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20's and earlier thread


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#1 davidmalmolevine

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 05:42 AM



At 43 into this vid you can see the 1928 Mickey Mouse smoke a mexican cone-shaped cigarette - then he drinks a beer and starts dancing with Minnie ... I think there is an argument to be made that this is marihuana ... worth a look with an open mind.

See also:

http://www.hecklersp...en/20079381.php

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#2 kingAmongKings

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 06:03 AM

I think you are could make a strong argument that it's marijuana, considering the mexican stereotypes of the era. Seeing as how it's B&W we can't see his red eyes unfortunately.




Mickey Mouse - The Gallopin' Gaucho - 1928

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#3 kingAmongKings

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 12:48 PM



(1924) Notch Number One AKA: High on the Range

Love, death and "marihuana" highlight this 1924 western melodrama, set in the late 19th century at the fictional Moore Ranch. Tom Watson, the rugged foreman at the Moore Ranch, is an affable friend to all, especially Dave Leonard, fiancée to Dorothy, the young daughter of Tom's boss. Dave Leonard is also a friend to the unfortunate Pete, a ranch hand recently fired by Tom. Distraught over the firing, Pete smokes marihuana -- loco weed -- and gives some to Dave, who is driven violent by the weed. Pete, also violent from the demon weed, seeks revenge against Tom for his firing. However, Dorothy intervenes, and is shot dead by Pete in the process. Source

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#4 kingAmongKings

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 01:10 PM



(1927) Ernest Rogers - Willie the Chimney Sweeper

"Recorded in 1927. This same tune was recorded at about the same time by Frankie "Half Pint" Jaxon, well known at the time for his tunes full of innuendo (not to mention his parallel career as a female impersonator), as "Willie The Weeper." These tunes may be the earliest known "reefer" tunes in American popular culture (with the exception of "La Cucaracha"). The references to "smoking pills" in these "Willie" tunes isn't that strange when it is taken into consideration that drug vernacular at the time referred to balls of opium as "pills." Ernest Rodgers was a "citybilly" type who also was an established journalist in Atlanta."Source

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#5 kingAmongKings

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 02:55 PM



"La Cucaracha" (Spanish: "The Cockroach") is a traditional Spanish folk corrido that became popular in Mexico during the Mexican Revolution (Started in 1910). It has additionally become a verse played on car horns.

The origins of "La Cucaracha" are obscure, with some versions of the lyrics discussing events that took place during the conclusion of the Granada War in 1492 (see section below).

Pre Mexican Revolution lyrics

The most traditional Spanish version is as follows:

Spanish
La cucaracha, la cucaracha,
ya no puede caminar
porque no tiene, porque le falta
las dos patitas de atrás.

English
The cockroach, the cockroach,
can't walk anymore
because it doesn't have, because it's lacking
its two back feet.

Revolutionary lyrics

The Mexican Revolution was a period of great political upheaval during which the majority of the stanzas known today were written. Political symbolism was a common theme in these verses, and explicit and implicit references were made to events of the war, major political figures, and the effects of the war on the civilians in general. Today, few pre-Revolution verses are known, and the most commonly quoted portion of the song[3] is the two Villist anti-Huerta[4] stanzas:

Spanish

La cucaracha, la cucaracha,
ya no puede caminar
porque no tiene, porque le falta
marihuana pa' fumar.

English

The cockroach, the cockroach,
can't walk anymore
because it doesn't have, because it's lacking
marijuana to smoke.

Source: Wikipedia

Examples:



Speedy Gonzalez - La Cucaracha
Slow Poke Rodriguez - La Cucaracha
Liberace - La Cucarache
LA CUCARACHA - REVOLUCIÓN MEXICANA
Ignacio Lopez Tarso - Gabino Barrera (Version Original)
Unknown - La Cucaracha
(1964) Skatalites - Ska-Racha
Xavier Cugat - La Cucaracha
Kumbia Kings - La Cucaracha

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#6 davidmalmolevine

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Posted 24 October 2010 - 05:06 PM

NICE fucking job.

