered into an agreement with an outside investor, FoxBarry Farms, which has worked with several tribes on a variety of economic development projects. FoxBarry will develop greenhouses for the tribe and manage distribution of the medical cannabis in California. Plans include 90,000 square feet of greenhouses and 20,000 square feet of indoor cultivation, to be developed with the help of consultants from United Cannabis in Colorado. FoxBarry is reportedly developing three medical cannabis operations on different tribal lands in California. According to a company spokesperson, another tribe will be announcing its plans in a month or two.

___________________

ASA Touts Unity Conference in USA Today

Americans for Safe Access announced its third annual Unity Conference, "Wellness is Winning: Advancing Evidence Based Medical Cannabis Policy," with an ad in the USA Today Super Bowl Preview. The Washington, D.C. conference will highlight medical and legal experts, policymakers, as well as workshops and panels focusing on research, strategic planning, and skills building. On Tuesday, March 31, ASA will host a press conference and Congressional lobbying visits by hundreds of patient advocates.

The conference opens Saturday, March 28, with a keynote address by researcher Dr. Ethan Russo, a former adviser to GW Pharmaceuticals, followed by panel discussions and stakeholder breakout sessions. Sunday, March 29, will feature experts discussing medical cannabis research, the state of policy reform in the U.S., and the harmonization of regulatory approaches.

Monday, March 30, is dedicated to educational and skills building workshops and an awards dinner. Tuesday, March 31 will be a Lobby Day Training in the morning, followed by a press conference at 11am, and Congressional visits that afternoon with hundreds of conference participants advancing federal medical marijuana policy reform.

Current conference sponsors include the American Herbal Products Association, Mary's Medicinals, and OrganiCann.

Further information:

Third Annual National Medical Cannabis Unity Conference:http://www.nationalmedicalcannabisunityconference.org/

Tentative conference agenda:http://www.nationalmedicalcannabisunityconference.org/tentative_agenda_for_unity

Media registration:http://www.nationalmedicalcannabisunityconference.org/request_unity_press_pass

___________________

CONTEST: Medical Marijuana Week, Feb 8-15

StephWinning.jpg

You + a Pic = A chance To Win! Simply snap a photo of yourself with the hashtag #WellnessIsWinning, tag it with #MMJWeekUnity15 on Instagram, Twitter or upload directly on our Facebook page. Winners will be announced on February 20, 2015. Winners will be determined by the number of votes on Facebook.

How to Enter: Upload a photo on ASA's Facebook Page under #MMJWeekUnity15 or submit one via Twitter or Instagram by using the hashtag #MMJWeekUnity15.

Prizes include: (1) a Free trip to the 2015 National Medical Cannabis Unity Conference in Washington, D.C. including registration, hotel and travel; (2) ASA Swag Bag with ASA Vape Pen, ASA T-shirt, ASA Water Bottle & ASA Tote Bag; (3) 3. ASA T-shirt, ASA Banner Pen & ASA Water Bottle.

How to Vote: Go to ASA’s Facebook Page. Under #MMJWeekUnity15 click on 'Vote' and then select your favorite photo. If you submit a photo, encourage your friends and family to vote for your photo by sharing your photo contest entry on Facebook.

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

February 11, 2015

MMJ%20leaf%20and%20stethoscope%20KY%20OD

The Veterans Administration hints at coming changes around medical marijuana, California and Washington see state-wide regulation bills filed, both houses in Virginia have passed similar CBD bills, and more. Let's get to it:

National

On Wednesday, the VA told a House committee it is actively exploring medical marijuana for veterans. A top Department of Veterans Affairs official told the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs today "there are active discussions going on now" about how to deal with the growing number of vets seeking to use medical marijuana for their ailments. Dr. Carolyn Clancy, the VA's interim under secretary for health, told the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs on Wednesday "there's an incredible opportunity for us to learn from some of those experiences, but I think that we have to be careful given the variation in legal issues."

California

Last Thursday, Santa Ana held a lottery for dispensary owners to obtain permits. More than 600 people had paid a $1,690 application fee for a chance to be chosen. Now, the lottery winners must pay $12,086 for the next stage of permitting. Dispensaries will only be allowed in two areas zoned for industrial use.

Last Friday, a federal judge temporarily blocked a forfeiture action against the Berkeley Patients Group. The federal government had sought to shut down the landmark dispensary in May 2013, but the dispensary, its landlord, and the city of Berkeley fought back. The city was struck from the lawsuit for lack of standing, but appealed. It then sought to stay the forfeiture action until its appeal was resolved. Last Friday, US District Judge Jon Tigar agreed.

On Monday, a medical marijuana regulation bill supported by cops and cities was introduced. Assemblyman Ken Cooley (D-Rancho Cordova) filed Assembly Bill 266 with the backing of the California League of Cities and the California Police Chiefs Association. The bill seeks to impose state-wide regulation on the Golden State's medical marijuana scene, but California NORML says it has some objectionable features, including too stringent transportation regulations, inadequate provision for the licensing of current growers, and a prohibition on licenses for people with prior drug offenses.

Florida

On Tuesday, a second state medical marijuana bill was filed. Rep. Greg Steube (R-Sarasota) has filed House Bill 683, which would only allow people with eight specified medical conditions to use it and which bars the used of smoked marijuana. Sen. Jeff Brandes (R-St. Petersburg) earlier filed another, less restrictive medical marijuana bill. "The big differences are, it doesn't allow for smokeable marijuana," Steube said Tuesday of his bill and Brandes' bill. "Brandes, in his bill, says a doctor could prescribe (medical marijuana) if you had severe and persistent pain. That was taken out. We kept it to specific diseases."

Virginia

Last Thursday, a CBD medical marijuana bill passed the Senate. The Senate approved Senate Bill 1235, which would allow for the use of high-CBD cannabis oil. A similar bill is before the House of Delegates.

On Tuesday, a CBD medical marijuana bill passed the House. The House of Delegates approved House Bill 1445 on a vote of 98-1. Similar legislation has already passed the Senate. The bills would allow for the use of cannabis oil for children suffering medical conditions that bring on life-threatening seizures.

Washington

On Monday, a statewide medical marijuana regulation bill was introduced. Reps. Luis Moscoso (D-Kirkland) and Maureen Walsh (R-Walla Walla) have introduced House Bill 2058 to create a licensed and regulated medical marijuana system for the state. The bill is identical to legislation that passed both the House and Senate in 2011 only to be vetoed by then Gov. Christine Gregoire (D) over fears of federal intervention.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

February 18, 2015

MMJ%20leaf%20and%20stethoscope%20KY%20OD

The Kettle Falls 5 will have to face federal trial, a bill to fold the Washington state medical market into the recreational one has passed the Senate, there's movement toward dispensaries in Hawaii and Michigan, and much more. Let's get to it:

California

On Tuesday, a bill to end organ transplant denials for medical marijuana patients was referred to the Assembly Health Committee. Assembly member Marc Levine (D-San Rafael) earlier this month introduced Assembly Bill 258, the Medical Cannabis Organ Transplant Act, a bill aimed at preventing medical marijuana patients from being denied organ transplants The Medical Cannabis Organ Transplant Act is sponsored by Americans for Safe Access (ASA), which has long advocated for patients seeking organ transplants, including Norman B. Smith, a medical marijuana patient who died in 2012 after being denied a liver transplant at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Also on Tuesday, the Santa Ana city council approved spending $880,000 to shut down unpermitted dispensaries. The move comes as the city is poised to become the first in Orange County to allow permitted dispensaries. The enforcement costs—including hiring five new police officers and a sergeant—will be borne by the legal dispensaries, which are set to open on July 1.

