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Cannabis Culture's Misconceptions about Buddhism


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#1 Nathyn

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 08:14 PM

I am a Buddhist and occasionally smoke marijuana recreationally. The Cannabis Culture website and magazine contain a number of incorrect and even offensive assertions about Buddhism because they seem to rely largely on stereotypes of Buddhists and quackery, like the book "The Secret Drugs of Buddhism" by self-published author, Mike Crowley.

What disturbed me the most was an article which cited haikus by Basho and Kobayashi that clearly aren't even haikus because they aren't in haiku form.

I e-mailed their editor-in-chief about this, but in the meantime, I thought I would make a post on their forum as well with the same information.

The following claims are false.
Claim #1. "All Buddhists meditate."
http://cannabiscultu...icles/4188.html

Response: Most Buddhists encourage meditation, but not all practice it. Some sects consider meditation to be of minor importance.

Claim #2. Buddhists have never engaged in violence, for religious-reasons.
(Same source as above)

See medieval Tibet, imperial Japan, and modern-day Bhutan. Buddhism has been just like any other religion.

Claim #3. Buddhism is just about sitting.
(Again, same source as above)

Response: Zen Buddhism focuses heavily on sitting meditation. Not all meditation is sitting, however. Buddhism is about more than zazen and some sects do not practice sitting meditation at all.

Claim #4. Tibetan Buddhists do mushrooms, as part of certain rituals:
http://www.cannabisc...icles/3431.html

Response: It's possible soma may have contained psychadelics, but it's not certain and it isn't used today.

Claim #5. Cannabis is used in a "Hindu-Buddhist" tradition, called Tantra.
http://www.cannabisc...icles/1372.html

Response: Same as #4.

Claim #6. Marijuana has been widely used by Zen poets and Buddhist monks.
http://www.cannabisc...ticles/101.html

Response: This is simply false. The "haikus" you cite in this article aren't in haiku form. They seem to be two pairs of haikus by Basho and Kobayashi that have been savaged by poor translation.

Claim #7. "The Buddhist religion has prophecies which state their religion will last 2,500 years, a period now coming to a close."
http://www.cannabisc...icles/2405.html

Response: This is a Mahayana teaching. Also, I don't believe the "2,500 years" claim is widely held. The most widespread belief is that he will come a few thousand years from now.

Claim #8. According to Mahayana tradition, the Buddha lived on hemp seeds.
http://www.cannabisc...icles/1425.html

Response: Grains of rice, not seeds.

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#2 JodieEmery

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Posted 02 January 2008 - 09:26 PM

Hey Nathan! You just emailed me this message, but since you posted it here I want to reply openly.

The first article you referenced (Claims #1-3) is an interview with Spider Robinson and his wife. Those are quotes from a person's words in an interview, not intended to be taken as absolutely factual Buddhist truth.

 Quote:
J: Yeah, and I went out to the dance studio. It's just that great. One of the things that I've done every year since I've stopped dancing is to go to the Zen monastery. All Buddhists do the same thing: sit. All Buddhists meditate. Buddha said make these teachings work in your own hometown, in your own culture, in your own community. That's why there are over 150 different flavors, but ultimately it's all the same. It's just sitting. We're just sitting with our breaths, and we're just sitting.

S: Here's the thing I love about Buddhism. As far as I can tell (I have examined history), I haven't ever found a Buddhist holy war. Buddha apparently never told people everything will be fine if you'll go kill those infidels in the next valley, the way that Jehovah and Allah and all them other cats seem to do. Buddhists don't do that, they don't fight over Buddhism. If you get a Buddhist really pissed off like back during the Vietnam war, if you really enrage the Buddhist, he sets himself on fire. For a religion, that's pretty civilized, man. And they're careful to do it downwind of anything flammable, so that they don't start a fire. I like that. A religion that peaceful that they've never found a reason to slaughter the heathens or the infidels. Give me some of that.

J: The hippies grabbed on to it. I was living with Stephen Gaskin on The Farm in Tennessee. 1,000 acres, 650 people, every Friday you got given a quarter of an ounce, and so on.




Your second reference (Claim #4) is about the Entheogenesis conference, which had speakers discuss psychedelics and more. The comment about Buddhism is simply a comment about what an author has written.

 Quote:
Author Mike Crowley, who admitted to being a distant relation to Aleister Crowley, blew our minds with the assertion that certain Buddhists used to get high on Amanita muscaria mushrooms as part of a soma initiation, and that perhaps they still do. Crowley traced the use of mushrooms to a tantric Hindu sect that was absorbed into Buddhism, the Vajrayana, or "thunderbolt vehicle" sect – thunderbolts being commonly associated with mushrooms throughout ancient history. Crowley's conference paper also showed that the Tibetan word for cannabis is So.Ma.Ra.Dza, a term which is borrowed directly from the Sanskrit Soma-raja meaning "king soma," indicating that cannabis and mushrooms may have alternated as the ancient and mysterious soma. Other Buddhist deities, said Crowley, are associated with the psilocybe mushroom and the DMT-containing Acacia catechu tree.




The next article (Claim #5) is about sex and cannabis. The section that mentions Buddhism implies that the Buddhist/Hindu-derived Tantra religion's mentioned acts are NOT known to be practiced today.

 Quote:
Tantra: Sexual cannabis use which transcended hedonism and medicine rose up in an esoteric Hindu-Buddhist tradition known as Tantra, a mystical religion which prescribes physical and mental exercises like meditation and yoga. These practices are intended to help the practicioner escape suffering and achieve enlightenment and perfection, known as Nirvana. Advanced Tantra marijuana rituals were intense, complex and difficult. Researchers have uncovered sacred texts describing cannabis rituals, but doubt that modern Tantra practitioners still engage in such activities.




The next page (Claim #6) does have poetry incorrectly identified as Haikus. I'll give you that. But as for the rest, it's about marijauna hemp's use as a fibre and more in Asian cultures, not necessarily about Buddhists smoking marijuana herb.

 Quote:
Hempen Purity: At Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples, certain objects are symbolically made from hemp. For example, the thick bell-ropes must be hempen, as is the noren, a short curtain which acts as a symbolic purification "veil", meant to cause evil spirits to flee from the body as the head brushes lightly beneath it. In another old tradition, rooms of worship were purified by burning cannabis leaves by the entrance. This would invite the spirits of the departed, purify the room and encourage people to dance.




As for the next one (Claim #7) the article is about cannabis and religion. All religious stories, texts, and tenets are disputed by people within the religion, so none of that can be taken as absolutely true or false. Various claims are believed by different faithful followers of any religion.



Finally, the last page (Claim #8) uses information referenced to a book, with the footnote #4. It's not being stated through our article, but through a publication written by wise psychedelic researchers.

 Quote:
Schultz. Richard & Hoffman, Albert -- 'Plants of the Gods: Origin of Hallucinogenic Use', McGraw-Hill, 1979.