I especially liked the Speedy Gonzales clip ... I remember watching all of those as a kid but never remembered a marijuana reference!

Awesome research!

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#7 kingAmongKings

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 04:46 AM

(1972) The Consumers Union Report on Licit and Illicit Drugs
by Edward M. Brecher and the Editors of Consumer Reports Magazine

Chapter 55 - Marijuana and Alcohol Prohibition

It was a change in the laws rather than a change in the drug or in human nature that stimulated the large-scale marketing of marijuana for recreational use in the United States. Not until the Eighteenth Amendment and the Volstead Act of 1920 raised the price of alcoholic beverages and made them less convenient to secure and inferior in quality did a substantial commercial trade in marijuana for recreational use spring up.

Evidence for such a trade comes from New York City, where marijuana "tea pads" were established about 1920. They resembled opium dens or speakeasies except that prices were very low; a man could get high for a quarter on marijuana smoked in the pad, or for even less if he bought the marijuana at the door and took it away to smoke. Most of the marijuana, it was said, was harvested from supplies growing wild on Staten Island or in New Jersey and other nearby states; marijuana and hashish imported from North Africa were more potent and cost more. These tea pads were tolerated by the city, much as alcohol speakeasies were tolerated. By the 1930s there were said to be 500 of them in New York City alone. 1

In 1926 the New Orleans Item and Morning Tribune, two newspapers under common ownership, published highly sensational exposés of the "menace" of marijuana. 2 They reported that it was coming into New Orleans from Havana, Tampico, and Vera Cruz in large quantities, plus smaller amounts from Texas. "In one day, ten sailors were followed from the time they left their ships until they delivered their respective packages of the drug to a particular block in the Vieux Carre." 3 The sailors, it was said, bought marijuana in the Mexican ports for $10 or $12 per kilogram (2.2 pounds) and sold it in the Vieux Carré for $35 to $50. 4 This was far more profitable than smuggling a comparable weight of whiskey.

Much of the smuggled marijuana was smoked in New Orleans; but some, it was said, was shipped–– up the Mississippi and "found its way as far north as Cleveland, Ohio, where a well-known physician said it was smoked in one of the exclusive men's clubs." 5

In New Orleans, the reporters in 1926 laid particular stress on the smoking of marijuana by children. "It was definitely ascertained that school children of 44 schools (only a few of these were high schools) were smoking 'mootas.' Verifications came in by the hundreds from harassed parents, teachers, neighborhood pastors, priests, welfare workers and club women.... The Waif's Home, at this time, was reputedly full of children, both white and colored, who had been brought in under the influence of the drug. Marijuana cigarettes could be bought almost as readily as sandwiches. Their cost was two for a quarter. The children solved the problem of cost by pooling pennies among the members of a group and then passing the cigarettes from one to another, all the puffs being carefully counted." 6

A Louisiana law passed in 1927, after the newspaper exposé, provided a maximum penalty of a $500 fine or six months' imprisonment for possession or sale of marijuana. * 7 There followed "a wholesale arrest of more than 150 persons. Approximately one hundred underworld dives, soft drink establishments, night clubs, grocery stores, and private homes were searched in the police raids. Addicts, hardened criminals, gangsters, women of the streets, sailors of all nationalities, bootleggers, boys and girls–– many flashily dressed in silks and furs, others in working clothes all were rounded up in the net which Captain Smith and his squad had set." 8

* The penalties were later escalated to include thirty years at hard labor or the death sentence for sale of marijuana to anyone under twenty-one years of age (first offense). We have found no record, however, of the actual imposition of the death sentence in a United States marijuana case.