Also on Tuesday, the Long Beach city council voted to create a special task force to offer input on a new medical marijuana ordinance. The ordinance, which would allow 18 dispensaries citywide, has been approved once by the council but needs to go back for a second approval in April. If the task force recommends any changes, they will be taken up then.

Also on Tuesday, the Pismo Beach city council banned medical marijuana delivery services. The city already banned dispensaries, but the council voted unanimously to update the ban and include mobile delivery services because they create "the same adverse impacts" as brick and mortar stores.

Colorado

On Tuesday, the Colorado Cannabis Chamber said it supported tightening restrictions on caregivers. The chamber, which represents recreational marijuana business interests, has come out in support of Senate Bill 14, which would require medical marijuana caregivers to be licensed and registered with the state. The measure would help law enforcement maintain a tighter control on who is growing how much marijuana for whom. The chamber said the "caregivers system is being abused" by people who don't want to abide by the same regulations as the rest of the industry. The bill awaits a hearing in the House Public Health Care and Human Services Committee.

Hawaii

On Tuesday, a bill that would allow for dispensaries won a House committee vote. Fourteen years after the legislature approved medical marijuana, it may finally get around to approving dispensaries. A bill that would do that, House Bill 321, was approved by the House Committee on Health and the Judiciary Tuesday. It now goes before the House Committee on Finance. A similar proposal in the Senate was slated for a decision in a joint committee hearing today.

Iowa

On Monday, Iowans pleaded for the expansion of the state's medical marijuana program. A small number of Iowa patients and family members appeared before state legislators to ask for expansion of the state's medical marijuana program, which they say is effectively useless as is. Each speaker called on legislators to expand the law to allow them to legally produce and obtain the high-CBD cannabis oils that could aid them. A law passed last year allows Iowan's to use the cannabis oils, but not to produce or import them.

Michigan

Last Thursday, the legislature began preparing to take up a bill that would explicitly allow dispensaries. Supporters of medical marijuana are readying themselves to push a dispensary bill through the legislature. Rep. Mike Callton (R-Nashville) announced that he would sponsor a new bill to regulate "provisioning centers." The bill is not yet available on the legislative website. Similar measures were expected to pass last year, but stalled at session's end.

New Mexico

Last Thursday, the state proposed revisions in its medical marijuana program. The Health Department's hearing officer charged with making recommendations for changes in the state's medical marijuana program issued her report and she is recommending increasing the allowable concentrations of THC in marijuana products from 60% to 70% and scrapping a rule requiring patients to submit biometric information when applying for registry cards. The department is now "in the process of reviewing" the recommendations. Click on the link for more detail and more recommendations.

North Carolina

Last Wednesday, a medical marijuana bill was filed. A group of legislators has filed a full-blown medical marijuana bill, House Bill 78. The state approved a CBD cannabis oil bill last year.

Oklahoma

Last Wednesday, a CBD cannabis oil bill passed the House.The House approved House Bill 2154, on a 98-2 vote. The bill would authorize an investigation into the use of cannabis oil for children with epilepsy. The bill now heads to the Senate.

Washington

Last Thursday, a federal judge rejected a request from the Kettle Falls 5 to throw out their charges. Five Washington state medical marijuana patients being prosecuted by federal authorities will have to go to trial. A federal judge refused to dismiss the criminal case against them, even though the prosecution appears to violate Justice Department guidelines for medical marijuana prosecutions and even though marijuana is now legal in their state.

Last Friday, a http://www.thestranger.com/blogs/slog/2015/02/13/21708779/state-senate-passes-republican-pot-bill-that-combines-medical-and-recreational-markets]Republican-sponsored bill to combine the recreational and medical markets passed[/url] the Senate. The state Senate has passed Senate Bill 5052, sponsored by Sen. Ann Rivers (R-La Center). It would combine medical and recreational in a single market, require medical marijuana users to enter their names on a state registry, reduce the number of plants patients could grow from 15 to six, and allow cultivation co-ops only if they are at least 15 miles from a retail store and everyone is on the registry. The bill was opposed by patient advocates. Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles (D-Seattle) had offered a competing bill, Senate Bill 5519, but that has not been voted on, and all of her amendments to the Republican bill were voted down.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

February 25, 2015

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Whew! There are medical marijuana bills all over the place, a leading Democratic politician gets targeted for her anti-medical marijuana stance, and the Kettle Falls Five (now Four) trial gets underway. Let's get to it:

National

Over the weekend, activists targeted Debbie Wasserman Schultz over her medical marijuana stance. Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz wants to move over to the US Senate, but she won't be getting any help from medical marijuana supporters. She opposed last year's medical marijuana initiative, and that has angered advocates. "She’s voted repeatedly to send terminally ill patients to prison. And we’re certainly going to make sure Floridians know that — not to mince words," said Bill Piper, national affairs director with the Washington-based Drug Policy Alliance (DPA). DPA has been joined by People United for Medical Marijuana in Florida, the Marijuana Policy Project, and Americans for Safe Access in coming out against Wasserman Schultz. She opposed last year's medical marijuana initiative.

California

Last Friday, Butte County hired six code enforcement officers to begin enforcement of Measure A, the voter-approved measure that restricts medical marijuana grows in the county. Code enforcement officers and deputies will go door-to-door in selected rural areas of the county to inform residents about the new restrictions.

Colorado

Last Wednesday, a bill to regulate medical marijuana got stripped down. Senate Bill 115, which seeks to make the state's medical marijuana system more like its recreational system, won preliminary approval in the Senate, but only after some of its more controversial proposals were stripped out. Now absent from the bill are a move to crackdown on medical caregiver growers and rules requiring marijuana edibles to be refrigerated. The measure now renews the medical marijuana regulations that were passed in 2010.

Georgia

On Monday, a CBD cannabis oil bill won a committee vote. The House Judiciary Non-Civil Committee unanimously approved House Bill 1, sponsored by Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon). The bill was amended to restore a maximum 5% THC level (up from 3%) and to limit the personal information police can access whether verifying a medical marijuana authorization, but an amendment that would have reinstated illnesses removed at the request of law enforcement failed.

On Wednesday, the House passed the CBD cannabis oil bill. The House approved House Bill 1, which allows for the use of low-THC, high-CBC cannabis oil to treat seizures and other major health conditions. The measure now goes to the Senate.

Kansas

On Monday, a CBD cannabis oil bill won a House committee vote. For the first time, a measure allowing some form of medical marijuana has won a vote in the state legislature. The House Health and Human Services Committee Monday approved House Bill 2282, which would allow for the use of low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oil for seizure disorders.

Minnesota

On Monday, medical marijuana workers unionized. Workers at Minnesota Medical Solutions, which will operate four medical marijuana dispensaries, have signed a labor agreement with the company under the auspices of the United Food and Commercial Workers (UCFW), Local 1189. The union is also in discussions about representing workers at the other four planned dispensaries in the state, which will be operated by LeafLine Labs. The UFCW has also organized marijuana workers in California, Colorado, and Washington.

Missouri

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill was set for a hearing. Rep. Dave Hinson's (R-St. Clair) House Bill 800, which would allow for medical marijuana for eligible payments, was set to get a House.

New York

On Monday, there was talk of kosher medical marijuana coming to the state. Orthodox Jews in New York may soon be able to get kosher medical marijuana. Rabbi Moshe Elefant, head of the Orthodox Union's kosher certification agency said he has held "preliminary discussions" with several companies seeking to obtain a kosher seal of approval for medical marijuana. Click on the link for more.