I hope that answers your queries.
Regards,
Jodie

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#3 chrisbennett

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 08:23 AM

There is no orthodox Buddhism, just a bunch of different traditions. The claims about Buddha surviving on one hemp seed a day are just as legitimate as those which state a grain of rice a day, and the idea that Buddha used hemp seeds is by no way a recent conclusion but comes from older sources, see Prof. Richard evans Schultes and Prof. Albert Hoffman's Plants of the Gods, the same respected sources state " In Tantric Buddhism of the Himilayas of Tibet, cannabis plays a very important role in the meditative ritual used to facilitate deep meditation and hieghten awareness."

Maybe you should write Time Magazine as well...

"An ancient prophecy holds that 2,500 years after Buddha's death the Way he founded will either fade away entirely or experience a renaissance." http://www.time.com/...06871-2,00.html

I agree with the other points made.

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#4 Nathyn

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 11:53 AM

 Originally Posted By: JodieGR
Hey Nathan! You just emailed me this message, but since you posted it here I want to reply openly.

The first article you referenced (Claims #1-3) is an interview with Spider Robinson and his wife. Those are quotes from a person's words in an interview, not intended to be taken as absolutely factual Buddhist truth.

True, but it still seems somewhat wrong to interview someone who doesn't seem to know what they're talking about. Interviews themselves should still be factchecked because publishing opinions implies endorsement of said opinions. And her statements on Buddhism seem to suggest most of her knowledge on the matter is based on stereotypes.

 Originally Posted By: JodieGR

Your second reference (Claim #4) is about the Entheogenesis conference, which had speakers discuss psychedelics and more. The comment about Buddhism is simply a comment about what an author has written.

 Quote:
Author Mike Crowley, who admitted to being a distant relation to Aleister Crowley, blew our minds with the assertion that certain Buddhists used to get high on Amanita muscaria mushrooms as part of a soma initiation, and that perhaps they still do. Crowley traced the use of mushrooms to a tantric Hindu sect that was absorbed into Buddhism, the Vajrayana, or "thunderbolt vehicle" sect – thunderbolts being commonly associated with mushrooms throughout ancient history. Crowley's conference paper also showed that the Tibetan word for cannabis is So.Ma.Ra.Dza, a term which is borrowed directly from the Sanskrit Soma-raja meaning "king soma," indicating that cannabis and mushrooms may have alternated as the ancient and mysterious soma. Other Buddhist deities, said Crowley, are associated with the psilocybe mushroom and the DMT-containing Acacia catechu tree.

Again, publishing such material implies support, especially with the tone it's written in.

Imagine if Cannabis Culture contained a sentence, "Author David Duke blew our minds with the assertion that the Holocaust never happened."

By giving a platform to fringe historians, you endorse such misinformation. If this is not the case, then, per any company that gives a controversial figure a platform, you should include a disclaimer, "The views expressed do not necessarily represent that of Cannabis Culture."

 Originally Posted By: JodieGR
The next article (Claim #5) is about sex and cannabis. The section that mentions Buddhism implies that the Buddhist/Hindu-derived Tantra religion's mentioned acts are NOT known to be practiced today.

It makes the false assertion that soma was KNOWN to contain cannabis and widely speculates that this practice may still exist today.

This is utter nonsense, because anyone can walk into a Tibetan monastery and ask them about the matter.

It speculates about Tibetan drug-use in the same way one could speculate about Jewish gold. It's absurd and if I were a Tibetan Buddhist, I'd be pretty offended

 Originally Posted By: JodieGR

 Quote:
Tantra: Sexual cannabis use which transcended hedonism and medicine rose up in an esoteric Hindu-Buddhist tradition known as Tantra, a mystical religion which prescribes physical and mental exercises like meditation and yoga. These practices are intended to help the practicioner escape suffering and achieve enlightenment and perfection, known as Nirvana. Advanced Tantra marijuana rituals were intense, complex and difficult. Researchers have uncovered sacred texts describing cannabis rituals, but doubt that modern Tantra practitioners still engage in such activities.

The next page (Claim #6) does have poetry incorrectly identified as Haikus. I'll give you that. But as for the rest, it's about marijauna hemp's use as a fibre and more in Asian cultures, not necessarily about Buddhists smoking marijuana herb.

They aren't just incorrectly identified as haikus. They're also misleading. To my knowledge, hemp that was grown in Asia did not contain THC and it was never smoked or ingested for intoxicating purposes. The article suggests exactly that: that wandering Zen poets got high. The Buddha specifically forbid intoxication which is why even alcohol is considered immoral.

For this reason, the translation "cannabis" is also somewhat inaccurate. "Hemp" is more appropriate.

 Originally Posted By: JodieGR

As for the next one (Claim #7) the article is about cannabis and religion. All religious stories, texts, and tenets are disputed by people within the religion, so none of that can be taken as absolutely true or false. Various claims are believed by different faithful followers of any religion.

Yeah, I won't dispute you on this one, because there have been hundreds of different claims about Maitreya. However, a hard-nosed scholar would acknowledge these many differences in opinion, as you've just acknowledged here, and not say, "The Buddhist religion has prophecies which state their religion will last 2,500 years, a period now coming to a close," when that's not a widely held Buddhist belief.

 Originally Posted By: JodieGR

Finally, the last page (Claim #8) uses information referenced to a book, with the footnote #4. It's not being stated through our article, but through a publication written by wise psychedelic researchers.

 Quote:
Schultz. Richard & Hoffman, Albert -- 'Plants of the Gods: Origin of Hallucinogenic Use', McGraw-Hill, 1979.




I hope that answers your queries.
Regards,
Jodie

Please use reliable sources from now on. Self-published authors and "psychadelic researchers" are not reliable sources.

 Originally Posted By: chrisbennett
There is no orthodox Buddhism, just a bunch of different traditions. The claims about Buddha surviving on one hemp seed a day are just as legitimate as those which state a grain of rice a day, and the idea that Buddha used hemp seeds is by no way a recent conclusion but comes from older sources, see Prof. Richard evans Schultes and Prof. Albert Hoffman's Plants of the Gods, the same respected sources state " In Tantric Buddhism of the Himilayas of Tibet, cannabis plays a very important role in the meditative ritual used to facilitate deep meditation and hieghten awareness."

In some sense, Theravada Buddhism is "orthodox." While there is no true orthodox Buddhism, there is however mainstream Buddhism. Any discussion of it should, in some way, represent some respected Buddhist tradition -- not misinformation by pseudo-scholars.

Also, again, the claim about the Buddha living off of hemp seeds seems to be based off of a mistranslation of a certain sutra. I can contact someone who can specifically name the sutras involved, where the Buddha is said to have only lived on a grain of rice a day. They can also name the specific Pali or Sanskrit, and how the word was "grain of rice," not "hemp seed."

And in any case, even if it could be translated that way, eating hemp seeds does not lead to intoxication.

Overall, it's not just specific issues that bother me, but rather, it's the overall pattern of misrepresentating Buddhism as a religion which endorses mindless hedonism and intoxication.

My own recreational use of marijuana has been enjoyable and I agree it's no worse than alcohol, but there is no doubt in the mind of virtually all Buddhists that marijuana leads to heedlessness, laziness, and suffering. Not because marijuana in and of itself is "bad," but because:

1) Attachment to the pleasure of cannabis can lead to suffering when you can no longer smoke cannabis
2) Intoxication of any kind, including marijuana use, distorts our view of the world

I support full legalization of all drugs, so bear in mind, I'm "on your side." But the above points should be clarified in any discussion of Buddhism. And invoking Buddhism as support for illegal drug-use is dishonest and reckless.

