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Nineties Cannabis Culture Thread


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#121 kingAmongKings

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 06:23 AM



(2001) Bully

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#122 kingAmongKings

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 06:35 AM



(2001) Killer Bud

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#123 kingAmongKings

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Posted 06 March 2010 - 06:36 AM

Source for a lot of these films.

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#124 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:05 AM



(2001) Blow

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#125 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:08 AM



(2001) Lammbock

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#126 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:12 AM



(2001) Prozac Nation

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#127 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:14 AM



(2001) The Royal Tenenbaums

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#128 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:17 AM



(2001) Training Day

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#129 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:21 AM



(2002) 24 Hour Party People

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#130 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 06:37 AM



The Cannabis Buyers Club was the first public medical marijuana dispensary. It opened in February 1994 at 194 Church Street in San Francisco, California, founded by Proposition 215 coauthors "Brownie Mary" Rathburn, Dennis Peron, Dale Gieringer, with Beth Moore, John Entwhistle, Jason Patrick Menard, Gerry Leatherman, Dr. Tod H. Mikuriya. The club, prior to being legalized under California law, was at Ford and Sanchez Street in San Francisco, 1993. Still subject to legal hassles after that date, it eventually changed its name to "Cannabis Cultivators Club" and even "Cannabis Heating Club".Source



(1995) CC03 - Cannabis Buyers' Club Flourishes in 'Frisco

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#131 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 07:49 AM


Picture from 307 West Hastings

(1996) CBC - Big Life - Marc Emery

Hemp B.C. and the Wall Street Journal

In 1995, Hemp B.C. was located at 324 West Hastings across the street from its current location. It very much separates the business sector and the homeless sector.source

It is here that it has generated millions of dollars over the last two years selling marijuana paraphernalia , books, hemp clothing, and hundreds of thousands of seeds ready to be grown. It grossed 2.2 million in 1995, and Emery boasted to improve on that in the following year. It made its millions quietly until a front page article in the Wall Street Journal gave it international exposure. Commenting on the store's financial success and somewhat surprised by the tolerance local authorities have shown the establishment, the article generated a flurry of media attention. TV's 60 Minutes came for a prospectus, and articles appeared in everything from the National Enquirer to the London Sunday Times to the Asian Wall Street Journal.source

In December 1995, Emery and his seed business were featured on the front page of the Wall Street Journal,[29] leading to a deluge of media attention.[30] One month later, in January 1996, Hemp BC was raided by Vancouver police who seized Emery's bongs and seeds and charged him with selling marijuana seeds and "promoting vaporizers." He was later convicted and given a $2200 fine, $500 for each of four counts of selling marijuana seeds and $200 for vaporizer promotion.[31]

Emery re-opened his store the next day, and continued to sell paraphernalia and marijuana seeds. By 1997 he had expanded his store to include a Grow Shop, a Legal Assistance Centre, and the Cannabis Cafe, which featured a custom-built vaporizer built into every table.[32][33]Source



(1996) CC04 - Table of Contents

-Hemp BC's First Raid
-BC gets 3rd at the Cannabis Cup
-What you should know about Bill C-8
-Tim Leary's 75th Birthday Bash
-Drug Policy Foundation
-Dr Goodbud & Norm share grow tips.



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#132 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 09:26 AM



Marc Emery, CNN Impact and the Prince of Pot Label

(1997) CNN Impact - Canada Cannabis [1]
(1997) CNN Impact - Canada Cannabis [2]

On October 12, 1997, Marc Emery was featured on CNN Impact in an episode called "Canada Cannabis."[34] The announcer referred to Emery as the "Prince of Pot" and the label stuck.[35] This drew major international media attention to Emery and his Hemp BC store once more.