North Dakota

Last Wednesday, the House killed a medical marijuana bill. A bill that would have brought medical marijuana to the Northern Plains was on a vote of 26-67. The bill, House Bill 1430, was opposed by Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem, who warned of public safety and regulatory concerns and called it a step backward in fighting impaired driving.

Tennessee

On Tuesday, a CBD cannabis oil bill was delayed. The House Criminal Justice Subcommittee is delaying a bill that would legalize low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oil. Lawmakers decided Tuesday to bump any action back by at least two weeks. The bill is House Bill 197.

Virginia

Last Wednesday, the legislature approved two CBD cannabis oil bills. The state Senate approved House Bill 1445, which would allow people suffering from epileptic seizures to use CBD and THC-A cannabis oils. It has already been approved by the House and now goes to the governor's desk. An identical companion bill introduced in the Senate, Senate Bill 1235, has also already passed both houses and is on the governor's desk.

Washington

Last Thursday, the Kettle Falls Five became the Kettle Falls Four. Federal prosecutors have dropped charges against 71-year-old Larry Harvey, elder member of the Kettle Falls Five, Washington state medical marijuana patients being prosecuted despite pot being legal in the state and despite Justice Department policy guidance that would appear to preclude such prosecutions. The charges against Harvey were dropped because he's about to die of pancreatic cancer, which has spread to his liver. But his family members still face decades in prison for growing their own medicine. "I'm thankful the charges against me have been dropped so that I can focus on my battle with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer," Harvey said in a statement. "However, if the Department of Justice truly has concerns for my well-being, it will dismiss the case against my entire family. I thought the law passed by Congress and signed by President Obama was supposed to stop the DOJ from prosecuting my family, but so far, there's been little relief."

On Wednesday, the Kettle Falls Four trial got underway in Spokane. The trial of an Eastern Washington family accused of violating federal marijuana laws by growing their own medical marijuana legally under state law began today. The family is known as the Kettle Falls Five, but it's now the Kettle Falls Four after charges were dismissed against terminally ill patriarch Larry Harvey. The prosecution of the Harveys runs counter to Obama administration policy and congressional desire, but continues anyway.

West Virginia

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill was filed. On the last day to file Senate bills in the legislative session, Sen. Mitch Carmichael (R-Ripley) introduced Senate Bill 546, the "Creating Compassionate Use Act for Medical Cannabis." The bill would allow for medical marijuana for designated debilitating medical conditions and would require patients and caregivers to be registered with the state. The bill now goes before the Senate Health and Human Services Committee.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

March 04, 2015

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A near total victory for the Kettle Falls Four, California continues to wrestle with medical marijuana, CBD cannabis oil bills pop up, and a Utah medical marijuana bill stays alive. Let's get to it:

California

Last Tuesday, the Riverside city council voted to send an initiative to the ballot that would allow some medical marijuana dispensaries. The measure will be on the June 8 ballot.

Last Thursday, the Clear Lake city council adopted an ordinance banning grows within the city. Councilmembers said that was the only way to eliminate large grows, but patients and advocates protested loudly, to no avail. Legal action by patients and advocates is coming next.

On Monday, the Pismo Beach city council killed a proposed ban on medical marijuana deliveries. The council had voted last month to introduce an amendment to do so, but chose not to conduct a second reading.

On Tuesday, the San Diego city council cleared a key hurdle for dispensaries to open by rejecting environmental appeals filed against them. That means the six proposed dispensaries are one step closer to getting final approval from the Planning Commission.

Also on Tuesday, Tehama County supervisors voted to ban medical marijuana grows. The only exception is for locked outbuildings. Gardens that are currently in compliance will be grandfathered in, but only until next January.

Florida

On Monday, a jury acquitted a medical marijuana patient in a historic verdict. A Broward County jury effectively nullified the state's marijuana laws by acquitting a defendant who testified that he grew and used pot for medicinal purposes. Jesse Teplicki testified at his trial that he smoked marijuana to treat the nausea and suppressed appetite that had been plaguing him for years. The jury deliberated for less than an hour before returning with a verdict of "not guilty." Teplicki, 50, was looking at up to five years in state prison if convicted.

Georgia

Last Thursday, a CBD cannabis oil bill passed the House. The House approved House Bill 1, which allows for the use of low-THC, high-CBC cannabis oil to treat seizures and other major health conditions. The measure now goes to the Senate.

On Monday, a new, weaker CBD cannabis oil bill was filed in the Senate. The House last week passed a CBD cannabis oil bill, but now, Sen. Lindsey Tippins has filed a new bill that would not make the drug available, but would instead set up a four-year study. The Tippins bill is not yet up on the legislative website.

Iowa

On Sunday, a new poll showed strong support for medical marijuana in the state. A new Des Moines Register poll has support for medical marijuana at 70%, up from 59% a year ago. The state approved a CBD cannabis oil bill last year, but patient advocates say that law is useless because it doesn't provide for distribution of the medication.

Kansas

Last Monday, a CBD cannabis oil bill won a House committee vote. For the first time, a measure allowing some form of medical marijuana has won a vote in the state legislature. The House Health and Human Services Committee Monday approved House Bill 2282, which would allow for the use of low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oil for seizure disorders.

Missouri

Last Thursday, the state issued licenses for CBD cannabis oil production. The Department of Agriculture this week issued two licenses for the cultivation of low-THC marijuana to be used to make CBD cannabis oil for patients. The licenses went to two St. Louis-area non-profits.

Tennessee

Last Thursday, a CBD cannabis oil bill got delayed. The House Criminal Justice Subcommittee is delaying a bill that would legalize low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oil. Lawmakers decided Tuesday to bump any action back by at least two weeks. The bill is House Bill 197.

Utah

Last Friday, a medical marijuana bill won a Senate committee vote. The state Senate Judiciary Committee approved Senate Bill 259, a full-blown medical marijuana bill (except that it doesn't allow smoking it).

On Tuesday, the bill moved again. A bill that appeared delayed only a day earlier was approved for a third Senate reading Tuesday night. Senate Bill 259 would allow people with qualifying illnesses to use marijuana in edible or liquid form and would establish dispensaries to distribute it. If the Senate approves it one more time, it then goes to the House.

Washington

On Wednesday, the Kettle Falls Four won acquittal on most counts. A federal jury in Spokane acquitted the medical marijuana-growing family of four out of five counts, including the most serious ones, but found them guilty of growing between 50 and 100 plants. Federal prosecutors brought the case despite pot being legal in Washington state and despite federal guidance that suggests they shouldn't have. After the verdicts were read, prosecutors sought to jail the four pending sentencing, much to the disbelief of the courtroom crowd, but the judge didn't go for that.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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More Proof That Synthetic Medical Marijuana Pales in Comparison to the Real Thing

"Crude" whole plant formulations seem to work better than synthetic single-molecule ones. Take that, Big Pharma!

By Martin A. Lee / Project CBD

March 6, 2015

medicalcannabis.jpg

A groundbreaking study from Israel has documented the superior therapeutic properties of whole plant CBD-rich Cannabis extract as compared to synthetic, single-molecule cannabidiol (CBD).

Published in the journal Pharmacology & Pharmacy (Feb. 2015), the article directly challenges one of the sacred cows of Big Pharma and the medical-industrial complex — the notion that “crude” botanical preparations are inherently low grade and less effective than pure, single-molecule compounds.

Entitled “Overcoming the Bell-Shaped Dose-Response of Cannabidiol by Using Cannabis Extract Enriched in Cannabidiol,” the article is all the more noteworthy given the contribution of co-author Lumir Hanus, who was instrumental in the discovery of anandamide, the endogenous cannabinoid compound first identified in the mammalian brain in 1992.