The newspaper investigation, the new law, and the heavily publicized police roundups did not, however, accomplish their purpose. On the contrary, according to Commissioner of Public Safety Frank Gomila, during the next few years New Orleans "experienced a crime wave which unquestionably was greatly aggravated by the influence of this drug habit. Payroll and bank guards were doubled, but this did not prevent some of the most spectacular hold-ups in the history of the city. Youngsters known to be 'muggle-heads' fortified themselves with the narcotic and proceeded to shoot down police, bank clerks and casual bystanders. Mr. Eugene Stanley, at that time District Attorney, declared that many of the crimes in New Orleans and the South were thus committed by criminals who relied on the drug to give them a false courage and freedom from restraint. Dr. George Roeling, Coroner, reported that of 450 prisoners investigated, 125 were confirmed users of marihuana. Mr. W. B. Graham, State Narcotic Officer, declared in 1936 that 60 percent of the crimes committed in New Orleans were by marihuana users." 9

Intensive patrolling of the New Orleans harbor tended to curb imports; but Louisianans were little inconvenienced by the smuggling curbs; they simply began to grow their own marijuana. "The first large growing crop in the city was found in 1930 and its value estimated at $35,000 to $50,000.... In 1936 about 1,200 pounds of bulk weed were seized along with considerable quantities of cigarettes. On one farm, 5-1/2 tons were destroyed and other farms yielded cultivated areas of about 10 acres....

One resident of the city was found growing 100 large plants in his backyard." 10 The net effect of eleven years of vigorous law enforcement was summed up by Commissioner Gomila in 1938: "Cigarettes are hard to get and are selling at 30 to 40 cents apiece, which is a relatively high price and a particularly good indication of the effectiveness of the present control." 11 Marijuana smoking, in short, had become endemic in New Orleans–– and remains endemic today. What years of law enforcement had accomplished was to raise the price from two for 25 cents to 30 cents or 40 cents apiece–– and even this increase might be attributable in part to inflation.

In Colorado, the Denver News launched a similar series of sensational marijuana exposés following the pattern set in New Orleans. 12 Mexican laborers imported to till the Colorado beet-sugar fields, it seems, had found Prohibition alcohol very expensive and so had resorted instead to marijuana, bringing their supplies north with them. A Colorado law against marijuana was duly passed in 1929. 13

These sensational newspaper accounts and early efforts to outlaw marijuana should not, however, be taken as evidence that marijuana smoking was in fact widespread. In 1931 the United States Treasury Department, then responsible for enforcing both the federal antinarcotics and the federal antialcohol laws, indicated that the marijuana exposés in the newspapers were quite possibly exaggerated:

A great deal of public interest has been aroused by newspaper articles appearing from time to time on the evils of the abuse of marihuana, or Indian hemp, and more attention has been focused on specific cases reported of the abuse of the drug than would otherwise have been the case. This publicity tends to magnify the extent of the evil and lends color to an inference that there is an alarming spread of the improper use of the drug, whereas the actual increase in such use may not have been inordinately large. 14


Footnotes
Chapter 55

1. Mayor's Committee on Marijuana, "The Marijuana Problem in the City of New York," (1944), in The Marijuana Papers, ed. David Solomon (New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1966), p. 246.

2. See New Orleans Morning Tribune, October 17, 19-23, 28, 1926; and New Orleans Item, October 22, 1926; February 4, 1927.

3. Robert F. Walton, Marijuana, America's New Drug Problem (Philadelphia: B. Lippincott, 1938), p. 29.

4. Ibid.

5. Ibid., p. 30.

6. Ibid., pp. 30-31.

7. Ibid., Table 1, p. 37.

8. Ibid., p. 31.

9. Ibid.

10. Ibid., p. 32.

11. Ibid.

12. Ibid., p. 3.3.

13. Ibid., Table 1, p. 37.

14. U.S. Treasury Department, Traffic in Opium and Other Dangerous Drugs for the Year Ended December 31, 1931 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1932), p. 51.