The Vancouver police returned on December 16, 1997, once again emptying his store of seeds and paraphernalia, as well as taking the vaporizers out of the Cannabis Cafe. Police claimed to have seized about $l.6 million worth of marijuana-related merchandise, plus tens of thousands of marijuana seeds.[36]

Emery was jailed but not charged with any seed or paraphernalia offences[37] but he was charged and convicted of "assaulting a police officer" because he spat on a police officer while they were forcibly removing protestors from in front of the store. In a later interview, Emery stated "I was found guilty and fined two hundred dollars. My defence was that it was justifiable as they were assaulting my employees. We have video tape of them kicking, shoving objects at, using a truncheon, and pulling on the hair of David Malmo-Levine and Ian Roberts. I wanted to show my disgust in a non-violent way, and to draw the police toward me and away from my employees."[38]

Emery was also banned from returning to the 300 block of West Hastings, where his businesses were located.[39]

Emery re-opened Hemp BC the next day[40] but then sold the store to his manager shortly thereafter, who suffered repeated raids during 1998[41] and then had her business license revoked by the city.[42][43][44]Source

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#133 davidmalmolevine

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 03:08 PM



The Goats - Wake n Bake

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"making the earth a common treasury for all, both rich and poor." Gerrard Winstanley; April 20, 1649

#134 kingAmongKings

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Posted 07 March 2010 - 04:43 PM



(1994) The Goats - No Goats No Glory [album]

(1994) The Goats - Wake and Bake
(1994) The Goats - Philly Blunts


The Goats were an alternative hip-hop quartet from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Their members included rappers Oatie Kato (the frontman), Madd (a.k.a. "the M-A-the-double-D", a.k.a. Maxx), and Swayzack. Madd and Swayzack are Aboriginal Americans, and their concern with Aboriginal causes is reflected in their lyrics.

The Goats held that Christopher Columbus was responsible for genocidal crimes against the Aboriginal inhabitants of pre-colonial America, including the rape of innocent women by his crew. Their fury was expressed in the signature song, "Tricks of the Shade", which contains the lyrics, "Columbus killed more Indians than Hitler killed Jews; but on his birthday you get sales on shoes."

The Goats were artists on Columbia Records / Ruffhouse Records.

They developed a large cult following after the release of two well-respected albums, Tricks Of The Shade (1992) (produced by producer Joe "the Butcher" Nicolo) and No Goats No Glory (1994), on Ruffhouse Records and Columbia Records respectively; both are presently out of print, used copies circulate online and second-hand record shops.Source

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#135 kingAmongKings

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 01:56 PM



(2002) High Society - Pot and Performance [1of2]
(2002) High Society - Pot and Performance [2of2]

(2010, January 28th) CBC - Q TV - Olympic Gold Medallist Ross Rebagliati

(1998) CBC - Nagano: Ross Rebagliati


Ross Rebagliati does Cannabis Canadians proud.

Ross Rebagliati, Cannabis Hero!
If you haven't heard of Ross Rebagliati you must have been buried under an avalanche. The gold medal winner in the first ever Olympic snowboarding competition, Rebagliati is a long-standing member of British Columbia's legendary cannabis community. Rebagliati has been called everything from "hero" to "pot head", and to many Canadians, he is both.

Rebagliati's gold medal was threatened by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) for trace levels of marijuana found in his system during routine post-competition urine tests. The ensuing controversy brought out sympathy for the rogue slope-slider from unexpected quarters. Many once hard-line anti-pot people were heard to be muttering "Just give him the medal, it's only pot!"

For more see: Source of Text: (1998) CC12



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#136 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:12 AM



(1995) CC0 - An Analysis of Bill C-7 - Dana Larsen

What would C-7 Have done?

The government officials also testified as to the differences between the proposed Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and the present legislation. Although there are a number of changes proposed in the legislation, there are at least four which deserve greater attention.

First, Bill C-7 widens the scope of controlled substances so that anything which has an effect similar to or greater than a controlled substance automatically becomes a controlled substance as well. This is supposed to be a means of controlling look-alike drugs and new designer drugs that may be invented.

Second, the section on offense-related property has been widened so that property used to commit crimes will be seizable and forfeitable as well. The potential for abuse with this aspect of the legislation seems obvious, yet it was not pursued by any of the sub-committee members.

Third, the terms "manufacture" and "cultivation" have been unified into a single term: "production" and now applies uniformly to all substances. Under the Narcotic Control Act it is not illegal to cultivate psilocybin mushrooms or a coca bush, but growing either of these plants would be prohibited under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. This could possibly result in a farmer who unknowingly has psilocybin mushrooms growing on his property being charged with their production.