Hanus and two Israeli colleagues from Hebrew University of Jerusalem surveyed the scientific literature and noted that during the past fifteen years numerous preclinical studies had focused on the anti-inflammatory effects of pure, single-molecule CBD in animal models of various pathologies, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes. (See preclinical data regarding CBD.)

These studies showed that administration of pure, single-molecule CBD resulted in a bell-shaped dose-response curve, meaning that when the amount of CBD exceeded a certain point its therapeutic impact declined dramatically. “Healing was only observed when CBD was given within a very limited dose range, whereas no beneficial effect was achieved at either lower or higher doses,” the authors observed. This characteristic of single-molecule CBD—manifested as a bell-shaped dose response—imposes serious obstacles that limit its usefulness in a clinical context.

The Israeli team sought to determine whether the administration of a whole plant CBD-rich extract would also generate a bell-shaped dose-response curve when administered to mice. Or would cannabidiol extracted from CBD-rich Cannabis avoid this liability? “The aim of the present study,” the authors explained, “was to find a CBD source that could eliminate the bell-shaped dose-response of purified CBD.”

The scientists obtained a CBD-rich strain called “Avidekel” from Tikkun Olam, an Israeli medical marijuana producer. Referred to as “clone 202” in this study, Avidekel has hardly any THC and therefore is not intoxicating. The origins of Avidekel can be traced to Spain, where breeders developed several phenotypes of “Cannatonic” (as in “cannabis tonic”), including a strain that measures close to 20 percent CBD by dry weight with almost no intoxicating ingredients. (The same high-yielding CBD-dominant strain is known as “ACDC” in California.)

The Israeli researchers extracted CBD-rich oil from clone 202. The extract—consisting of 17.9 percent CBD, 1.1 percent THC, 1.1 percent cannabichromene (CBC), 0.2 percent cannabigerol (CBG), and “traces” of cannabinol (CBN) and cannabivarol (CBDV)—was given to mice to evaluate its anti-inflammatory and painkilling effect.

For comparative purposes, the scientists administered pure, synthetic CBD to another group of mice and assessed its anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. They also compared the extent to which single-molecule CBD and whole plant CBD inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa), a systemic inflammatory signaling molecule. Dysregulation of TNF-alpha production has been implicated in several diseases including cancer, Alzheimer’s, clinical depression, and irritable bowel syndrome.

The pure CBD tests confirmed the findings of earlier preclinical research. Once again, singe-molecule CBD administration generated a bell-shaped dose-response curve with a narrow therapeutic window.

But a different dose response pattern was observed when the clone 202 extract was administered to mice. Rather than showing a bell-shaped curve, where a therapeutic effect could only be achieved at a certain concentration of pure CBD, the whole plant CBD-rich extract caused a direct, dose-dependent inhibition of pain, inflammation, and TNFa production. “In stark contrast to purified CBD,” the Israeli team reported, “the clone extract…provided a clear correlation between the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive responses and the dose, with increasing responses upon increasing doses, which makes this plant medicine ideal for clinical uses.”

Moreover, the Israeli researchers found that a small amount of CBD in the clone extract was needed for significant pain relief compared to the much larger amount of pure CBD required to achieve the same analgesic effect. And whereas pure, single-molecule CBD precipitated a dramatic drop in efficacy if more than a specific dosage was administered, an “overdose” of whole plant CBD-rich extract did not undermine its therapeutic potency. When greater than an optimal dose of the clone 202 oil was administered, its effectiveness leveled off, suggesting that a medicinal plateau had been reached.

The Israeli study found that Cannabis clone 202 extract “is superior over CBD for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.” The greater efficiency of the whole plant extract might be explained by additive or synergistic interactions between CBD and dozens of minor phytocannabinoids and hundreds of non-cannabinoid plant compounds. “It is likely that other components in the extract synergize with CBD to achieve the desired anti-inflammatory action that may contribute to overcoming the bell-shaped dose-response of purified CBD,” the Israeli team surmised.

The scientists also felt it was important to examine how the CBD-rich Cannabis extract compared with commercial painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs. They found that both pure CBD and the clone 202 extract exhibited greater anti-inflammatory potency than aspirin. Aspirin, but not tramadol, registered a slight inhibitory effect on TNFa production, which was negligible in comparison to the strong inhibitory effect of pure CBD and clone 202.

The key finding that CBD in the presence of other Cannabis components improves the dose-response is supported by recent reports documenting the anti-proliferative effect of cannabidiol on tumor cells and the inhibitory effect of CBD on bladder contractility.

“A lot of research has been made to isolate and characterize isolated single constituents of traditional herbal medicine to find their rationale for therapeutic uses,” the Israeli team concluded. “However, our data together with those of others provide legitimation to introduce a new generation of phytopharmaceuticals to treat diseases that have hitherto been treated using synthetic drugs alone. The therapeutic synergy observed with plant extracts results in the requirement for a lower amount of active components, with consequent reduced adverse effects.”

AlterNet

Martin A Lee is the director of Project CBD and the author of Smoke Signals: A Social History of Marijuana Medical, Recreational and Scientific.

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

March 11, 2015

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Historic federal medical marijuana legislation was introduced and endorsed by the New York Times the next day, California localities continue to make life hard for dispensaries, a Utah medical marijuana bill is killed, and more.

National

On Tuesday, a bipartisan trio of senators introduced historic legislation to legalize medical marijuana at the federal level. Sens. Cory Booker (D-NJ), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), and Rand Paul (R-KY) filed the Compassionate Access, Research Expansion, and Respect States (CARERS) Act, which would end the federal prohibition on medical marijuana and allow states to set their own policies. The bill is not yet available on the congressional website. Click the link for more details.

On Wednesday,The New York Times endorsed the federal medical marijuana bill. The editorial of the nation's "newspaper of record" wrote today that the bill, which would clear away federal impediments to state-level medical marijuana, "deserves to be passed by Congress and enacted into law." Click on the link for their reasoning.

California

Last Friday, a poll found that Riverside voters were likely to reject dispensaries. Whether to allow them will be on the June 2 ballot, but the poll has 56% opposed and only 46% in favor.

On Tuesday, the VA in Southern California announced it would allow the use of medical marijuana with prescription opiates. Click on the link to read the policy.

Also on Tuesday, the Costa Mesa city council punted on dispensaries. The council decided to kill a draft dispensary ordinance and table the issue until next year, when it might write its own ballot measure to compete with two local initiatives that have already qualified for the ballot.

Also on Tuesday, the Upland city council decided against a special election for a dispensary ballot measure. Now, voters will have to wait until next year, and that has infuriated dispensary supporters, who are threatening a recall effort.

Georgia

Last, Thursday, Georgia families swarmed the state capitol in support of a strong medical marijuana bill. Dozens of Georgia families streamed into the state capitol in Atlanta yesterday to crank up the pressure on the Senate to pass a medical marijuana bill. House Bill 1 has already passed the House, but the Senate is now considering an alternate bill, Senate Bill 185, which would only set up a limited trial program for children with epilepsy. The families want House Bill 1.

Idaho

On Monday, a CBD cannabis oil bill was revised to only allow an affirmative defense. The bill, Senate Bill 1169, has been revised to address concerns from law enforcement. It would no longer legalize the use of CBD cannabis oil, but would provide for an affirmative defense in case of arrest. The original bill would have removed CBD cannabis oil from the state's law banning marijuana.

North Carolina

Last Wednesday, a medical marijuana bill moved in the legislature. A bill that would allow for medical marijuana in the Tarheel State has passed its first reading in the House. The bill is House Bill 78

North Dakota

On Tuesday, a House committee voted down a medical marijuana study bill. The Human Services Committee has rejected a resolution calling for an interim study on medical marijuana. The measure was House Concurrent Resolution 3059. The state legislature defeated a medical marijuana bill earlier this session, and backers of the resolution hoped they could keep the conversation going. They couldn't.