 Originally Posted By: chrisbennett

Maybe you should write Time Magazine as well...

"An ancient prophecy holds that 2,500 years after Buddha's death the Way he founded will either fade away entirely or experience a renaissance." http://www.time.com/...06871-2,00.html

It's true that even many mainstream sources frequently publish inaccurate assertions about Buddhism. That is no justification for you to publish equally inaccurate material.

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#5 Jules Burt

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 02:07 PM

Hi Nathyn,

When I next read Cannabis Culture - I'll remember that it's a political magazine, with a stated objective (to normalize cannabis use)...and therefore realize that on occasion it's not the most 'scientific', 'objective' or even 'balanced' journal.

Generally though it's a great read from cover to cover!

Jules.

btw. Buddhists don't generally get too attached to 'right or wrong'...right?

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#6 Nathyn

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 03:24 PM

 Originally Posted By: Jules Burt
Hi Nathyn,

When I next read Cannabis Culture - I'll remember that it's a political magazine, with a stated objective (to normalize cannabis use)...and therefore realize that on occasion it's not the most 'scientific', 'objective' or even 'balanced' journal.

Generally though it's a great read from cover to cover!

Yeah. I think overall the research shows that marijuana is as harmless as alcohol. Still, though, there can be problem just as with alcohol. As a result of developing this kind of "stoner" attitude, I quit my last two jobs for pretty stupid reasons... I just felt like, "Man, I don't want to do this **** anymore."

The last time I quit, I had 3K in the bank. 1K went towards videogames and the other 2K went towards getting high for a couple months.

Although it's usually the nicotine withdrawal (because I smoke blunts), but also because of the social factor (it's fun to smoke weed with friends) and because it's so enjoyable, weed can be very addictive for some people and cause suffering.

So, while I agree most people have absurd views about marijuana and it should be legalized per the same reasons as alcohol, there can be "potheadism" just as much as "alcoholism."

In cannabis culture (the culture, not the magazine), being a "pothead" is unfortunately often considered a compliment and it shouldn't be. If you can't smoke weed within moderation, you shouldn't smoke at all. And if you can find a hobby that doesn't involve regularly getting baked, that's even better.

In reaction to the drug war and a cultural bias against smoking marijuana, potsmokers shouldn't try to counter that by claiming marijuana is good for you or holy, which CC mag often seems to suggest. I know this appeals to ignorant stoners, but it's misleading and wrong.

 Originally Posted By: Jules Burt

btw. Buddhists don't generally get too attached to 'right or wrong'...right?

As a general rule, no. In practice, many of them do.

A lot of westerners don't know a lot about Buddhism, so they go by stereotypes, which are a huge distortion. Religious Buddhists aren't really that much different from religious Jews, Christians, and Muslims.

"Traditional" Buddhism still has silly taboos against homosexuality, masturbation, and yes, most Buddhists seem to strangely think marijuana is worse than alcohol.

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#7 jacob

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 04:28 PM

Nathyn, you make some pretty interesting points here, but given the lack of first hand writings by Siddhartha Guatama, and given the lack of first hand source information from the 4th century BC and given that in it's 2300 year history Buddhism has spread around the world, and given that Buddhism itself has been reinterpreted in a myriad of ways, often mixing with local customs; given all of that, don't you think it's possible that at some point in history, in some place, individuals may have pursued a understanding of the 4 Noble Truths and the 8-Fold Path in ways outside your understanding of mainstream Mahayana and Theravada Buddhism? Is it not possible these authors cite legitimate examples of a historically uncommon approach to Buddhism?

Do you not believe the middle path on this would be engaging in an a less absolutist understanding of history? The 5th precept refers to a loss of mindfulness and to intoxication. Cannabis is non-toxic and mindfulness (meditation) is arguably enhanced in experienced users of Cannabis. In short, an argument that Cannabis use is against the 5th precept is certainly not clear-cut.

On a further note, I smoke all day, I read, I write, I work and I research, I've been doing this for 8 years! I am surrounded by people who do the same, and have done so for longer.

The causal relationship between laziness and marijuana is not clear-cut either; In other words, does pot make you lazy, or does laziness make you gravitate towards pot? So, as Marc says, if it's a problem for you, don't blame the plant; stop smoking.

Hope things go better for you man, I enjoy the philosophical debates!

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#8 ΘℏΙℊℏο ☞

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 07:08 PM

 Quote:
Yeah. I think overall the research shows that marijuana is as harmless as alcohol. Still, though, there can be problem just as with alcohol. As a result of developing this kind of "stoner" attitude, I quit my last two jobs for pretty stupid reasons... I just felt like, "Man, I don't want to do this **** anymore."


Now isn't that stereotyping? I'm a "stoner" and I have no problem with calling myself a "pothead". I also smoke daily, but in moderation but I'm also a 24/7 365 caregiver for the past 7 years. I know plenty of "potheads" who are chronic but who are hard workers.

Now granted when I was younger there were chronic smokers who were lazy. Noncommittal would be a better word. But I also know lazy people who don't smoke...

So is it the substance or the people? I'm inclined to say it's the people. So maybe your attributing your usage to factors that aren't necessarily directly related. I don't think pot has so much magical control over a person to affect there decision making process. You must have had a rationale for quiting your work? Everyone who quits usually does.

 Quote:
The last time I quit, I had 3K in the bank. 1K went towards videogames and the other 2K went towards getting high for a couple months.


Again...that's about you and your self-control. I know people who've spent more money on video games and sound equipment. I know people who've spent more on going to concerts and movies in a shorter period of time than what you state. Are they suffering or did they just blow there money? I'd say they just blew there money. It's nothing new, no startling revelation there.

I'd say you like smoking pot. So do I. Is that really wrong? I don't think so. Maybe your feeling a little guilty about spending your money like that. But why should you be? Were you feeling guilty every time you went to the bank and withdrew money to buy a sack? Methinks it's more like "buyers remorse".

 Quote:
Although it's usually the nicotine withdrawal (because I smoke blunts), but also because of the social factor (it's fun to smoke weed with friends) and because it's so enjoyable, weed can be very addictive for some people and cause suffering.


Weed is proven to not be physically addictive. I don't know if you've ever been around a habitual cocaine or heroin user but the difference is very dramatic. Stick a heroin user in a room for a weekend and then stick a pothead in another room. The pothead will be bored and the heroin user will be laying in a pile of vomit.

But I have to ask what suffering do you attribute to it? Having less money? Money that would be spent on various things, regardless? Is spending money on weed any less justifiable than spending it on other things?

 Quote:
So, while I agree most people have absurd views about marijuana and it should be legalized per the same reasons as alcohol, there can be "potheadism" just as much as "alcoholism."


Maybe in a psychological sense, perhaps. But thats more to do with the person than the substance. I have to say that the greatest users of cannabis are vastly far more capable than real honest-to-god alcoholics.