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#8 kingAmongKings

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Posted 10 November 2010 - 04:48 AM



(1929) Slim and Slam - Chinatown my Chinatown

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#9 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 November 2010 - 05:04 AM



High Society - Constable S. O. Lawson [1of7]
High Society - Constable S. O. Lawson [2of7]
High Society - Constable S. O. Lawson [3of7]
High Society - Constable S. O. Lawson [4of7]
High Society - Constable S. O. Lawson [5of7]
High Society - Constable S. O. Lawson [6of7]
High Society - Constable S. O. Lawson [7of7]

From the archives of Pot-TV.

Originally released on March 9th, 2005.

In response to 4 Alberta RCMP deaths from investigating a 20 marijuana plant "organized crime" grow-op, DML uncovcers the story of Stephen O. Lawson, an Alberta Provincial Police constable who got shot and killed in 1922 enforcing alcohol prohibition. In 1923, a petition with 51,000 signatures called for an end to the violence caused by alcohol prohibition. Later that year a Provincial plebiscite resulted in the removal of alcohol prohibition. Also included is a few quotes from Penn & Teller, Jesse Ventura, a young Liberal from last week's convention and a slideshow to "Copperhead Road" by Steve Earl - all showing how lots of folks have noticed the connection between one type of prohibition and another. As well, clips from "Rumrunners, Bootleggers and Moonshiners" - a documentary from The History Channel.

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#10 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 November 2010 - 05:20 AM

(2010) Prohibition - Then and Now

The Internet Archive has a fairly large collection of documents on Alcohol Prohibition and the Temperance movement.

Archive.org: Prohibition

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#11 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 November 2010 - 05:24 AM

History Channel - Most Dangerous Drug in American Clip

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#12 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 November 2010 - 05:27 AM



Crime Inc. - Prohibition and the Mafia (1of3)
Crime Inc. - Prohibition and the Mafia (2of3)
Crime Inc. - Prohibition and the Mafia (3of3)

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#13 kingAmongKings

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 05:41 AM







Bootleg Pete

Pete (also known by variations of his name, including Peg-Leg Pete, Black Pete, Big Pete, Bad Pete, Big Bad Pete, Mighty Pete, Bootleg Pete, Mr. Peter Pete, and Pete the Cat) is a cartoon character from the Walt Disney Company studios. He is an anthropomorphic cat (since 1928; earlier drawn as a bear) and is sometimes depicted with a peg leg, and generally depicted as the archenemy or rival of Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, and Goofy. Though usually associated with the Mickey Mouse universe, Pete appeared in Disney's animated cartoon series Alice Comedies before the first appearance of Mickey Mouse, and is Disney's oldest continuing character. Though Pete is officially a cat, his feline appearance was later subdued. In the TV series Goof Troop, he somewhat resembled a dog like many other characters in the series. Despite being an antagonist in most productions, he is sometimes depicted in a lighter tone making him a minor protagonist or neutral character. He is also shown to be Goofy's best friend or confidante as seen in Goof Troop as well as the film adaptation A Goofy Movie, and its sequel.Source

Pete first appeared in the Walt Disney-produced 1920s "Alice Comedies" short subject series. He first appeared in (1925) Alice Solves a Puzzle (February 15, 1925) as Bootleg Pete. His nickname is a reference to his career of bootlegging alcoholic beverages during the United States Prohibition (January 16, 1920 - December 5, 1933). His activities brought him at a beach in time to see Alice playing with a crossword puzzle. Pete happened to be a collector of crossword puzzles and identified Alice's puzzle being a rare one missing from his collection. The rest of the short focused on his antagonizing Alice and her drunk-on-moonshine cat Julius in order to steal it. The menacing, bear-like villain commanded quite a presence on the screen and was destined to return.Source

The earliest known instance of censorship in animation occurred when the censorship board of Pennsylvania requested that references to bootlegging be removed from Walt Disney's 1925 short Alice Solves a Puzzle.[1]Source

----------------------------

Black Pete and Mickey Mouse are caricatures of african-americans.