Tennessee.

On Monday, a CBD Cannabis bill won a House panel vote. The measure, House Bill 109, was approved by the House Criminal Justice Subcommittee. It now moves to the House Criminal Committee, where chairman William Lamberth (R-Cottontown) says it has his support.

Utah

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill died by one vote. A bill that would have made Utah a medical marijuana state was defeated last night. Senate Bill 259, filed by Sen. Mark Madsen (R-Saratoga Springs) lost on a vote of 15-14 in the Senate.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

March 18, 2015

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The federal medical marijuana bill picks up two more sponsors, San Diego gets its first permitted dispensaries (with numbers two and three in the works), Florida's CBD cannabis oil program is delayed again, and more.

National

On Tuesday, the federal medical marijuana bill got a new cosponsor. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) is the latest. A second Republican senator has also signed on to the Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States (CARERS) Act (Senate Bill 683). Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV) joined fellow Republican Sen. Rand Paul (KY) and Democrats Cory Booker (NJ) and Kirsten Gillibrand (NY)--and now, Boxer, too.

California

Last Wednesday, a Southern California tribe said it was getting in the marijuana business. The Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Tribe is setting aside some 40 acres to grew medical marijuana it will sell to dispensaries across the state.

Also last Wednesday, dispensary advocates filed two lawsuits against the city of Costa Mesa. They came one day after the city killed an ordinance that would have permitted and regulated dispensaries. The suits contend the city should have held a special election this month on two dispensary initiatives instead of delaying until the November 2016 general election.

Last Thursday, San Diego approved its second and third legal dispensaries. The Planning Commission okayed dispensaries in Kearney Mesa and San Ysidro, but delayed approval of one in the Midway district over parking and other access issues. In January, the commission approved the first legal dispensary in the city since medical marijuana became law in 1996. Dozens have operated illegally over the years.

On Tuesday, the Richmond city council voted to cut the number of permitted dispensaries from six to three. There are only three currently operating in the city. It also voted to allow three more permits for edibles manufacturing operations.

On Wednesday, San Diego's first legally permitted dispensary opened for business. A Green Alternative opened this morning at Otay Mesa. Last week, the city approved two more permitted dispensaries. They are the first legal ones to operate in the city.

Florida

On Monday, the state's CBD cannabis oil program was again delayed. For the second time, the Department of Health has posted "final rules" for the program, and now, for the second time, it is being challenged by lawsuits. That pushes back the timeline for getting the program up and running by another 60 to 90 days. It was supposed to be running by January 1.

Georgia

Last Thursday, the Senate passed a restrictive cannabis oil bill. The Senate passed Senate Bill 185, which would allow parents bringing CBD cannabis oil into the state to treat their children with epilepsy to be exempted from criminal prosecution, but would not allow medical marijuana in any other form and would not let adults or children with other diseases use it. The House has passed a broader CBD bill; the Senate Health Committee chair has promised it will try to reconcile the two bills.

Idaho

Last Wednesday, a CBD cannabis oil bill won a Senate committee vote. The Senate State Affairs Committee has narrowly approved a CBD cannabis oil bill, Senate Bill 1146. It passed on a 5-4 vote after law enforcement objections scuttled an earlier bill. The new bill only allows for an affirmative defense; the old one would have explicitly made it legal for patients and providers to possess the oils.

Missouri

Last Wednesday, a medical marijuana bill won a House committee vote. The House Emerging Issues Committee approved HB 800, although it added restrictions;

Montana

On Tuesday, a state senator said she was ready to file a medical marijuana bill. State Sen. Robyn Driscoll (D) says she will file a bill this week to allow the sale for profit of medical marijuana, remove limits on the number of patients a caregiver can grow for, allow for advertising, allow for the trade in plants and seedlings, and remove a requirement that doctors who recommend for more than 25 people in a year be reviewed by the Board of Medical Examiners. The provisions would enact parts of a district judge's decision permanently enjoining portions of a harsh 2011 medical marijuana law that undid much of the state's 2004 voter-approved medical marijuana initiative.

Nevada

On Wednesday, a medical marijuana for pets bill was filed. State Sen. Tick Segerholm (D-Las Vegas) introduced Senate Bill 372, which would allow pet owners to obtain marijuana for their animals upon a veteranarian's certification that it could help. He said he worries that some animals might have adverse reactions, but "you don't know until you try."

New Jersey

On Monday, the state released standards for edibles producers. The Health Department has released regulations for growers who will produce medical marijuana edibles. The guidelines are a first step in a process that is likely to last months before the first edibles are available for sale. Click on the link for more details.

North Dakota

On Monday, the House killed a medical marijuana study bill. Not only does the legislature not want to approve medical marijuana; it doesn't even want to study it. The House earlier killed a medical marijuana bill and now it has killed a study bill, with opponents claiming it wasn't needed because the House Human Services Committee "couldn't find anything that wasn't already taken care of in the hearing process."

Tennessee

On Tuesday, a CBD cannabis oil bill won a House committee vote. The House Criminal Justice Committee Wednesday approved House Bill 197, which would allow for the use of low-THC cannabis oils by specified patients. The bill now goes to the House Health Committee, the last stop before a House floor vote. Companion legislation is moving through the Senate.

Texas

Last Friday, medical marijuana bills were filed in both chambers. Rep. Marissa Marquez (D-El Paso) Friday introduced HB 3785, a full-fledged medical marijuana bill, in the House, and Sen. Jose Menendez (D-San Antonio) filed a companion bill in the Senate. The bills would allow qualifying patients to use and possess small amounts of marijuana and obtain it through regulated dispensaries.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit .

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

March 25, 2015

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There is now a House version of the federal CARERS Act, California regulatory squabbles continue, CBD cannabis oil bills move in the darndest places, and more.

National

On Monday, a House version of the federal medical marijuana bill was filed. Reps. Steve Cohen (D-TN) and Don Young (D-AK) introduced the House version of the CARERS Act filed two weeks ago in the Senate. Both bills would allow states to have medical marijuana without federal interference, reschedule marijuana to Schedule II, allow VA doctors to recommend medical marijuana, allow interstate commerce in CBD cannabis oils, and ease banking problems for the industry. The House version is HR 1538.

California

Last Tuesday, the San Luis Obispo city council approved an odor ordinance aimed at medical marijuana cultivators. After complaints from residents, the council amended the ordinance to apply to any offensive and persistent odors. The ordinance includes provisions specifying when enforcement actions could be taken. One more council vote is necessary for the measure to become law.

Last Friday, several Clearlake residents filed a lawsuit against the ban on cultivation in the city. The lawsuit was filed in Lake County Superior Court and says the recently adopted ban violates both the letter and the spirit of Proposition 215.

On Tuesday, Santa Cruz County supervisors voted to ban commercial medical marijuana production. Supervisors voted 3-2 to allow only limited personal grows. The county says there are 145 illegal pot grows there, up from 80 last fall. The new rules allow for only a 100-square foot garden per parcel. The ban is set to go into effect on May 30, after a second reading.

Last Friday, Upland patient advocates sought a court order to force a special election on dispensaries this year. The California Cannabis Coalition charges that the city council violated election laws when it decided to delay placing a dispensary ballot initiative on the ballot until the 2016 general election. They will get a hearing on the motion in May.

Georgia

On Tuesday, the Senate passed a CBD cannabis oil bill. The state Senate approved House Bill 1, which would allow the use of the oil for eight specified medical conditions. The bill has already passed the House, but because it was amended in the Senate, it has to go back for a final House vote. That was expected to happen today.