 Quote:
In cannabis culture (the culture, not the magazine), being a "pothead" is unfortunately often considered a compliment and it shouldn't be. If you can't smoke weed within moderation, you shouldn't smoke at all. And if you can find a hobby that doesn't involve regularly getting baked, that's even better.


Again in terms of excess, the most excessive smokers are far more capable than alcoholics and therefore the one to one comparison, in terms of the effect, is unjustified.

In terms of hobbies there are people who spend time and money on so many things that would seem pointless to me or you. Does that make there hobbies less justified? Does it make your hobbies less justified? It's there life.

 Quote:
In reaction to the drug war and a cultural bias against smoking marijuana, potsmokers shouldn't try to counter that by claiming marijuana is good for you or holy, which CC mag often seems to suggest. I know this appeals to ignorant stoners, but it's misleading and wrong.


It appeals to me and I say again I am a stoner but I'm certainly not ignorant of the facts.

Whose to say what is "Good" and what is "Bad"? A doctor will tell you water is good but drinking enough water can cause water intoxication. Is that enough to say that water is bad? No. Does that make the doctors assertion that water is good always true? No.

Still even cannabis doesn't have a realistic limit to what a person can smoke in a day but water has a limit to what a person can drink. It's far more realistic to damage yourself with water than with cannabis. Does that make weed better than water? No. But it can be said can it not?

The one thing that you've said that I do have a problem with is your use of "holy". No one and I mean no one has the right to tell another what is not holy. And thats coming from an atheist.

But also, consider the source. "Cannabis Culture". Is this magazine and forum any different, in this context, from a Beer magazine? A Tobacco enthusiasts magazine?

It's like walking into a supermarket and saying "they're pushing this food thing a little too far".

What do you expect? Of course cannabis enthusiasts are going to expound on the virtues of cannabis... It's normal and more so, it's human.

So, to wrap this up. If there any problems associated with cannabis it has to do with the individual, not the substance nor humanity as a whole. For every bad example you have there are as many positive examples.

You abuse pot, it doesn't abuse you. But their are far worse things to abuse than pot. And Pot doesn't magically rewire peoples brains and transform them into cookie cutter copies. Each person is unique. Each person is an individual. Results may very and peoples lives are different. What you may take as suffering can be another persons idea of bliss. Ever hear of "one mans garbage is another mans treasure"? Think about that.

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#9 chrisbennett

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 07:49 PM

So your personal view of Buddhism is the right view? Time Magazine is wrong? (which was just the first source that came up in a Google search, there are more)And Proffesor Richard Evans Schultes, one of the 20th centuries most respected botanists, and Prof. Albert Hoffman, regarded as a National Treasure in Switzerland, are fringe sources? Btw 'Plants of the Gods' is not a self published book, but rather a well known book that has been republished many times.

Also, there is some pretty strong archeological evidence that cannabis was the soma
http://www.cannabisc...icles/3155.html
or video
http://www.pot-tv.ne...howse-2041.html

And cannabis is still used today in Hindu religous ceremonies as it has been for thousands of years. It's the stuff the yogis and saddhus smoke in chillums, and other members of society use as a beverage in celebrations like the 'Festival of Colors'. (You know the place Nathyn, its where that dead beat dad Buddha came from). There is so much written on this I don't even need to cite anything.

Moreover, there are numerous references to cannabis in Asia, and these have been refered to by a number of authors. Also, there is no evidence what so ever that the cannabis grown in Asia was devoid of THC.

From an article on cannabis n the ancient world I recently wrote for an upcoming journal on cannabis

"Cannabis in China

The earliest reference to the use of marijuana as a medicine is believed to have occurred sometime around 2,800 BCE , in the medical compendium, the Pen Ts’ao of the legendary Chinese Emperor Shen-Nung. As Emperor, Shen-Nung was concerned that the priests were unable to effectively treat the maladies of his subjects by performing magical rites, and decided to find alternative remedies for the sick. Despite being emperor, Shen-Nung was apparently also an expert farmer, and had a thorough knowledge of plants. With this in mind, undoubtedly taken alongside a knowledge of indigenous folk remedies, Shen-Nung decided to explore the curative powers of plants, using himself as the test subject. History turns to myth here, as ancient compilers state that Shen-Nung was aided in his studies by having the superman like power of being able to see through his abdominal wall and into his stomach, enabling the Emperor to observe the effects of the plants he experimented with on his digestive system!

In the Chinese cosmology, the universe is composed of two elements, the Yang, representing the strong, active, positive masculine force and Yin, the weak, passive and negative female influence. In the individual, when these forces are in balance, the body is healthy, but too much of one or not enough of another and the result is diss-ease. In the case of the application of marijuana to such an ailment, this was difficult as it had both male and female plants, and contained both yin and yang. Shen-Nung determined that it was the female plant that contained the most potent medicine, being a very high source of yin, and prescribed chu-ma, (female hemp, as opposed to ma, hemp) for the treatment of absentmindedness, constipation, malaria, beriberi, rheumatism and menstrual problems. The” Father of Chinese Medicine“, Shen-Nung, was so thoroughly impressed with the beneficial effects of chuma, he deemed it one of the Superior Elixirs of Immortality.

Throughout the centuries, Chinese physicians continued to prescribe marijuana, and as they became more familiar with the effects of the plant, new discoveries were made about its properties. Such as that made in 200 AD, by the early and well-known Chinese surgeon, Hua T’o. Almost 2,000 years ago Hua T’o is reputed to have performed such complicated operations as “organ grafts, resectioning of intestines, laparotomies (incisions into the loin), and thoracotomies (incisions into the chest)” (Abel 1980). Moreover, these dangerous and complicated surgeries were rendered painless by an anesthetic prepared from cannabis resin and wine known as ma-yo. An excerpt from his biography gives us a descriptive account of how this ancient medical sage utilized cannabis in these procedures;

“… if the malady resided in the parts on which the needle [acupuncture], cautery, or medicinal liquids were incapable of acting, for example, in the bones, in the stomach or in the intestine, he administered a preparation of hemp [ma-yo] and, in the course of several minutes, an insensibility developed as if one had been plunged into drunkenness or deprived of life. Then, according to the case, he performed the opening, the incision or amputation and relieved the cause of the malady; then he apposed the tissues by sutures and applied liniments. After a certain number of days the patient finds he has recovered without having experienced the slightest pain during the operation.”[As quoted in (Abel 1980)]

Ancient Chinese Shamans showed their awareness of cannabis medical powers symbolically, by carving serpents into a stalk of hemp and using it as a magic wand for healing ceremonies.

China’s ancient use of cannabis flowers and leaves was not limited to medicine, as ancient Taoist references record that the herb was also used for mystical purposes as well.” A Taoist priest wrote in the fifth century B.C. that Cannabis was employed by “necromancers, in combination with Ginseng, to set forward time and reveal future events.” In these early periods, use of Cannabis as an hallucinogen was undoubtedly associated with Chinese shamanism…”Schultes and Hoffman, 1992) . A quatrain from the ancient Chinese classic ‘Greater Lord of the Long Life’, believed to be written around 300 BC, gives a clear impression of cannabis’ importance to the mystics of the area and era.