Finally, the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act creates a hybrid trafficking offense so that trafficking in under three kilograms of cannabis can be dealt with either as summary conviction or indictment. Presently, possession of cannabis is a hybrid offense, but a trafficking charge can only be pursued through indictment. With indictment, there has to be a preliminary inquiry and the accused has the right to demand a jury trial. A summary conviction requires no preliminary inquiry and there is no option for a jury.

There is already a tendency on the part of federal prosecutors to press for a possession charge instead of a trafficking charge when the amount of cannabis in question is not a great one. With the option of a quick summary conviction before them instead, this change will result in more people being prosecuted for trafficking when they are only in possession of a small amount. Thus under Bill C-7 more people will be given quicker trials and more jail time than before. more

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#137 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:18 AM



(1996) CC4 - Bill C-7 - Dana Larsen

Bill C-7 is almost exactly the same as Bill C-85, which was introduced by the Conservative government of Kim Campbell, but was not passed before they were defeated by the Liberal government of Jean Chretien.

Bill C-7 has been a strange affair from beginning to end. What other piece of legislation can claim to having survived a change in government and condemnation from almost every group that testified about it, only to be discreetly passed, without significant changes, when the official opposition is absent, as the last act of Parliament on the day of a possibly nation-breaking referendum?


"The most controversial aspect of Bill C-7 was Clause 3, which considered anything that had an effect similar to that of a substance already listed in the bill as being punishable as if it was that substance."

There was no debate in Parliament as to the constitutionality of the search and seizure aspects of the bill, despite the fact that they remain unchanged from those that were so heavily criticized by the Quebec Bar Association during testimony on Bill C-7 last summer.

No member of parliament addressed the medical use of marijuana, despite the fact that marijuana has a wide variety of medicinal uses, and even the USA has a dozen citizens who receive medical marijuana from their government.

Although more than one MP commented on the fact that Bill C-7 makes no provision for the decriminalization of marijuana, there was no vigorous attack on the government's continued prohibition of the herb. Nor was there any comment upon the dangers of "streamlining" the judicial process to allow for "fast tracking" of marijuana cases.

Bill C-7 Today From an insert in CC4 which had already been printed on February 2nd.

On February 2nd [1996], Parliament closed for the current session. This means that Bill C-7, and all other legislation that had not yet been approved into law, has died.

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#138 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:28 AM



What Every Canadian Should Know about Bill C-7

You can find the whole article in CC4. Here are the Highlights.

Bill C-7 does not reduce the penalties for possession of Marijuana.

Bill C-7 drastically increases police powers of search and seizure.

Bill C-7 will "streamline" the justice system to allow for more trafficking charges to be laid.

Bill C-7 prohibites all medical use of marijuana.

Bill C-7 doesn't allow the cultivation of cannabis hemp.

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#139 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 07:34 AM



(1998) Around the Fire

Source for Date

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#140 kingAmongKings

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 08:25 AM



CBC - Chris Clay - Stoned [1of5]
CBC - Chris Clay - Stoned [2of5]
CBC - Chris Clay - Stoned [3of5]
CBC - Chris Clay - Stoned [4of5]
CBC - Chris Clay - Stoned [5of5]



(1998) CC11 - Drug Laws Go Bust Excellent article discussing the cannabian culture's legal troubles around 1998. Tons of info.

McCart's ruling against Chris Clay, Judge Howard's decisions against Randy Caine and the ruling against Nycki Temple ? all involve the assumption that the courts cannot overturn unconstitutional laws, that such decisions are the sole jurisdiction of parliament.

In a recent ruling by the Supreme Court of Canada, however, Judge Iacobucci ordered all Canadian Courts to take responsibility for addressing unconstitutional laws, and to stop passing the buck to parliament. His ruling came in relation to laws violating the human rights of lesbians and gays in Alberta.

Those who claim that parliament is solely responsible for changing law, wrote Judge Iacobucci, "misunderstand what transpired when the Charter was passed by Parliament and the provinces in 1982, ?commanding' judges to invalidate unconstitutional laws? The courts are to uphold the Constitution and have been expressly invited to perform that role by the Constitution."

Judge Iacobucci described the relationship between the courts and parliament as a "dialogue", in which the courts speak to parliament by invalidating unconstitutional laws, and the parliament speaks to the courts by passing new legislation.


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