Idaho

Last Friday, two CBD cannabis oil bills were headed for Senate floor votes. A bill that would allow for the use of cannabis oil to treat severe forms of epilepsy passed the Senate State Affairs Committee and now heads for a Senate floor vote. The measure is Senate Bill 1106. Another cannabis oil bill that would only allow an affirmative defense, Senate Bill 1146, also awaits a Senate floor vote.

On Tuesday, the Senate approved one of those bills. The state Senate voted 22-12 to approve Senate Bill 1146, which would allow the use of the oil for children with severe forms of epilepsy. The bill had originally only offered an affirmative defense to prosecution, but was amended in the Senate to go further. The bill now heads to the House.

Louisiana

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill was pre-filed. State Rep. Dalton Honore (D-Baton Rouge) has pre-filed a bill that would allow for the use of marijuana for specified medical conditions, including seizure disorders, glaucoma, cancer, and the side effects of cancer treatments. The bill is House Bill 6. Last year, similar legislation failed to get out of committee in the face of opposition from law enforcement. The session begins April 13.

North Carolina

Last Thursday, North Carolinians rallied for a new medical marijuana bill in Raleigh. More than a hundred people rallied at the state capitol today in support of House Bill 317, which would allow for medical marijuana use by terminally ill patients. Rep. Kelly Alexander formally introduced it today.

Tennessee

Last Thursday, a Republican state senator said he would file a medical marijuana bill. State Sen. Steve Dickerson (R-Nashville) said today he is working on a bill that would allow for medical marijuana. He said he expected to have final details by Monday. A Democratic bill in the House has yet to make it out of committee.

Last Saturday, medical marijuana advocates rallied in Johnson City. Hundreds of people showed up for the Smoky Mountain Medical Marijuana Rights Rally and march in Johnson City Saturday. The rally comes as the state legislature considers a number of medical marijuana-related bills.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Feds May Spend Nearly $70 Million On Marijuana For Research

Posted: 03/26/2015

The federal government announced Monday that it is prepared to spend tens of millions of dollars on marijuana research through the University of Mississippi, which houses the only federally legal cannabis garden in the United States.

The new contract, worth a maximum of $68.7 million over five years, was awarded by the National Institutes of Health Monday and posted to the Federal Business Opportunities website. The award is a renewal of a contract with the university that the federal government has held for more than 40 years.

In a statement provided to The Huffington Post, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, an arm of NIH that oversees the marijuana operation at Ole Miss, said, "To serve the research community, NIDA has tried to build farm capacity flexible enough to accommodate various levels of demand for research marijuana and marijuana products over the next five years."

NIDA is already obligated to spend $1.5 million on Ole Miss marijuana research for the 2015 fiscal year, the organization told HuffPost. And while the costliest possible scenario has the federal government spending close to $70 million on marijuana research, NIDA explained that demand at Ole Miss is currently low, and the feds expect they'll spend closer to $8 million over the five-year period unless demand increases.

Last year, Dr. Mahmoud ElSohly, the lead scientist at Ole Miss's marijuana lab, appeared to be getting ready for a large harvest, telling the Los Angeles Times that his team was preparing to grow 30,000 cannabis plants. But it's not clear how many plants the lab intends to cultivate in the coming year.

University of Mississippi researchers in the marijuana lab declined to comment to HuffPost on the federal award or the size of the plant garden in 2015.

The marijuana grown at Ole Miss is the only marijuana legally cultivated, processed and distributed by the federal government. Those crops are also the sole source of marijuana used in Food and Drug Administration-sanctioned research into the plant's medical potential. The university's Marijuana Research Project began in 1968, and the school has supplied medical marijuana to a small number of patients to treat various ailments under the banner of its New Drug program. The program was closed off to new patients in the early 1990s, and while there were as many as 30 patients receiving marijuana from the program at one point, as of 2014 there were only four patients still alive and receiving medical marijuana.

Critics contend that federal research efforts focus too much on the negative effects of the drug, rather than its potential medical benefits. The Drug Enforcement Administration, which must approve any potential researcher's license to handle and test the drug, has also been accused of obstructing research into the plant.

However, a bill recently introduced in Congress aims to break up the federal government's marijuana monopoly by allowing additional research facilities to grow the plant. The bill, known as the CARERS Act, would also reclassify marijuana as a less dangerous substance, which could make research easier.

In a 2014 call for research facilities, the federal government said that it was seeking a facility that could "cultivate and harvest, process, analyze, store, and distribute cannabis (marijuana) for research." The notice also said that researchers hoped to "extract cannabis to produce pure and standardized cannabis extracts" containing various concentrations of THC (the main psychoactive ingredient found in marijuana), CBD (a non-psychoactive compound) and other cannabinoids.

The government said that it was interested in a facility that would "develop new methods for growing cannabis plants containing high THC, low CBD; high CBD, low THC; and equal strength of CBD and THC."

A number of studies in recent years have shown the medical and public health potential of cannabis. Purified forms may attack some forms of aggressive cancer, and marijuana use has been tied to better blood sugar control and may help slow the spread of HIV. One study found that legalization of the plant for medical purposes might even lead to lower suicide rates.

To date, 23 states have legalized marijuana for medical purposes and another 12 have legalized the limited medical use of low-THC strains of marijuana. Four states, along with Washington, D.C., have legalized recreational marijuana, and 19 states have decriminalized the possession of small amounts of the plant.

Still, under federal law marijuana remains illegal and classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning it's considered one of the "most dangerous" substances "with no currently accepted medical use."

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Researcher Closer to Starting Medical Marijuana PTSD Study in Arizona

By TJ Baker | The Daily Chronic

March 28, 2015

         

PHOENIX, AZ — An Arizona researcher is one step closer to starting research on the effect of medical marijuana in treating symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Dr. Sue Sisley, the researcher who was fired last year from the University of Arizona College of Medicine for reasons she believed to be linked to her high-profile work in medical marijuana research, aims to study the impact of four marijuana strains on veterans suffering from PTSD.

Dr.-Sue-Sisley-e1404315629420-261x300.jp

Dr. Sue Sisley

Dr. Sisley said this week she plans to conduct independent research in the Phoenix area, after she was unable to find support at a state university for a study of medical marijuana’s effects on people with post traumatic stress disorder.

The private, federally regulated Institutional Review Board recently approved her research request, she said.

“Our goal is to collect the most objective data so that eventually it can be published in peer reviewed medical journals,” Sisley said.

Dr. Sisley has been working for years to start a clinical trial to study the effects of medical marijuana on PTSD.

“It has been five years now battling the government at all levels to try to get this study underway,” she said.

As veterans continue to use medical marijuana to treat PTSD, she said it is important to find which strains, if any, are the most beneficial.

“I believe that we owe it to these veterans, we have a duty to them, to at least put marijuana through the rigors of a randomized controlled trial to understand if these claims are accurate,” she said.

Now, the study is now waiting for final approval before she can access a federal supply of marijuana for medical research.

Sisley said she is currently looking for a location in Scottsdale or Phoenix to conduct her research. Once Sisley has secured a location to conduct her research, the DEA will inspect the research site.

If the site is approved, the DEA will grant Dr. Sisley a Schedule I research licence, allowing her to purchase medical marijuana from the federal government to conduct the study.

Dr. Sisley estimates that the research will be conducted on approximately 38 veterans over the course of two years.