First a yin then a yang
No one knows what I do
Jade buds of holy hemp
for the one who lives apart
As quoted in ‘Road To Heaven: Encounters with Chinese Hermits’, (Porter, 1993)

In the 2006 Journal of Ethnopharmacology article ‘A new insight into Cannabis sativa (Cannabaceae) utilization from 2500 year-old Yanghai Tombs, Xinjiang, China’ the authors discuss rare well preserved archeological specimens of cannabis and conclude that “Based on the shamanistic background of the deceased man and ancient customs, it is assumed that the Cannabis was utilized for ritual/medicinal purposes.” (Jiang et. al. 2006)

“The deceased, presumably a shaman, may have been mainly concerned with the ritual of communication between the human and the spirit world. The gift of Cannabis may have been to enable him to continue his profession in the afterlife. A shaman who knew the utility of herbal medicine also played the role of physician in ancient times…. . The new discovery of hemp in the Yanghai Tombs, Turpan, China provides evidence for ancient hemp utilization in Chinese… the hemp was used for medicinal and religious rituals in NW China…” (Jiang et. al. 2006)"



I will say one thing for Nathyn, he sure helps break the archetype that Buddhists are humble. Time to go back to the Bohdi Tree smartass.


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#10 chrisbennett

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 08:00 PM

"Yeah. I think overall the research shows that marijuana is as harmless as alcohol. Still, though, there can be problem just as with alcohol. As a result of developing this kind of "stoner" attitude, I quit my last two jobs for pretty stupid reasons... I just felt like, "Man, I don't want to do this **** anymore." "

There is no comparison, pot is good for you and booze is bad. (You need to do some research before you spout off more missinformation). How do you think these forums would look if everyone wriitng was drunk and not stoned?

"I just felt like, "Man, I don't want to do this **** anymore."

I've done that as well and I think that is a great reason to quit a job, one of the best. (and I've never been fired). Many folks don't have the guts to quit a job they hate. Why be attached to a slave position you hate? This is one of the threats cannabis holds against the industrial complex, that people might just quit the mills, assembly-lines and other crappy jobs to go out and discover themselves. You only live once, you might as well enjoy what you are doing with your time.... I mean Buddha was the ultimate job quitter, he even ditched his own family so he could follow the path, (which the dad in me thinks is pretty dead beat).

Who do you think is causing Green House warming, the motivated worker, or the drop-out hippy? The over industrious need to chill out a bit to save the planet. Reefers for the Factory slaves! this is a slogan for revolution.

And regarding attachments, in our modern day, who has given up more than the lowly Saddhu in India, but he still knows ganja helps him focus on the One.... That is why he lifts the chillum to his third eye and exclaims "BOOM SHIVA! BOOM MAHADEV! HARI, HARI, GANJA!" It was guys like those saddhus and yogis which the Buddha tutored under.

Cannabis, and by that I mean industrial hemp, medicinal marijuana, sacramental Ganja and even good old recreational pot holds more healing power than all the "Oms" of all the Buddhists who ever lived, both for us as individuals, for humanity as a whole and for our suffering planet. Light up and Lighten Up.

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#11 Nathyn

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 10:44 PM

You know, by saying such ridiculous things as, "Pot is good for you," you hurt the credibility of the pro-legalization movement,

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#12 ΘℏΙℊℏο ☞

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 12:06 AM

I dunno, the studies regarding alzheimers and cancer studies are pretty compelling. There are several.

It's not as if anybodies just making this up man.

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#13 chrisbennett

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 06:05 AM

Pot is Good for you, that is the truth, if you took the time for a closer look you would know this. By being uneducated in the matter and saying cannabis is bad for you, you are hurting the legalization movement. Moreover you are hurting your own credibility here, let's face it, you have made all sorts of assertions that are just plain bullshit. Be honest with yourself here if you are on the "path" and true spiritual growth is what you seek. You said the cannabis in Asia held no THC and people didn't use cannabis there for it's psychoactive effects. this was just complete hogwash, then you said Time Magazine and well known academics like Prof. R. E. Schultes, and Prof. A. Hoffman are not credible sources.

Before you make any claims here again of any kind, maybe you should start citing some credible references, as your credibility is all gone now son.

There are numerous stories like the following if you do some research, stories about how pot increases brain cell growth, retards lung cancer, is an antioxidant..... read and learn. Pot is good for you. (if you are worried about smoking, buy a vaporizer)!

Study: Marijuana Appears to Slow Cancer Growth in Laboratory Setting

http://www.foxnews.c...,318526,00.html

Certain marijuana components may suppress the tumors of highly invasive cancers, a new study finds.

In laboratory tests, cannabinoids, the active components in marijuana, were found to slow the spread of lung and cervical cancer tumors, according to researchers Robert Ramer and Burkhard Hinz of the University of Rostock in Germany.

Proponents of medical marijuana believe that cannabinoids reduce the side effects of cancer treatment, such as pain, weight loss and vomiting.

The study, published in the Jan. 2 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, finds that the compounds may also have an anticancer effect; however, more research is needed to determine whether the laboratory results will hold true in humans, the authors wrote.

In addition to suppressing tumor cell invasion, cannabinoids also stimulated the expression of TIMP-1, an inhibitor of a group of enzymes involved in tumor cell invasion.

"To our knowledge, this is the first report of TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive effects of cannabinoids," the authors wrote. "This signaling pathway may play an important role in the antimetastatic action of cannabinoids, whose potential therapeutic benefit in the treatment of highly invasive cancers should be addressed in clinical trials."

Marijuana chemical tapped to fight strokes

http://www.sciencene..._11_98/fob2.htm

By J. Brainard

The breakfast table may someday feature not only orange juice and vitamins but also a more exotic health booster—a compound extracted from marijuana.

Cannabis contains a chemical that can protect cells by acting as an antioxidant, a new study shows. More effective than vitamins C or E, it offers an appealing option for the treatment and perhaps prevention of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, and heart attacks, the researchers suggest.

However, there's no worry that those who take it will become too stoned to read the morning paper. The compound, called cannabidiol, doesn't make people high.

Scientists have yet to test whether the chemical has a protective effect in people. In test-tube experiments, researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., exposed rat nerve cells to a toxin that is typically released during strokes. Cannabidiol reduces the extent of damage, the scientists report in the July 7 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In follow-up studies, the researchers induced strokes in rats and treated them with cannabidiol. Those experiments are not yet complete, but "we're getting some good results," says Aidan J. Hampson, a neuropharmacologist at NIH.

Researchers suspect that many antioxidants can reduce the severity of ischemic strokes, in which blood vessels in the brain become blocked. During ischemic strokes, which make up 80 percent of all strokes, a toxin initiates the release of reactive oxygen molecules called free radicals into the bloodstream. These harmful molecules are under suspicion as one of the agents that cause stroke damage, such as paralysis and loss of speech and vision. Antioxidants such as cannabidiol neutralize free radicals and so might limit the damage.

The NIH researchers had suspected that the group of molecules including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the marijuana ingredient that produces a high, would act as antioxidants. In their study, THC and cannabidiol provided equal defense against cell damage. An earlier study at the University of Arizona in Tucson turned up no side effects of cannabidiol in people given large doses.