Mickey Mouse was originally portrayed as a minstrel character. From 1929 to well into the 1930s the character of Mickey Mouse was understood and openly described as "minstrel".[40] These portrayals can be seen in early depictions such as the original version of "Steamboat Willie",[41] as well as "Mickey's Mellerdrammer", the advertising for which featured Mickey in blackface with pronounced facial features understood to resemble caricatures of African-Americans in the 1930s.[42]Source

Example blackface minstrel

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#14 kingAmongKings

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Posted 20 November 2010 - 06:21 AM




Vin Mariani (French: Mariani's wine) was a tonic and patent medicine created circa 1863 by Angelo Mariani, a chemist who became intrigued with coca and its economic potential after reading Paolo Mantegazza’s paper on coca's effects. In 1863,[1][2] Mariani started marketing a wine called Vin Tonique Mariani (à la Coca du Pérou)[1] which was made from Bordeaux wine treated with coca leaves.[3]

The ethanol in the wine acted as a solvent and extracted the cocaine from the coca leaves, altering the drink’s effect. It originally contained 6 mg of cocaine per fluid ounce of wine, but Vin Mariani which was to be exported contained 7.2 mg per ounce in order to compete with the higher cocaine content of similar drinks in the United States. Ads for Vin Mariani claimed that it would restore health, strength, energy, and vitality.Source



When launched (1886) Coca-Cola's two key ingredients were cocaine (benzoylmethyl ecgonine) and caffeine. The cocaine was derived from the coca leaf and the caffeine from kola nut, leading to the name Coca-Cola (the "K" in Kola was replaced with a "C" for marketing purposes).[28][29]
Coca — cocaine

Pemberton called for five ounces of coca leaf per gallon of syrup, a significant dose; in 1891, Candler claimed his formula (altered extensively from Pemberton's original) contained only a tenth of this amount. Coca-Cola did once contain an estimated nine milligrams of cocaine per glass, but in 1903 it was removed.[30] Coca-Cola still contains coca flavoring.

After 1904, instead of using fresh leaves, Coca-Cola started using "spent" leaves — the leftovers of the cocaine-extraction process with cocaine trace levels left over at a molecular level.[31] To this day, Coca-Cola uses as an ingredient a cocaine-free coca leaf extract prepared at a Stepan Company plant in Maywood, New Jersey.

In the United States, Stepan Company is the only manufacturing plant authorized by the Federal Government to import and process the coca plant,[32] which it obtains mainly from Peru and, to a lesser extent, Bolivia. Besides producing the coca flavoring agent for Coca-Cola, Stepan Company extracts cocaine from the coca leaves, which it sells to Mallinckrodt, a St. Louis, Missouri pharmaceutical manufacturer that is the only company in the United States licensed to purify cocaine for medicinal use.[33]Source



7 Up was created by Charles Leiper Grigg, who launched his St. Louis-based company The Howdy Corporation in 1920.[1] Grigg came up with the formula for a lemon-lime soft drink in 1929. The product, originally named "Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda", was launched two weeks before the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[2] It contained lithium citrate, a mood-stabilizing drug. It was one of a number of patent medicine products popular in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Specifically it was marketed as a hangover cure.Source

The Hangover Cure, Lithium citrate was removed from 7 Up's formula in 1950.Anyone have a better source?