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

April 01, 2015

MMJ%20leaf%20and%20stethoscope%20KY%20OD

A federal CBD bill is filed, the federal medical marijuana bill picks up more sponsors, and bills are moving (or dying) in a number of state. Let's get to it:

National

Last Thursday, a federal CBD bill was filed. Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA) filed HR 1635, which would amend the Controlled Substance Act to exclude cannabidiol (CDB) and CBD-rich marijuana plants from the definition of marijuana under the act.

As of Tuesday, the House CARERS Act had eight cosponsors. The House version of the federal bill to allow states to move forward on medical marijuana without federal interference is accumulating cosponsors. Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN) introduced it a week ago today, and it now has seven more cosponsors. Click on the link to see who they are.

California

Last Thursday, the Fresno city council voted to allow residents to grow up to four plants. The move would be a step forward for the city, which last year banned all cultivation within the city limits. The council will take a second and final vote on the measure in coming weeks.

Also last Thursday, four Yuba county medical marijuana growers sued the county over its new, restrictive medical marijuana cultivation ordinance. The ordinance allows only for up to 12 plants to be grown inside a structure—but not a residence—and no outdoor grows.

Last Friday, a raided El Dorado County dispensary operator sued the county to recover marijuana and financial and medical records seized during a sheriff's department raid last November. The Pure Life Cannabis Collective has been closed since the raid. The lawsuit charges that the dispensary was legitimate and the raid was not.

Florida

Last Friday, more delays came for the state's CBD medical marijuana program. A Central Florida grower and a South Florida trade association are the latest to file legal challenges to the state Health Department's rules for the program. The program envisions only five growers, and the competition is vicious. Now, there are three active legal challenges, which means the department cannot proceed with the program until they are resolved. This is after an earlier delay caused by an earlier legal challenge.

On Tuesday, an expanded CBD medical marijuana bill won a committee vote. The Senate Health Policy Committee approved a bill that would expand the list of qualifying conditions for the use of CBD cannabis oil, quadruple the number of dispensing organizations to 20, and establishes a time frame for issuing license.

Georgia

Last Wednesday, a CBD medical marijuana bill passed the legislature. The House gave final approval to House Bill 1, which would allow patients with eight specified diseases to use CBD cannabis oil. Gov. Nathan Deal ® said today he will sign the bill.

Last Friday, Gov. Deal signed an executive order to speed expedite the new law. Gov. Nathan Deal ® signed the order to speed up the enactment of House Bill 1, which has passed both houses of the legislature. The bill provides immunity from prosecution for CBD patients who register with the state. Deal said he would sign the bill at the end of the legislative session.

Hawaii

Last Wednesday, a dispensary bill won a pair of committee votes. The Senate Public Health and Public Safety committees have approved House Bill 321, which would create dispensaries and production centers in each county in the state. They also amended the bill to speed up the opening of dispensaries, which would now be set for next year.

Idaho

On Monday, the governor's office pushed back against a CBD cannabis oil bill.Gov. "Butch" Otter ® sent his drug policy point-man to the capitol today to speak out against Senate Bill 1146, which would provide an affirmative defense for parents of children using low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oil to treat severe seizures. Elisha Figueroa, head of the Idaho Office of Drug Policy, warned that "Idaho will be violating federal law if this bill passes." Fourteen other Republican-controlled legislatures have passed similar laws, but they're all violating federal law, too, he said. Figueroa is pushing for a different bill, Senate Bill 1156, which would set up a special program to run trials on a GW Pharma CBD product called Epidiolex.

On Tuesday, the bill was killed in committee. The House State Affairs Committee listened to hours of tearful testimony from supporters of Senate Bill 1146, which would allow for the use of CBD cannabis oil to treat epileptic seizures in children, then voted to kill it Monday.

Iowa

Last Wednesday, a medical marijuana bill won a committee vote. The Senate Ways and Means Committee approved Senate Study Bill 1243, which would allow patients with a number of specified medical conditions to use medical marijuana—but not to smoke it.

Missouri

On Monday, a medical marijuana bill won a committee vote. The House Select Committee on General Laws approved House Bill 800, which would allow for the use of medical marijuana for a handful of specified diseases. It would also allow for up to 30 dispensaries.

New Jersey

Last Thursday, the Assembly approved a trio of medical marijuana bills. Legislators in Trenton Thursday approved adding PTSD to the list of qualifying diseases, and then some. They also approved ACR 224, which would undo the Christie rule that doctors who recommend medical marijuana must be publicly listed and A 4286, which allows dispensaries to share surpluses. The bills now go to the state Senate.

New York

On Wednesday, the state issued final regulations for the medical marijuana program and advocates were not happy. The state has issued final regulations for the program, and they are very similar to the heavily-criticized draft regulations it started out with several months ago. The regs limit the number of dispensaries to 20 and don't add any new qualifying conditions. Assemblyman Richard Gottfried (D-Manhattan), the law's sponsor, said the final regs are needlessly restrictive and "gratuitously cruel."

North Carolina

Last Wednesday, a medical marijuana bill was killed in committee. After an intense hour-long hearing, the House Judiciary Committee voted to kill a medical marijuana bill, House Bill 78. Some supporters of the bill vowed to move to other states, while one Republican foe of the bill, Rep. Dan Arp, complained he was struck in the back by an angry supporter. The man was detained by police, but later released without charges.

Tennessee

On Tuesday, a medical marijuana bill won a committee vote. The House Health Subcommittee unanimously approved a bill sponsored by Rep. Ryan Williams (R-Cookville). The measure, which would not allow for the smoking of marijuana, now goes to the full House Health Committee.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

April 08, 2015

MMJ%20leaf%20and%20stethoscope%20KY%20OD

Key congressmen stuck up for California's dispensaries, an Idaho CBD bill passed, an Indiana CBD bill died, the Arizona Supreme Court allowed parolees to use medical marijuana, and more.

National

Last Thursday, two key congressmen rejected DOJ claims it can still prosecute California dispensaries. Reps. Sam Farr (D-CA) and Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), authors of the successful congressional budget amendment protecting medical marijuana in states where it is legal, have rejected Justice Department claims that it can still go after dispensaries in California. "The Justice Department’s interpretation of the amendment defies logic," Farr said. "No reasonable person thinks prosecuting patients doesn’t interfere with a state’s medical marijuana laws. Lawyers can try to mince words but Congress was clear: Stop going after patients and dispensaries." A Rohrabacher spokesman added that "the congressman believes the amendment's language is perfectly clear and that the DOJ's self-referential interpretation is emphatically wrong."

Alabama

Last Wednesday, a full-blown medical marijuana bill was filed. Sen. Bobby Singleton (D-Greensboro) filed Senate Bill 326, which would allow doctors to recommend medical marijuana to patients and which has a unique scheme setting three levels of allowable amounts possessed. The bill would allow one dispensary in cities with a population of 10,000 or more and two dispensaries in cities with a population of 150,000 or more. Companion legislation is expected to be filed in the House by Rep. John Rogers (D-Birmingham).

Arizona

On Tuesday, the state Supreme Court ruled that probationers and parolees can use medical marijuana. In two rulings, the state high court barred courts and prosecutors from denying registered patients the right to use medical marijuana while on probation. The cases are Arizona v. Farrell and Reed-Kaliher v. Arizona.

California

Last Tuesday, the Fresno city council approved the indoor cultivation of up to four plants. That's a change from the total ban on cultivation it passed last year. Still, patients expressed reservations about whether four plants would be sufficient. The council must approve the measure one more time before it becomes law.

Last Friday, a Yuba County judge denied a temporary restraining order against the county sought by medical marijuana growers. The Yuba Patients Coalition and six growers had sought to undo an "urgency" designation with the county's cultivation ordinance that eliminated a period for signature-gathering for a referendum challenging the ordinance. The growers said they will appeal.