A pharmaceutical company, Pharmos in Rehovot, Israel, is already conducting human clinical trials using a synthetic marijuana derivative, Dexanabinol, to treat damage from strokes and brain injury. Like cannabidiol, this compound is an antioxidant and does not produce euphoria.

"This is a promising area [of research] . . . particularly because we have so few effective means of treating stroke," said JoAnn E. Manson, a researcher in preventive medicine at Harvard Medical School. Stroke is the third leading killer in the United States (SN: 12/21&28/96, p. 388).

The NIH researchers don't anticipate using cannabidiol to treat hemorrhagic stroke, characterized by bleeding within the brain, Hampson says. Antioxidants, however, could help treat other diseases that appear to be caused in part by free radicals. These include heart disease and two neurodegenerative disorders, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

Cannabis compound slows lung cancer in mice
http://www.newscient...er-in-mice.html
14:07 18 April 2007
NewScientist.com news service
Roxanne Khamsi
The active compound in marijuana, THC, can slow the growth of lung tumours and reduce the spread of the cancer in mice, a preliminary study reveals.

Human lung cancer tumours grew less than half as fast in mice that received moderate doses of the compound, the researchers reveal. They hope that drugs mimicking the apparent anti-cancer effects of tetrahydrocanabinol (THC) could one day help treat patients. The team strongly discourage people from self-medicating by smoking marijuana, noting that doing so could potentially encourage tumour growth.

Ramesh Ganju at the Harvard Cancer Center in Boston, Massachusetts, US, and colleagues deposited human lung cancer cells under the skin of a dozen mice and allowed the tumours to grow in the animals for about two weeks. They then began giving half of these mice daily injections of about 250 micrograms of synthetic THC right next to the tumours for three weeks. A cannabis cigarette may contain as much as 150 milligrams of THC.

Tumours in the control mice averaged about 0.6 grams in weight by the end of the five-week trial. By comparison, those in the mice that received THC weighed just 0.25 grams – 60% less.

Blood blocker
In a separate experiment to test whether THC could slow the spread of cancer cells (metastasis), the researchers injected human lung cancer cells into the tail veins of mice to mimic such a spread. The team immediately started giving half of these animals a daily 250 microgram injection of THC for three weeks. They found 60% fewer cancerous lesions in the mice that received THC compared to the control animals.

Ganju believes that THC inhibits cancer growth by blocking the formation of blood vessels within tumours. Previous tests on human lung cancer cells in a dish suggested that THC blocked the signalling of a substance known as epidermal growth factor (EGF). Under normal circumstances, EGF may promote blood vessel development, Ganju says.

Previous studies have also found that THC can shrink brain tumours. Nevertheless, experts caution people against smoking marijuana. "I wouldn't advise that. It could make the cancer grow faster," says Ganju, noting that THC might encourage the growth of breast cancer. He adds that that "a lot of work needs to be done" before scientists fully understand how THC affects tumours.

While some studies have found no link between cannabis use and cancer, others have concluded that cannabis smoking is "more harmful" than tobacco because the smoke is inhaled more deeply into the lungs.

Ganju's team presented the new findings this week at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Los Angeles, California, US.


Cannabis extract shrinks brain tumours
http://www.newscient...6283&print=true
05:00 15 August 2004
NewScientist.com news service
Shaoni Bhattacharya
Cannabis extracts may shrink brain tumours and other cancers by blocking the growth of the blood vessels which feed them, suggests a new study.

An active component of the street drug has previously been shown to improve brain tumours in rats. But now Manuel Guzmán at Complutense University, Spain, and colleagues have demonstrated how the cannabis extracts block a key chemical needed for tumours to sprout blood vessels – a process called angiogenesis.

And for the first time, the team has shown the cannabinoids impede this chemical in people with the most aggressive form of brain cancer - glioblastoma multiforme.

Cristina Blázquez at Complutense University, and one of the team, stresses the results are preliminary. “But it’s a good point to start and continue,” she told New Scientist.

“The cannabinoid inhibits the angiogenesis response - if a tumour doesn’t do angiogenesis, it doesn’t grow,” she explains. “So if you can improve angiogenesis on one side and kill the tumour cells on the other side, you can try for a therapy for cancer.”

"This research provides an important new lead compound for anti-cancer drugs targeting cancer's blood supply,” says Richard Sullivan, head of clinical programmes, at Cancer Research UK.

Fat molecule
The team tested the effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in 30 mice. They found the marijuana extract inhibited the expression of several genes related to the production of a chemical called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

VEGF is critical for angiogenesis, which allows tumours to grow a network of blood vessels to supply their growth. The cannabinoid significantly lowered the activity of VEGF in the mice and two human brain cancer patients, the study showed.

The drug did this by increasing the activity of a fat molecule called ceramide, suggests the study, as adding a ceramide inhibitor stifled the ability of the cannabinoid to block VEGF.

Small and pallid
“We saw that the tumours [in mice] were smaller and a bit pallid,” adds Blázquez. The paleness of the cancer reflected its lack of blood supply as a result of the treatment. In the human patients, she says: "It seems that it works, but it's very early."

Sullivan points out: “Although this work is at an early stage of development other research has already demonstrated that VEGF is an important drug target for a range of cancers.”

He emphasises the need for further work on cannabinoid combinations. “Cannabinoids would need to generate very strong data in the future as there are already a number of VEGF inhibitors in clinical development,” he says.

The two patients in the ongoing study are among 14 in a clinical trial of the drug. The patients are given one cycle of treatment, lasting a few days, and their survival and general health are being studied.

Journal reference: Cancer Research (vol 64, p 5617)


Cannabis can help MS sufferers
http://www.newscient...4356&print=true
00:01 07 November 2003
NewScientist.com news service
Andy Coghlan
Claims that cannabis can relieve the symptoms of multiple sclerosis have been reinforced by results from the world's largest ever trial of the medicinal effects of the drug - but only just.

The main improvements seen were in subjective measures of symptoms, i.e. those reported by the patients, rather than in those measured using standardised tests. Nonetheless, the study on 630 MS patients has been greeted as providing the strongest scientific justification yet for legalising medicines based on marijuana.

"The study does suggest that for some people, they may be of benefit, particularly in terms of pain relief and muscle stiffness," says Alan Thompson, at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London, UK, and co-leader of the research.

Thompson and his colleagues divided their 630 patients into three groups. The first received D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active ingredient of cannabis. The second group received a cannabis plant extract, and the third a placebo.

Muscular stiffness
The investigators particularly wanted to find out whether the drugs could ease symptoms of spasticity, the muscular stiffness and jerky movements that afflict patients with MS.

Standard objective tests to measure the severity of spasticity suggested the drugs were no more effective than the placebo. But 60 per cent of treated patients reported a reduction in spasticity, compared with 46 per cent who received the placebo.

Furthermore, 54 per cent of the treated patients reported pain relief compared with 37 per cent receiving the placebo. "This suggests cannabinoids may benefit some patients," says Thompson. However, the researchers note some of the patient's receiving cannabis became "light-headed", meaning they realised they were receiving the drug rather than the placebo - which might affect the subjective ratings.