History Channel - Vin Mariana and Coca-Cola

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#15 kingAmongKings

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Posted 20 November 2010 - 06:43 AM

History Channel - Hooked - Illegal Drugs and How they Got that Way - Marijuana [1of5]Pre-1920
History Channel - Hooked - Illegal Drugs and How they Got that Way - Marijuana [2of5]Post-1920
History Channel - Hooked - Illegal Drugs and How they Got that Way - Marijuana [3of5]
History Channel - Hooked - Illegal Drugs and How they Got that Way - Marijuana [4of5]
History Channel - Hooked - Illegal Drugs and How they Got that Way - Marijuana [5of5]

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#16 kingAmongKings

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Posted 21 November 2010 - 05:12 AM

(1894) Chinese Opium Den

Chinese Opium Den (also known as Opium Joint) is an 1894 American short black-and-white silent film. It is an early motion picture produced by Thomas Edison.

Very little is known about this film as no print is believed to exist and all that remains is a single still image. It is believed to be the first motion picture to explore the issue of substance abuse. Ten years later Edison produced Rube in an Opium Joint, which is seen as the earliest surviving film depicting drug use. [1]

According to the Internet Movie Database the film was made in a 35mm film format with an aspect ratio of 1.33:1. The movie was intended to be displayed through means of a Kinetoscope. [2]Source

(1904) Reuben in the Opium Den

A hick tourist visits an opium den and has to be shown the proper way to smoke opium, after initially trying to use the pipe as if it were a flute. Source

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#17 kingAmongKings

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Posted 21 November 2010 - 05:13 AM

(1914) San Fransisco Gov't burns confiscated opium and other chinese drugs.

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#18 davidmalmolevine

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Posted 23 November 2010 - 05:18 AM

"Lithium" not directly mentioned on the official history page:

http://www.7up.com/page/about/

This page is a bit more interesting but still does not specify the date the lithium was removed:

http://www.snopes.co...s/names/7up.asp

Like cocaine, lithium is now a highly controlled drug available only by prescription:

"Take lithium exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label."

http://www.drugs.com/lithium.html

Pepsi was first introduced as "Brad's Drink" in New Bern, North Carolina, in 1883 by Caleb Bradham, who made it at his pharmacy where the drink was sold. It was later named Pepsi Cola, possibly due to the digestive enzyme pepsin and kola nuts used in the recipe.[1] Bradham sought to create a fountain drink that was delicious and would aid in digestion and boost energy.[2]

http://en.wikipedia....i/Pepsi#History

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepsin

http://www.bottlebooks.com/questions/common/Caldwell%27s%20Syrup%20of%20Pepsin.htm


Isn't it interesting that some of the most popular soft drinks of today originally contained the drugs cocaine, lithium and pepsin in them? All three drugs were considered at one time medicines, and now one is considered too dangerous for prescription, one is by prescription only and one is non-prescription. Fascinating stuff.

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#19 kingAmongKings

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 03:08 AM



(1922) The pharmacopoeia of Japan
(1916) The Pharmacopoeia of the United States of America
Do a search for the cannabis keyword in the books.


Other pharmacopoeias held by archive.org

Pharmacopoeia, in its modern technical sense, is a book containing directions for the identification of samples and the preparation of compound medicines, and published by the authority of a government or a medical or pharmaceutical society.

In a broader sense it is a reference work for pharmaceutical drug specifications.Source

The name has also been applied to similar compendia issued by private individuals

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#20 kingAmongKings

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 07:08 AM



(1922) The Black Candle by Emily Murphy

Cannabis was added to the Confidential Restricted List in 1923. Historians usually point to the 1922 publication of Emily Murphy’s The Black Candle as the inspiration for the addition. Murphy was a suffragist and police magistrate who wrote a series of articles in Maclean’s magazine under the pen-name “Janey Canuck,” which formed the basis of her book. She uses numerous anecdotes culled mostly from anti-drug reformers and police to make her arguments, which make strong links between drugs and race and the threat this poses to white women. One chapter is entitled Marahuana – A New Menace, and makes the claim that the only ways out of cannabis addiction are insanity, death, or abandonment.Source




Wikipedia: Emily Murphy

She was a leading women's rights figure, a racist and a eugenicist that supported forced sterilization. She is mostly remembered and celebrated for her role in advancing women's rights.

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