On Tuesday, the State Water Board issued best practice guidelines for marijuana cultivation. The effort includes a "Know Before You Grow" brochures and a "Pesticide Use on Marijuana" research paper. Click on the link for much more.

Connecticut

On Monday, a legislative committee approved expanding the medical marijuana program.The committee endorsed Senate Bill 1064 after lengthy debate. The bill would be a significant expansion of the state's medical marijuana system and would allow children with specified diseases to participate, but they wold be limited to using low-THC, high-CBD cannabis oils. The bill now goes to the full Senate for consideration.

Florida

Last Friday, the state's CBD implementation bill faced more problems. A bill trying to get the state's CBD cannabis oil law, passed last year, actually implemented is now facing a new challenge: how to give black farmers a fair shot at growing the new crop. The existing law only allows farms that have been in existence for at least 30 years and that grow 400,000 plants or more to apply for one of five licenses to cultivate and distribute the crop. But hundreds of black farmers say they are being cut out of the deal because 30 years ago, they were still fighting with the US Department of Agriculture over discriminatory lending practices and weren't yet in business. The sponsor of both last year's successful bill and this year's implementation bill, Sen. Rob Bradley (R-Fleming Island), said he would attempt to address the issue. The bill is Senate Bill 7066.

Idaho

Last Monday, the CBD cannabis oil bill came back from the dead. The bill, Senate Bill 1146, was killed on a tie vote in the House State Affairs Committee Monday, but the committee has agreed to reconsider it and was set to meet today for further discussion on it. If it passes the committee, it could go to a House floor vote tomorrow.

Last Thursday, it passed the Senate. The bill was killed in committee on Monday, but brought back to life Thursday and passed the Senate today. Senate Bill 1146would allow for the use of CBD for "intractable seizure disorder." It won the support of all seven Democratic state senators and 15 of 27 Republican state senators.

Last Friday, it passed the House. A bill that appeared dead only a week ago has now passed both houses of the legislature and heads for the desk of Gov. Butch Otter ®. The bill is Senate Bill 1146.

Illinois

On Monday, officials began pondering whether to add 14 new qualifying conditions. The state Medical Cannabis Advisory Board is now reviewing 22 petitions requesting the addition of some 14 diseases or medical conditions to the list of those that qualify for medical marijuana. The board will hold a hearing in May and then make recommendations to the director of the Department of Publich Health, who will make the ultimate decision. Click on the link to see the whole list.

Indiana

On Tuesday, a CBD cannabis oil bill was killed. A bill to allow for the use of CBD cannabis oil to treat children with epilepsy sailed through the House earlier this session, but was killed by a Senate committee vote Tuesday after prosecutors opposed it, saying it was similar to legalizing medical marijuana.

Massachusetts

On Wednesday, the state announced it was revamping the application process for dispensaries. The state Department of Public Health (DPH) today announced significant changes to the Commonwealth’s Medical Marijuana Dispensary program first authorized in 2012. The revised process will license Registered Marijuana Dispensaries (RMD) in a format similar to other healthcare facilities, such as pharmacies, which DPH also administers. This process will phase out the current use of state procurement policies to register a dispensary. Click on the link for more details.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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Medical Marijuana Update

by psmith,

April 15, 2015

MMJ%20leaf%20and%20stethoscope%20KY%20OD

There's action on Capitol Hill, Tennessee passes a CBD cananbis oil bill, a Hawaii dispensary bill moves, Washington sends a medical marijuana overhaul bill to the governor, and more.

National

Last Wednesday, the DEA recommended that the government triple the amount of marijuana it grows for research. The DEA recommended that the government produce nearly 900 pounds of marijuana for research this year, more than three times the amount the agency had estimated it would need. The increase is because of "unanticipated medical, scientific, research, and industrial needs of the United States," the agency said in a notice published in the Federal Register.

On Monday, came notice of the 9th Annual Clinical Cannabis Conference Next Month in Florida. The medical marijuana advocacy group Patients Out of Time is hosting this premier event. Click on the link for all the details and registration information.

On Tuesday, a federal bill to allow children access to medical marijuana was filed. Reps. Morgan Griffith (R-VA) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) Tuesday filed the Compassionate Access Act, which would "allow the states to provide appropriate access to patients needing these legitimate, medical treatments under the supervision of their physician," the congressmen said in a statement. The bill is not yet available on the congressional website.

As of Tuesday, a federal medical marijuana bill had picked up new supporters. The CARERS Act, HR 1538, which would end federal interference in states with medical marijuana laws, has picked up new sponsors over the recess. The latest are Reps. Justin Amash (R-MI), Donald Beyer (D-VA), Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), and Joseph Heck (R-NV). The bill now has 12 cosponsors, evenly divided among Democrats and Republicans. Click the link for more bill information.

As of Tuesday, a federal CBD cannabis oil bill had picked up new sponsors. The Charlotte's Web Medical Access Act, HR 1635, which would remove cannabidiol (CBD) and CBD-rich marijuana plants from the Controlled Substances Act, has picked up new cosponsors. The latest are Reps. Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Mick Mulvaney (R-SC). The bill now has 20 cosponsors, evenly divided among Democrats and Republicans. Click on the link for more bill information.

9th Annual Clinical Cannabis Conference Next Month in Florida. The medical marijuana advocacy group Patients Out of Time is hosting this premier event. Click on the link for all the details and registration information.

California

Last Thursday, the Los Angeles city attorney said 500 unpermitted dispensaries had been shut down. City Attorney Mike Feuer said Thursday that his office has closed down 500 unpermitted dispensaries since the city voted two years ago to cap their number at about 130. But he conceded that hundreds more still operate.

Colorado

Last Thursday, a bill to allow parolees and probationers use medical marijuana advanced. The House Judiciary Committee unanimously approved a bill that would allow people on probation or parole use medical marijuana. The change wouldn't apply, however, to people whose crimes were related to marijuana. The measure is House Bill 1267.

Florida

On Monday, a CBD cannabis oil regulation bill won a committee vote. The bill, Senate Bill 7066, would expand the number of businesses that could participate from five to 20. It was approved by the Senate Rules Committee, but without addressing complaints from black farmers that they had been shut out of the process. It now goes to the Senate floor.

Hawaii

On Tuesday, the Senate approved a dispensary bill. The bill that would establish a system of medical dispensaries for the state's 13,000 medical marijuana patients. The measure is House Bill 321. The bill now has to go back to the House for reconciliation.

Iowa

On Wednesday, the Senate approved a medical marijuana expansion bill. The Senate voted to approve Senate File 484, which allow the production and distribution of medical marijuana. The bill would allow for up to a dozen independent dispensaries. It now goes to the House.

Tennessee

Last week, a medical marijuana bill died in the legislature. Both the Senate Health and Welfare Committee and the House Health Committee voted to kill pending medical marijuana bills. Both committees, however, agreed to create summer study committees to look at the legislation.

On Monday, the legislature approved a CBD cannabis oil bill. Both the House and the Senate unanimously approved a bill to allow the use of CBD cannabis oil for the treatment of seizures in children. House Bill 197 now awaits the signatures of Gov. Bill Haslam ®.

Washington

On Tuesday, the legislature approved an overhaul of the medical marijuana system. A bill that seeks to end unregulated medical marijuana dispensary sales and fold medical marijuana into the recreational marijuana system is now headed for the desk of Gov. Jay Inslee (D). Senate Bill 5052 would create a database of patients (voluntary, but patients won't get tax-free medicine unless they sign up), allow patients to possess three times more marijuana than recreational users, and eliminate the current collective garden structure, replacing it with cooperatives limited to four patients.

[For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.]

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