But the UK Multiple Sclerosis Society says the results reinforce the need for researchers to focus as much on how patients say they feel as on what the tests measure. The society is calling for cannabis-based drugs of proven benefit to be made available through the UK's National Health Service.

Evidence base
In a commentary on team's paper in The Lancet, Luanne Metz and Stacey Page, at the University of Calgary, Canada, note: "We now have as much evidence to support the use of these oral cannabinoids - as we do for many standard therapies for spasticity."

The UK's National Institute for Clinical Excellence is evaluating the potential for cannabis-based medicines, but its advice is not expected next June.

Britain's drug approval authorities are also midway through evaluating an application to sell a cannabinoid-based painkiller. If it is approved, the government has promised to amend the law classifying marijuana as an illegal drug to allow the medicine based on it to be given legally.

In the meantime, the researchers have warned patients against smoking marijuana to relieve symptoms. "The major problem with smoking is making sure you know how much active component is in the blood, and the second problem is the cancer risk," says Thompson.

Journal reference: The Lancet (vol 362, 1517)

http://news.bbc.co.u...lth/7098340.stm
Cannabis compound 'halts cancer'
A compound found in cannabis may stop breast cancer spreading throughout the body, US scientists believe.
The California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute team are hopeful that cannabidiol or CBD could be a non-toxic alternative to chemotherapy.

Unlike cannabis, CBD does not have any psychoactive properties so its use would not violate laws, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics reports.

The authors stressed that they were not suggesting patients smoke marijuana.

They added that it would be highly unlikely that effective concentrations of CBD could be reached by smoking cannabis.

Marijuana might cause new cell growth in the brain
22:00 13 October 2005
http://www.newscient...8155&print=true
NewScientist.com news service
Kurt Kleiner
A synthetic chemical similar to the active ingredient in marijuana makes new cells grow in rat brains. What is more, in rats this cell growth appears to be linked with reducing anxiety and depression. The results suggest that marijuana, or its derivatives, could actually be good for the brain.

In mammals, new nerve cells are constantly being produced in a part of the brain called the hippocampus, which is associated with learning, memory, anxiety and depression. Other recreational drugs, such as alcohol, nicotine and cocaine, have been shown to suppress this new growth. Xia Zhang of the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada, and colleagues decided to see what effects a synthetic cannabinoid called HU210 had on rats' brains.

They found that giving rats high doses of HU210 twice a day for 10 days increased the rate of nerve cell formation, or neurogenesis, in the hippocampus by about 40%.

Just like Prozac?
A previous study showed that the antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) also increases new cell growth, and the results indicated that it was this cell growth that caused Prozac’s anti-anxiety effect. Zhang wondered whether this was also the case for the cannabinoid, and so he tested the rats for behavioural changes.

When the rats who had received the cannabinoid were placed under stress, they showed fewer signs of anxiety and depression than rats who had not had the treatment. When neurogenesis was halted in these rats using X-rays, this effect disappeared, indicating that the new cell growth might be responsible for the behavioural changes.

In another study, Barry Jacobs, a neuroscientist at Princeton University, gave mice the natural cannabinoid found in marijuana, THC (D9-tetrahydrocannabinol)). But he says he detected no neurogenesis, no matter what dose he gave or the length of time he gave it for. He will present his results at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington DC in November.

Jacobs says it could be that HU210 and THC do not have the same effect on cell growth. It could also be the case that cannabinoids behave differently in different rodent species - which leaves open the question of how they behave in humans.

Zhang says more research is needed before it is clear whether cannabinoids could some day be used to treat depression in humans.

Journal reference: Journal of Clinical Investigation (DOI:10.1172/JCI25509)


Cannabis may soothe inflamed bowels
10:28 01 August 2005
http://www.newscient...7766&print=true
NewScientist.com news service
Gaia Vince
Cannabis-based drugs could offer treatment hope to sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease, UK researchers report.

Cannabis smokers with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have often claimed that smoking a joint seems to lessen their symptoms. So a group of researchers from Bath University and Bristol University, both in the UK, decided to explore the clinical basis for the claims.

“There is quite a lot of anecdotal evidence that using cannabis seems to reduce the pain and frequency of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, so we decided to see if we could find out what was going on there,” says Karen Wright, a pharmacologist at Bath University. “Historically, it was smoked in India and China centuries ago for its gastrointestinal properties.”

The chronic conditions, known collectively as IBD, are caused by an over-active immune system which produces severe inflammation in areas of the gastrointestinal tract. Up to 180,000 people in the UK are thought to have colitis or Crohn’s disease and suffer symptoms of pain, urgent diarrhoea, severe tiredness and loss of weight. Repeated attacks can lead to scarring of the colon and fibrosis to the extent that the bowel narrows to form a stricture, for which a colonectomy – the surgical removal of the bowel – is the only cure.

Repair trigger
Reports that cannabis eased IBD symptoms indicated the possible existence of cannabinoid receptors in the intestinal lining, which respond to molecules in the plant-derived chemicals. Wright and colleagues grew sections of human colon and examined them in vitro.

To their surprise, the team discovered CB1 cannabinoid receptors – which are known to be present in the brain – in the endothelial cells which line the gut. “I think they must be involved in repairing the lining of the gut when it is damaged,” Wright says.

She deliberately damaged the cells to cause inflammation of the gut lining and then added synthetically produced cannabinoids. “The gut started to heal: the broken cells were repaired and brought back closer together to mend the tears,” she told New Scientist.

Wright believes that in a healthy gut, natural endogenous cannabinoids are released from endothelial cells when they are injured, which then bind to the CB1 receptors. The process appears to set off a wound-healing reaction. “When people use cannabis, the cannabinoids bind to these receptors in the same way,” she said.

Excess cells
Previous studies have shown that CB1 receptors located on the nerve cells in the gut respond to cannabinoids by slowing gut motility, therefore reducing the painful muscle contractions associated with diarrhoea.

But Wright and her team also discovered another cannabinoid receptor, CB2, in the guts of IBD sufferers, which was not present in healthy guts. These receptors, which also respond to chemicals in cannabis, appear to be associated with apoptosis – programmed cell death – and may have a role in suppressing the overactive immune system and reducing inflammation by moping up excess cells, she suggests.

“Ideally we would want to be able to stimulate the body’s own endogenous cannabinoid system, which might become dysregulated during long-term inflammation. Knowing more about how this system actually works will help us to look for therapeutic targets,” Wright says. “We are not advocating cannabis use, particularly as smoking tobacco exacerbates Crohn's disease and many smokers of cannabis use tobacco as well.”

“Anything that offers hope is good news for sufferers of IBD,” says a spokesperson from the National Association for Colitis and Crohn’s Disease, commenting on the research.

Journal reference: Gastroenterology




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#14 Nathyn

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 08:33 AM

 Originally Posted By: Ohigho
I dunno, the studies regarding alzheimers and cancer studies are pretty compelling. There are several.

It's not as if anybodies just making this up man.

Please, do tell me: How does THC counteract the effect that tar has on the lungs?

There are conflicting studies. Some of which suggest smoking marijuana causes cancer and makes psychological problems worse (not "reefer madness," just worse anxiety and depression). Even if marijuana can act as an anti-depressant, most anti-depressants if abused recreationally can make psychological problems worse.

Emotional stability in a person comes from a complex combination of the right chemicals in the brain combined with a supportive social environment. For this reason, FINDING exactly what medications work for a person can be extremely difficult. And screwing with that delicate balance, whether it's through popping prozac or smoking weed to excess, can throw that out of balance.

You all act as if cannabis is a magical herb that you can use to excess without problems. That's completely irresponsible and you hurt the pro-legalization movement by being exactly the kind of irresponsible stoners, relying on fringe science, that critics of legalization accuse us of being.

The pro-legalization movement will succeed if we appeal to MAINSTREAM SCIENCE, not pseudoscience and New Age nonsense.

 Originally Posted By: chrisbennett
Pot is Good for you, that is the truth, if you took the time for a closer look you would know this. By being uneducated in the matter and saying cannabis is bad for you, you are hurting the legalization movement.

Instead of citing obscure studies that DON'T represent any scientific consensus, I challenge you to find a scientific paper which REVIEWS the overall research and comes to the conclusion that "Marijuana is good for you," as well as citing peer-reviews of such papers.

You won't find it, because it's nonsense.

I did not say (or at least, I did not mean to say) "cannabis is bad for you." It is not necessarily bad, because it is just a tool, like alcohol and food. What I said is that it should be used responsibly and that it can be abused. I know this because I have abused it myself.

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#15 flower power

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:13 AM

 Quote:

The one thing that you've said that I do have a problem with is your use of "holy". No one and I mean no one has the right to tell another what is not holy. And thats coming from an atheist.


Hues says Qadash highs says Quidditch .




What really is A- Theism ?

That's ONE question mark?

Most High are really D-eism ??

That's TWO question marks!

What's the Third question mark???

I suppose it would be a kind of Jazz Fusion of ALL THREE???

HOLY MUGGLES !!!

That's THREE question marks??? !!! ...

??? ... !!! with THREE exclamation marks... ??? !!!

The first shall be last and the last shall be first???

I tend to believe that only the MOST HIGH is purely HOLY.


Does that make FAITH weak or meek?

Matthew 5:5 Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.

Week Faith

I believe in Theism,
On Monday's and Tuesday's.
Deism is the rule,
On Wednesday's and Thursday's.
Atheism reigns Supreme,
On Friday's and Saturday's.
Witch leaves, the Tree of Life,
On Sunday's; for I am that I am re-defined...???
!!!DIVINE!!!

What PURE TRULY means though is maybe that The Ace of Diamonds and The Magician HIGH in the DECK, so to (s)Peak.



So what's all the SPIN about???

!!! Naturally !!!



a dangerous delusion

Is sliding on the Bass

!!!

A riff ripples through the syncopation

...

The new atheism

???

Then a rap, rap, rapping echoes in glowing feedback and the vision of the seventh trumpet bubbles like the bong, trebbling to sound...

???
!!!
...

May be, kind of like, sort of, ...

TEN TRUMPS, like ten virgins ready to get deflowered...

Matthew 25:1 Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened unto ten virgins, which took their lamps, and went forth to meet the bridegroom.

Ten Anagrams of PURE RELIGION, HIGH say...

(1) Genii Lure Pro
(2) Uglier One Rip
(3) Uglier Prone I
(4) Ignore Rule Pi
(5) Ego Peril Ruin
(6) Purge Lie Iron
(7) Purge Rein Oil
(8) Urge Peril Ion
(9) Pile Euro Grin
(10)Gene I Oil Purr

Speaking of digressions and progressions and HOLY salutations!!!

Numbers 10:10 Also in the day of your gladness, and in your solemn days, and in the beginnings of your months, ye shall blow with the trumpets over your burnt offerings, and over the sacrifices of your peace offerings; that they may be to you for a memorial before your God: I am the LORD your God.

Joshua 6:6 And Joshua the son of Nun called the priests, and said unto them, Take up the ark of the covenant, and let seven priests bear seven trumpets of rams' horns before the ark of the LORD.

Revelation 8:6 And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound.

The Tree of Life is COMING!!!



The only thingy dingy of the diddle daddle that I would conjecture and in the spirit of conJESTER at that, the constrictions of the restrictions, again so to peak, would be, well,

The HOLE is HOLY...right?

The sphere is the HOLY CREATION

So that which is anti-holy, could it be...??? !!!

The A-HOLE naturally!

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#16 tbud

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:04 AM


Buddha was a drummer!

Buddha Baddha

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#17 chrisbennett

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:41 AM

Nathyn, how about you show us one documented case of someone who got cancer or died from marijuana smoking. Just one, instead of always going back to your own opinion like it is some sort of gospel truth, as you have been doing since you showed up here. (That is a poor debate tactic sonny). Just one.... I mean with all the millions of pot smokers out there, there should be at least some sort of body count... if pot is as bad for you as you keep trying to tell us it is.....

After 17 years of activism, and meeting thousands of pot smokers, I have never met one who got cancer from using cannabis or know of anyone who died from cancer. Alternatively, I have met lots of cancer patients, along with others suffering from medical problems, who use cannabis medicinally.

Nathyn, you obviously looked at none of the sources I cited above such as New Scientist and the Lancet, like Time Magazine, Schultes and Hoffman, they are far from "fringe" sources. You have cited nothing but your own opinion, and as with your claims about Asia, Soma, the 2,500 years of Buddha's reign and other misconceptions you spread, I have proven you wrong. Your simpleton response to anything that doesn't fit in with your narrow view is that it is "fringe science". You sound like the Bush Administration. Ho Hum.

As for the Legalization Movement, you know less about that than you do about anything else here you have written about. Your advice on the matter is inconsequential. All that you are doing here is battling out your own inner struggle about your relationship with cannabis in a public forum. Sad really.

The problems you have with marijuana, (and reality in general) are your own, I hope you get them worked out. Try pot in that quest, it is good for you, and it has served you well already by giving you the push you needed to get out of jobs you hated.

You should take Pot every day, like Carl Sagan, Bob Marley or Marc Emery, it will help get you out of that egotistical rut you are in, (sorry buddy but all you have proven here with your self righteous attitude is your lack of knowledge)

Just don't become a Dead Beat dad, like that lazy ass who sat under the Bhodi Tree for so long... he was probably stoned as well.


POT IS GOOD FOR YOU.


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#18 escapegoat

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 07:15 PM

I love all peace loving people. However, I refuse to join a social club called "church" -- even if it is buddhist.

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#19 Antipas

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:20 PM

as long as Bhuddists know Jesus is God, I don't see what the problem is...

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The LORD is my strength, I will not faint from exhaustion.

#20 PoochDoobie

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 08:55 AM

 Originally Posted By: Antipas
as long as Bhuddists know Jesus is God, I don't see what the problem is...


Man anything you say here is public domain you know, EVERYONE can read it.

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I am a pot smoker, It's in my bones.

I think It got in through my lungs.